Should all students go to college?

Comments (32)

Comment RSS

gap year

Was this helpful?
0

Sounds like more support for a GAP YEAR ...
Americans need to see and learn from the world before they are ready to retire ... then maybe they will have a more realistic outlook on life, and all the opportunities that exist around the globe. By the time they retire and travel the world it is too late to ingrain what is learned by the experience.
There are so many more options that deserve to be investigated ... make getting out and experiencing the world your first big decision.

High School English (Grades 11-12) and Communication (Grades 9-12)

Was this helpful?
0

“I do not want to be a doctor and live by men's diseases, nor a minister to live by their sins, nor a lawyer to live by their quarrels,” he wrote to his mother. “So, I don’t see that there is anything left for me but to be an author.” (©2000-2010 Enotes.com Inc) These words of Nathaniel Hawthorne support that idea that not all are called to serve society in one specific capacity but each is called to seek his own passion. Although Hawthorne received a college education, comparable to a basic education by today's standards, because he desired, he led the way for American authors to stand firm rather than yield their creativity to their British counterparts. A learned technician is of no less skill or import for his profession than a highly degreed physician for his specialty.

Adjunct professor in environmental science at The Art Institute of Charlest

The cost of going to school

Was this helpful?
0

The cost of going to school or BACK to school for another degree, diploma, or certificate is unbelievable. $55,000 for 20 months to become a massage therapist. Couldn't we create more job opportunities with a form of apprenticeship? We need to rethink the cost of education for those professionals with graduate degrees who are unemployed.

Was this helpful?
0

College is not the "cure all" for success in life and neither is money. GENERALLY... the more education you have the more income you will earn. Also, the less likely of being unemployed. But there are many people who have other talents ranging from the arts to technical training who do well in life. There are also many with high degrees who don't have a clue on how to work and keep a job. Never mind the few in the world of academia who have lofty degrees and can speak with words that might impress or confuse us but really don't mean anything.

What is important is to follow your passion and to be a lifelong learner... whether it is at a college or somewhere else in the school of life.

Quote: I know lots of people

Was this helpful?
0
Quote:

I know lots of people who went to college who are now unemployed or unsuccessful. I know plenty of people who didn't go to college, but entered a trade, went to trade school, or went into other careers. They are doing great and are very successful. We need trades people (electricians, plumbers, mechanics, etc.).

A college degree does not always equal knowledge or experience either. How many people do you know with advanced degrees who are clueless about real life, real issues, and how to actually get things done?

College is a great thing for many people. For others it is not.

Many students should enter the work force and grow up a bit before trying college out. They will be more successful that way.

Sounds like supporting evidence for a gap year.

College - Is it what you want?

Was this helpful?
0

[quote]Department of labor statistics tell us that less than 30% of jobs require a college degree but approximately 60% of jobs demand some form of training post-secondary. Rather than preparing all students to go to college we need to help students identify a career path and give them the tools to successfully complete the post-secondary training needed to succeed.[/quote]'
- I 100% agree with this comment. As a recent college graduate I do not feel any closer to "identifying" with a career. I feel victimized by our cultural mindset that college is the answer. College is not THE answer it is a way to an answer, but no where in College are you ever instructed on what it is that YOU WANT to do or get out of this.

All the students realize that

Was this helpful?
0

All the students realize that they are social creatures and they do not exist without society, and university is the stage of social development, and the research papers approve that it is very important and progressive stage.
All the ppl have to pass through this stage, cause it is not only the great life experience but also it is time of volitional decisions and free mind, it's provides you with a fresh mind and extends your horizons!!!

Faculty Developer at Canadian University

College No!

Was this helpful?
0

Teachers have been assuming that College=good jobs=money for years and it isn't true. Plumbers make more than doctors until 40 and continue to make more if they own their own business. They make 4X a teacher's salary lifelong and no student loans. Right now where I live there is a serious shortage of trades people because everyone is pushing for success=college. What a load of educational crap!

We need everyone!

Was this helpful?
0

I love school! I have done school for my whole life. I have a Master's degree and I am preparing to go back for an Doctorate. I still am convinced that this isn't the best way for everyone. We need people to do all jobs. Like most people in the world I have stumbled through my career and I ended up teaching in the Career and Technical Education courses. It was a life changer. Before that I had the idea that I was preparing kids for high school and that would prepare them for college which would set them up for life. WRONG! We have extended adolescence on into the mid-twenties. By perpetuating the philosophy that all students must go to college we inadvertently reinforce the idea that until you are done with school you aren't ready to participate as an adult.

After teaching CTE for 5 years, I have become convinced that we need to do more to get young people working, not doing authentic style work in school, but actually working. By doing this and having supportive educational structures that help students continue learning as they begin working we will better enable them to be involved in our world.

former HS teacher, MEd, Education Administration, mom of 2

The question isn't college, but passion

Was this helpful?
0

Today we have what I call a “deficit” education system. The moment a child enters kindergarten they are tested and we hone in on their deficiencies. If they are in a community that overall tests poorly, they are given an education that is solely focused on raising some mandated test. (A wonderful account of this is Linda Perlstein’s book, Tested.) The arts, recess and school celebrations are marginalized so the teaching staff can focus on some arbitrary score.

However, higher achieving schools don’t necessarily fare any better. Although it is assumed that the children will easily pass the mandated testing, these students are expected to all be “gifted and talented” as parents perceive the slice of the American pie is getting harder and harder to get. Beyond the classroom, they are overscheduled. By middle school, they are already pushed into high school classes and high school, pushed into AP classes. (Again, a wonderful account is Edward Humes’, School of Dreams.)

I taught in a high school that had both extremes. I call it “Yale or Jail”. If placed in the “regular” classes with kids from educationally deficient backgrounds, the curriculum is narrowed into making sure every student can pass the test. To get out of that, a student is taking all AP classes and is overwhelmed with the work. Parents, who can’t change the system, do everything they can to help by hiring tutors, writing papers, etc.

The goal, the seemingly only goal, is to get into college. Yet, we have neglected to help them find out what their true skills and passions are and how those passions can be employable. Worse yet, learning is not a joy, but a chore. And increasingly, for many children an overwhelming struggle. In urban America the dropout rate continues to soar and in many affluent communities, the fall out is still there seen in children with emotional and physical disorders, self-destructive behaviors, etc. (Read Dr. Madeline Levine’s book, The Price of Privilege.)

Today with an unemployment rate is over 10%. Today’s youth can potentially live to be 100 years old. Who knows what jobs are going to be available 50-70 years from now?

see more see less