Should students be graded on their social and emotional learning?

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Reading teacher from Ohio

Your actions speak louder than words ever could

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Ralph Waldo Emerson said "Character is higher than intellect." We teach character education in our school. Some students don't know what it means to be responsible, honest, civic-minded, respecting the rights of others, trustworthy. etc... Being intelligent benifits nobody if you aren't honest as an adult and bring all those qualities to bear in your daily interactions with others. WHo wants to work with a jerk/liar/ (fill in the blank) even if he/she is super smart? nuff said!

Mental Health cum Education Consultant

Very disheartening that even

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Very disheartening that even SEL is being seen requiring grading!
If such scenario happens the motivation towards SEL will fade away.
It will be another chore that a student will be required to carry on.
Let us not do this to them.

Social and emotional

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Social and emotional adjustment at all levels IS important, however, I agree, that assessment is problematic. Students might do some self- assessment using journals--more reflective writing, setting their own personal goals and checking at the end of each term to reflect on their own progress toward those goals. My students work in groups, and discussion of the kinds of emotional/social growth is very interesting, i.e. students are usually harder on themselves than say the adult instructor or school counselor.

Having journalized for years myself, and encouraged students at various levels to do the same--I find that looking back at earlier writing can enlighten us better than some "grade".

Multiple Intelligences and Self Determintation

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I think the whole student should be evaluated using Gardner's multiple intelligences as a guide. We're not recognizing that students who have poor interpersonal skills may experience difficulty in interviews, job roles and their personal lives, which may inhibit their success. I also like the idea of having the student's evaluate their own behavior/social skills.

Emeritus Classroom Teacher (grades 2/3 - 7/8) in South Brunswick, NJ

I think Citizenship may be a

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I think Citizenship may be a part of SEL; but while Citizenship grades tend to have a focus on external controls (we expect kids to follow school and classroom rules, we expect polite listening), SEL moves into internal controls and spontaneous positive behaviors. Compassion, empathy and true respect cannot be imposed -- they come from within.

This is true education -- we are helping students bring out capacities which they already possess and encouraging them to further strengthen and develop those qualities.

Literacy Specialist

Teach the whole child, grade

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Teach the whole child, grade the whole child. However, we need to reassess how we "grade" . I used to give citizenship grades, isn't that the same as SEL?

Mastery Without Shame

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Teaching social-emotional skills is vital, but 'testing' shouldn't be the norm, as this can shame a child. I'm a children's behavioral consultant and have found that when we can embed social-emotional curriculum into the activities of daily schooling and living by using specific language/scripts, through story-telling (esp. our own personal stories), by adressing meaning-making through criticl thinking, by gaining objective insight and skills through metaphoric art and play activities, etc.- and from the earliest years - then we help them learn new 'skills of thinking and doing' that they can internalize without feeling the shame that testing often brings. All children can be involved in mentoring SE skills to the younger-aged students which bolsters their self-esteem and internalization of the skills. Perhaps the most highly skilled SE students can be rewarded/acknowledged by being asked to become mentors to younger groups of children at a different level. Children of all ages get 'in-house' positive role models = big plus. This can be done throughout a Pre-K through 12th grade school(s).

RE: Emeritus Classroom Teacher

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Quote:

I am noticing that many of the posts here are over three years old. Social and emotional learning is crucial to the success of our students. I checked 'maybe' -- here's why.

Our (elementary) schools' report card contains sections titled, "Social Attitudes" and "Work Habits." Students receive a plus, a check or a minus for behaviors such as "Shows respect for other students" and "Abides by classroom and school rules" to "Listens attentively" and "Follows directions."

A number or letter grade simply won't make sense here. (I remember in third grade getting an '80' in Conduct. What does THAT mean?) It makes more sense for the students who frequently use their emotional intelligence in a positive way to receive a plus; for those who are working on it, a check; and those who are not working on it, a minus.

And it would be a good idea to talk with the kids about it ahead of time. Not to threaten a 'bad' grade, but to find out how they think they are doing!

I think most people assume "grade" means a numerical value. However, I would define "grade" as any indicator of student achievement. I would agree that a percent might not be the best value to use. However, most people fall back on it because that is what they are used to.

Private School Owner and Principal

I have been working

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I have been working developing rubrics to measure E.I. in kids, I think as teachers we need to know how to design more strategies to improve behaviors, values and ethics and only watching, observing and taking notes on how students are learning social and emotional principles we will do better practices. Also students will note how they are improving and they will do best each time, not only in school but in their way of living.

Emeritus Classroom Teacher (grades 2/3 - 7/8) in South Brunswick, NJ

I am noticing that many of

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I am noticing that many of the posts here are over three years old. Social and emotional learning is crucial to the success of our students. I checked 'maybe' -- here's why.

Our (elementary) schools' report card contains sections titled, "Social Attitudes" and "Work Habits." Students receive a plus, a check or a minus for behaviors such as "Shows respect for other students" and "Abides by classroom and school rules" to "Listens attentively" and "Follows directions."

A number or letter grade simply won't make sense here. (I remember in third grade getting an '80' in Conduct. What does THAT mean?) It makes more sense for the students who frequently use their emotional intelligence in a positive way to receive a plus; for those who are working on it, a check; and those who are not working on it, a minus.

And it would be a good idea to talk with the kids about it ahead of time. Not to threaten a 'bad' grade, but to find out how they think they are doing!

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