Does skipping a grade help gifted students, or harm them?

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David (not verified)

I benefitted from the foresight of excellent educators

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I was allowed to skip 7th grade at the University of Illinois Laboratory High School in Urbana, IL. I struggled initially, but soon found my way and excelled. I don't see any reason to hold kids back if they are ready to move ahead. We have students of many ability levels in all grades. If students are ahead and learning the same material twice, what is wrong with moving them ahead? The social concerns are largely unfounded according to the research in this area. I know I had very few social issues in skipping grades. Let us not remove the acceleration option from the table because we are afraid. It has been proven effective in most situations. It may be the best option for many of our gifted children.

hello! (not verified)

Wow i love hearing what your

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Wow i love hearing what your saying cause i feel the same way!! awesome keep fighting im with ya

Spike (not verified)

If the premise regarding the

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If the premise regarding the change of focus because of no child left behind is true then skipping a child a grade or more isn't the answer for gifted children. In that scenario, regardless of how many grades a gifted child is advanced, the child will master the material and find themselves in the same circumstance they were in prior to the advancement. The only real difference in the end will be that the child will experience a previously unknown social, emotional, and physical gap with their classmates.

(The above was true even before no child left behind.)

tzippy (not verified)

please dont let them suffer the way I did!!!

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I am a mother of a gifted child myself. I am currently fighting the establishment to let him skip a grade . Because I know what he feels. Even now 11 years after I graduated high school my heart still aches for all the wasted years of my life I spent inschool sitting there doing what the teacher expected EVERYONE to do.
Being unchallenged for the duration of my school years has left me anxious and wanting. As a mother of young children I lost the opportunity to study undisturbed to my heart's content.
I will not let my child go through school with the same results.

Chen Pot (not verified)

.

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Children who skip grades often lack experience and therefore, are naive in the working world. I've noticed this in job interviews as I am an employer.

Bored Anne (not verified)

I completely agree with you.

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I completely agree with you. I get bored in college courses. I want to start my own business someday, but studying management is so boring. I read a management textbook all the way through and passed the entire course with an A (all in a week's time). So, I majored in accounting instead, so I would be challenged. I feel bored already because I finished all of my accounting courses, but the school won't let me graduate without general education courses, etc. I can't wait to get our of college and graduate. Undergraduate work is not challenging enough. Any advice for me?

Lynda Boomer (not verified)

Grade Skipping

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The choices given are too simplistic.

The Iowa Acceleration test has been developed to determine the appropriateness of skipping a grade for a specific student.

Blanket statements such as provided as answers above overlook the complexity of the decision.

LRB

MB (not verified)

There should be an option for

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There should be an option for "It helps. It is pointless to teach a student material he or she already knows. We should advance gifted children to whatever grade matches their abilities as long as they are emotionally and socially prepared to do so."

c (not verified)

I agree that some children

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I agree that some children who claim they are bored could be classified as spoiled. However, I have a 6 year-old who has been reading since he was 3. As a soon to be first grader he is reading Harry Potter and this last year attended first grade for reading and math and several other subjects. If he isn't challenged, even at home he has behavioral problems.

Unfortunately not all children are capable of being self directed as you seem to think they should. Some children aren't creative and don't do well writing stories, and some don't have the creativity to "independently stretch those activities into wonderful, creative products." As a teacher you should know that some kids get it and some don't. And with no child left behind teachers are forced to focus on those who don't get it; which leaves those that get it and more behind. My child is one of those.

I agree that we are blessed to have a free educational system. As for your idea for bored children...and independent research project? A first or second grader typically isn't capable of doing such things and part of the problem is that most children don't feel grateful for what they have until LONG after they have it.

I think our educational system is great and has great potential, however for those children who are advanced or gifted deserve our very best as well. And just because they say they are bored doesn't mean that they don't appreciate what they have. We have a responsibility to educate the bored just as much as those who are struggling.

bored child (not verified)

Bored Children are not Spoiled

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I know I can speak for many gifted kids when I say I'm bored. I had three classes this year that were way too easy for me, and those were Math (Honors Algebra II), Spanish (Honors level 3), and Religion. I had skipped Honors Albebra II my sophomore year, and then for junior year, they put me in it anyway saying that I had to take it, even though I had already learned it on my own. I sat in that class and slept, read, day-dreamed and everything else but listen and got nothing lower than an A on anything except the quiz on the classroom rules. In Spanish, my pronunciation is very good, my understanding is even better, and I can figure out words I've never seen before at first glance because that's what I do. I study words. The other kids are all confused on stuff we learned last year and the year before, and I get A's without studying. And in religion, the teacher gives us the exact questions to the test three weeks before the test. People still fail, and I look over the notes two minutes before the test and get A's. Then the kids complain when he only gives us a study guide and not the actual questions, which I would be fine without already. And it's not just me, a lot of people go through this at school. I can't wait to get out. Slow-learners are never told to fit in and act like they learn like everyone else, so why should fast-learners have to do that? If I wanted to sit around and drool, I really could do that at home, and I wouldn't. I know people say that in other countries, the education is bad, so I should be thankful, but if I'm thanking anyone, it's myself, because everyone else refuses to teach me. I shouldn't be thankful for being forced to sit and be bored, yes BORED, in a classroom full of people that I just don't sympathize with at all, looking at stuff I already know. I wouldn't call myself spoiled, because so far, nothing worthwile has just been handed to me. For the most part, I've taught myself. People say, oh the smart kids can teach themselves, so we don't have to worry, they'll be ok. But I shouldn't have to teach myself. Now of course, I would take some responsibility for my education and stimulate my own brain, and I do. But why can't I sit in some other class and do that? Perhaps a class that is on my level? I wouldn't call us spoiled, since we barely get any attention anyway. People are more worried about the slower kids. So I wouldn't say spoiled, but I would call myself restless and irritable in those easy-A classes.

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