Should schools make financial education a graduation requirement?

Comments (44)

Comment RSS

Financial literacy very important

Was this helpful?
0

With all the hysteria about standardized testing results that impacts school grades and funding, a lot of curriculum has fallen by the wayside. This is all too true if that curriculum isn't on the state test - teach to the test!
I know of honors students taking rigorous coursework and college bound who don't know how to balance a checkbook, figure out APRs for car loans, read apartment rental contracts, etc. Let's face it, they are not being taught at home. I've had kids tell me that their parents don't even balance their checkbooks. Perhaps we wouldn't have had so many people signing loans for mortgages who really couldn't afford them if they only had the financial savy to understand the consequences.
We have curriculum in place to JUST SAY NO, to identify the food pyramid, sex education...why not personal financial education, too?

mmcis-investments.com (not verified)

MMCIS investments is the best investment fund

Was this helpful?
0

Want to have stable and high income, but cannot imagine where to invest your money? We already have an answer to this question - MMCIS is the most profitable decision! Your money will be invested into innovative projects worldwide and you will receive income by times exceeding bank interest rate! We diversify our assets greatly, which allows us to minimize risks. We will make our Fund your reliable partner for years. Make a deposit now and appreciate all benefits of working with our Fund!

Jesse (not verified)

Yeah, I'm the dummy...

Was this helpful?
0

Yeah, I'm the dummy...

I was over at the quarter life crisis message board, a board for twenty somethings trying to break into adult life. I posted a message stating that I thought I would've been way more successful had I been educated in high school about finances, like bills, building credit, credit cards, checking accounts, job applications, loans, budgeting, etc. instead of learning trigonometry or geometry, or some other stuff that would only come in handy when playing Trivial Pursuit. I said I knew how it felt to step out to the real world blindfolded...it sucked!

A lot of people on that board called me dumb, lazy, stupid, etc. And said it wasn't my school's fault that I wasn't properly informed of the real world. Apparently posting topics debating structures in society are stupid, whereas, talking about drinking every weekend, hooking up randomly, and other things that are avoided by anyone with a brain are intelligent conversation!

Yeah...I suck never mind.

Oh, wait! I bought my car in one payment at 18, bought a house at 21, and make $19 an hour. My interest rate on my house is %5.88 and on my second mortgage %7.23. After that second mortgage is paid off, $8,400 to go. I'll pay $592 a month locked in for the 30 years or however long it takes to pay it off. The state average for my state is $1,470. I also don't have any student loans and my credit cards are paid off every month. So, I think I might be doing exceptionally well for my age. I'm 22, and I don't know everything, but I think I know how to be a responsible adult. Please don't think, I am bragging! I am just stating facts!

My conclusion: Some adults are downright dumb if not delusional as to what it takes to be successful in real life.

diane larsen (not verified)

financial literacy

Was this helpful?
0

of course it is an academic subject! involves math,reading,decision making,statistics. the goal of education is to produce capable citizens who have the skills to succeed in "pursuit of hapiness".

Katherine Griffin (not verified)

MUST be taught in schools!

Was this helpful?
0

Elearning would be a good way to reach thousands of students cheaply, effectively, and outside the classroom and the school day.

I am a longtime financial literacy advocate. I led workshops for years, for parents to learn how to teach their kids about money. It is a hard, slow way to change the vector of financial illiteracy in this country. Though parents universally want their kids to be financially literate, few parents are teaching this content, because many parents are themselves struggling with the subject, and because many financially-competent parents don't know how to effectively teach financial skills.

Few schools are teaching this content; No Child Left Behind has placed so much emphasis on core subjects (Science, Reading, Math), that it's increasingly difficult for schools to fiscally justify offering such nonacademic curricula as Financial Literacy. That's why Personal Finance MUST be required in schools.

Young adults 17 to 25 are especially financially vulnerable: with access to credit and loans, they begin making their own financial decisions – and mistakes – at exactly the time when they are beginning to pull away from their parents.

Lillian Lee (not verified)

YES!

Was this helpful?
0

Financial literacy is a life skill. It is as important as tying shoe laces, and should be brought out of the back burner. It is naive to say that these skills can be picked up elsewhere as habits are formed early and we should therefore START YOUNG otherwise we may not even get round to doing it. The argument that making a personal-finance course mandatory may not necessarily improve financial behavior, is but a lame excuse, if not one for those in denial, as awareness can definitely go a long way to preventing silly or bad decisions, that may take years to overcome undesirable consequences. So let's prepare our youths to face reality rationally.

Credit card debt (not verified)

The importance of financial education for children

Was this helpful?
0

I definitely think that these financial courses should be done at any level. Many people complain about handling their finances and they end up blaming the Government or any other financial mechanism eventually. This shouldn't be the case, providing proper education could bring significant improvements in this field.

Shepherd Siegel (not verified)

Financial literacy and career-technical education

Was this helpful?
0

Having a required course like this is a significant opportunity for Career + Technical Education (CTE) teachers to demonstrate how vital the knowledge base they bring to secondary education is. I believe that such a course should be required, and I believe that CTE should be charged with delivering it, and to the very highest standards!

Anonymous (not verified)

That's a great idea,

Was this helpful?
0

That's a great idea, however, Economics is usually taught by Social Studies teachers who have not had Business Economics. Also the Personal Finance component is just a small part of the overall course. A personal finance class should be mandatory before graduation. I am a business teacher, and I taught my own children how to write a check, balance a checkbook, reconcile their bank statements and what exactly it means to have a credit card. Unfortunately, they had to learn by watching their father and I struggle with student loans and credit card debt. I made sure they understood what credit means, and how to use it as a tool, not as a privilege. Today, only my married daughter has a credit card, and she only has it because it was necessary when she was traveling on her honeymoon. Otherwise they pay off their credit card each month, faithfully. They are better at managing their credit than I am.

My point is that not all parents teach their children about credit. We currently have college students who are graduating from college over $40,000 in debit to credit card companies. And that doesn't include their student loan debt. My daughter works at a bank and she tells me stories of people coming in and not knowing how to correctly write a check, how to reconcile their account and what it means to take out a loan. She asks me often - don't they teach money management in school?

rasheka (not verified)

financial planning....

Was this helpful?
0

Financial planning classes should be involved in schools all across the world. Im not sure if it should be an requirement or not, but having the class there would be a good idea for young teens to learn how to manage there money early to help them later on in the real world.

see more see less