Should parents have online access to student grades?

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Okay now let me explain how

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Okay now let me explain how this is bad for everyone. Student tries best and grade is a B. Teacher doesn't really have much of a problem with the grades. Parent sees grades online and see's a handful of missed homework assignments and begins scolding the student. and they were just happy when told that overall it was a B and they dont care about the weight of the assignment and most likely they didnt count for much anyway. But their parents severe scolding leads to the student suddenly becoming stressed and trying to raise their grade by asking their teacher for help to do that. The teacher seeing nothing wrong with the grade will sometimes not offer extra credit. Thus leading to parents continuing to be upset about the small flaws in the students grade. Eventually leading to the parent attempting to contact the teacher, which would be stressful for the student regardless of scenario, and the teacher would get stressed and give more work to the student to raise their grades. But the student wasnt able to do each and every assignment before and they definitely wouldn't be able to that plus extra work while under so much stress. So you have a stressed student, stressed teacher and stressed parents.......not a fun situation

parent of 2 high school students

This is a valid point, and

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This is a valid point, and parents should take things like this into consideration. My son was failing math, and the topic they were going over was VERY difficult for him. I knew, however that he would be going on to a different topic and other grades would be coming in. What the online grading system did do for ME as a parent was clue me into the fact that his classes were offered an extra credit project that woudl boost his grade to a B if he completed it. I made him do this instead of punishing him for something he just didn't get (which happens in school, its a process of learning and you can't know everything). I also go online daily to see what assignments are due the next day. I ask my kids what is due, and hope they remember everything but I can be the backup and say, Oh really I think you have something due in a class. I try really hard to let them rely on themselves first to recall that information, but if not I may prompt even more. 9 times out of 10 they have that moment where they remember something is due on their own (looking at their planner, or just simply remembering). The online system has also, as a parent, clued me into issues that my kids may be having with a particular teachers grading method. Each teacher is different, and each student is different so there are bound to be issues that creep up. When I see that my child is consistently doing poorly on weekly quizes, I can connect with them and see why.

parent of 2 high school students

As a parent of a child with

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As a parent of a child with high functioning autism the online grading system and teachers websites have been a blessing and great tool to help my son learn in a regular educational setting. I as a parent take my children to school to learn, and hope that the instructors are doing their part in that role. When my kids have teachers who do not respond to emails, are not clear in their instructions, not clear with due dates, grade papers extremely late, etc. it makes supporting my children at home more difficult. This is especially true with my child on an IEP.

When my kids teachers use the online system to post when homework assignments are due, when tests are due, etc. it helps me stay on top of things, with my son especially. The kids have planners, but the online system can be a backup for them in case they have a bad day, the teacher announces the homework as everyone is leaving the class, etc.

The teachers who stay on top of grading, entering homework assignments prior to their due date, uploading worksheets, study guides,etc. really do protect themselves from parents and students complaning. There is, then really NO WAY anyone can say, " I didn't know about that" and have a leg to stand on.

My son often needs to KNOW when things are due, what is expected, and sometimes needs reinforcement of topics at home (taught in a different way, due to language issues). He also has a hard time remembering to turn things in. With the online system, I know as his parent what topics he is covering. If its a difficult topic, I can get him extra help in advance (rather than scrambling during the time the topic is being covered). He has a homework folder, and having access to the online system has provided a great way for both of us to check and make sure all his work is present and ready for the next day to be turned in.

Teachers have a responsiblity to keep the communication lines open with parents and students. This online system has actually reduced my communications with my kids teachers because I can simply go online and see what is due. Im not taking up the teachers time with simple questions that are now answered online. This leaves them more time to teach, grade papers, and have time to help students who are really struggling.

Personally I think ALL teachers should be made to use the online grading systems available. They should be REQUIRED to upload the next weeks assignments (or months) and tests PRIOR to them being due. I also think they should be required to respond to parental emails and phone calls in a timely manner.

Teachers and administrators are always saying they want more parental involvment but then when they have a tool like this avialble that can help with that, they don't use it!!!

Grading must have a subjective component

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While I'm happy to discuss grades at any time with any parent in person or by phone, I'm very nervous about any trend to make the microscopic details of grading available on line. We must realize that there is a significant subjective component to grading students, especially K-12 students. It's not strictly a numbers game.

Consider two kids who stand at 69.2% at the end of a grading period - a D+ in many systems. The first had a D+ average for the whole marking period, the second started poorly, perhaps for some good reason, but he or she poured it on and was fully engaged by the end of the term. A good teacher, in my view, will note the difference and reward the latter student with a C- or better - and some strong encouragement. Now imagine that both sets of parents compare notes and perceive an injustice. Do we really want teacher time to be used on explanations and justifications for what I hope most of us feel to be justifiable subjective decisions?

Access to transcripts, progress reports, comments about struggling students, term grades are all OK, and a goal we should have if only to move toward paperless reporting. But let's please not compromise a teacher's ability to judge each student individually as a human and not just as a number.

Advantages of on-going monitoring...

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I especially agree to Harriett's comment - online gradebooks are fine but if combined with a way to communicate assignments online to parents and students and administrators online with frequent periodicity, grades serve to become something more than a 'result' of learning, but actually begin to affect the learning itself. My students naturally want to find out how they're doing - like moving up levels in a video game - and parents and administrators are also connected and can participate more actively. It takes some discipline, but quickly becomes habit and a time-saver. There's lots out there, but I use Thinkwave (http://www.thinkwave.com/) for an elegant, hassle-free web-based online gradebook. They just came out with a free version, and have excellent administrator systems as well.

kc (not verified)

My view of parents seeing grades online

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I am a student and i think parents being able to see their kid's grades online makes them to judgmental. This has happened to me. I was failing the after the first week of school and it was only because i made a poor grade on the first test (test count for 45 percent of the grade) and without having any homework it really didn't average out because there was no balance of more than 3 assignments. So my parents went on the fritz and took every thing out of my room for 1 month, even though my grade after the test the next week was an A. So I was without my stuff for 3 more weeks which I think was unfair. So instead of parents judging by the the day let them wait for the progress report.

Tess (not verified)

Edline

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I'm a sophmore, with a 3.3 GPA. During the first quarter of my freshman year, I earned straight A's. After that however, my grades sharply declined. That was when Edline was introduced. Every single time a teacher entered a grade incorrectly, I had a missing assignment or something else bringing my grade in a certain class down, it was hell at home. Edline gave me no freedom to tell a white lie, or learn my own mistakes. Isn't that what being a teenager is supposed to be about? Experimentation, failure, and most importantly learning from the experiments, and failures. Edline allows no room to do that. I began to stress more over my parent's reaction to grades than the actual grades. I was striving for an unattainable perfection. Eventually, I attempted suicide. Would you rather have a happy student or a dead one? A happy daughter or a dead daughter?

Bad Student (not verified)

NO! Edline has been

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NO! Edline has been completly ruining my life.
My mom now seems like the enemy. Before edline I got good grades. But now they are absolutly terrible. Every time i get am f or a missing assignmet, I get grounded for a week. I get yelled at every day.
If I have a test tomorrow, I'll study for it.
If I had two, I'd tell my mom i only had 1, study for both, and pass without getting screamed at for an hour.
But no. Now that edline is in my life, there are no more of those little white lies.
It's not fun for the students.
I wish the parents of today would remember their childhood.
It would make it so much easier on us.

Erica Stianchi (not verified)

I would love for my district

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I would love for my district to get this for the elementary schools. Just recently we switched from carbon copy reports cards (yuck!) to a Word formatted report card we print out (still yuck, but better than hand-writing!). It would be so much easier for all involved to publish the grades and comments online. Of course, the site would have to be secure, with only parents and teachers having access using a code or something similar.

Zangle (Sucks balls) (not verified)

There is something called

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There is something called zangle...

I don't think you canadians and europians don't know a thing about it...

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