Edutopia | WHAT WORKS IN EDUCATION The George Lucas Educational Foundation
Facebook
Edutopia on Facebook
Twitter
Edutopia on Twitter
Google+
Edutopia on Google+
Pinterest
Edutopia on Pinterest Follow Me on Pinterest
WHAT WORKS IN EDUCATION The George Lucas Educational Foundation

Resources for Getting Started With Project-Based Learning

Print
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Pinterest
  • Share
Andrew Miller
Explore Edutopia's curated compilation of online resources for understanding and beginning to implement project-based learning.

Comments (5)Sign in or register to postSubscribe to comments via RSS

Linda Keane AIA's picture
Linda Keane AIA
NEXT.cc Director, Prof Arch/EnvDes, School of the Art Institute of Chicago

Ray,
Thanks for compiling these. You might want to include NEXT.cc (http://www.NEXT.cc), a 2012 National Environmental Education Green STEM Innovator and United States Green Building Council Excellence in Green Building Education Awardee. Created by a collaborative team of college art, design and education students, it introduces a thinking and making scaffold of tools, languages, discovery and design opportunities that are linked to NAEEA and NGSS standards. Teachers are using it to develop interest in projects, connections to communities and virtual field trips, museum interactives and contemporary art, science and design practices.

David Andrade's picture
David Andrade
Educator, EdTech Specialist, Education Administrator

These are some great resources for PBL, my personal favorite way of teaching and learning. I really like the dispelling myths and the Common Craft video.

Here are some more:
Project Based Learning Resources for Educators:
http://educationaltechnologyguy.blogspot.com/p/project-based-learning.html

More on WPI and their learning model:
"Lehr und Kunst" or "Theory and Practice." - what we strive for in education
http://educationaltechnologyguy.blogspot.com/2012/01/lehr-und-kunst-or-t...

Laura Thomas's picture
Laura Thomas
Director, Antioch University New England Center for School Renewal, Author of Facilitating Authentic Learning, Director of the Antioch Critical Skills Program

Can I add one more? The Critical Skills Classroom model has some great resources for teachers trying to get started with PBL, particularly if they're interested in teaching and assessing 21st Century Skills at the same time. http://antiochne.edu/acsr/criticalskills

Sign in to comment. Not a member? Register.

Subscribe to RSS

Who Wants to Know? Use Student Questions to Drive Learning

Print
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Pinterest
  • Share
As students get more confident asking questions in class, they'll be better prepared to take their questioning attitude into the world.

Comments (6)Sign in or register to postSubscribe to comments via RSS

Martin Richards's picture
Martin Richards
I train educators to use a coaching approach in their teaching practice

Educators who directly experience how such questions impact their learning, almost immediately start asking them in class.

Farah Najam's picture
Farah Najam
Teacher Trainer and write on education

The questions still reside with the instructor. But to expand the thinking and questioning abilities of students, the questions must reside with the students. I believe that my students need to develop the capability to ask tough and meaningful questions. Some teachers use effective teacher-generated questioning strategies which encourage students to think but not necessarily to become better questioners.

Ahmad Imam's picture

I think every Child has his own world and questions, even it was ridiculous world and silly questions, but there is no child with no questions except in some rare cases of depression, so every teacher must believe that all students have questions and try hard to make them express them, and develop methods that "gradually" prove to students that expressing questions is not bad and help them to learn more.
I mean with gradual methods that the teacher can start with motivating them to express questions like making games that involves this or any other methods, until they realize that this is a good thing and reach the level where they have no fear of questioning and make this normally.

Jesse Pirini's picture
Jesse Pirini
I run www.pencilcase.co.nz a tutoring company in NZ.

Some of the thinking routines that Ron Prichart talks about spring to mind as a good way to get students asking more questions

Whitney Baker's picture

Have been exploring the use of Google Moderator with great success in HS classes. Students create their own questions based on a curricularly aligned topic that I provide. Then, students set out to source and answer each other's questions. GM also neatly provides the means to click on a student's name and view a summary of all of their questions added to a series, or unit. Its really something, I'm amazed at how interested and responsive they are with this medium but as you note, Suzie, they are leading the way which makes all the difference.

I'm keen to take a look at the noted Question Formulation Techniques and try some variations.. ie no answers, edits or stopping - just get as many as you can.

Sign in to comment. Not a member? Register.

Subscribe to RSS

An Educator's Time-Management Strategy: Just Say No

Related Tags: Teacher Development
Print
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Pinterest
  • Share
It's no secret that educators are often stretched thin. Here are some suggestions for saying "no" so you'll have more time to say "yes" to the things that matter.
(3)
Related Tags:

Comments (5)Sign in or register to postSubscribe to comments via RSS

Sarah James's picture

Hey Elena. Thanks for the article. I am sorry that your mantra is changing to "NO". My time management used to be really bad and I couldn't find any time for my hobbies and projects. After few months I finally decided to dig into this problem and I easily discovered that I didn't have a work/life balance. I quit my job and decided to become a freelancer (I am working in the media industries) and be my own boss. I've also started to use a time tracking app (https://www.timeneye.com) that is currently helping me to manage different projects and clients. I have switched from saying no to a a more satisfactory YES!

Jennifer Ringo's picture
Jennifer Ringo
Training Specialist, University of Mississippi Writing Project

Wonderfully written and excellent advice, especially to new teachers. I became much happier when I learned to say "No" respectfully, and often!

Grant Lichtman's picture
Grant Lichtman
Author, speaker, facilitator, "Chief Provocateur"

Thanks, Elena, for bringing this into the language of the teacher. I find more and more senior administrators taking this path, but it is a skill or discipline that all leaders (and I absolutely believe that teachers must be every bit the "leader" as the CEO) can build on. I am halfway through reading "Essentialism" by George McKeown, recommend in a post by Dr. Brett Jacobsen (http://drbrettjacobsen.com/2014/12/29/designing-future/) , head at Mt. Vernon Presbyterian School in Atlanta via Lead + Design...all K-12 folks and organizations that I really respect in the areas of innovation, design, and leadership. The McKeown book is probably longer than it needed to be, but the "essential" elements of the discipline to say "no" to good ideas are there.

Anna Martino's picture
Anna Martino
Librarian for a school library

This is something I have been working on too. It is a good reminder and also good to know that I was not alone in my struggle to say "no." Honestly, just this morning, I was like "I can do it all!" But I can't and that's ok. Thank you for this reminder!

Andrea Hernandez's picture
Andrea Hernandez
Teacher, learner, parent, change-agent… Evolving.

I so super-relate. In fact, this reminded me of something I wrote (on my non-teacher, more personal blog in 2011: Yes or No? https://effortandease.wordpress.com/2011/09/22/yes-or-no/
I like how you have defined your simple criteria for saying yay or nay.
I think a downside of our connected world is just more life-clutter. And those of us who try our best to always do our best sometimes end up hurting ourselves by over-extending. I just read this short piece from Glennon Doyle Melton today about forgiving ourselves when we mess up, and I think this is related as well. http://momastery.com/blog/2015/01/13/parenting-and-life/
By the way, it brought me joy to leave this comment :-)

Sign in to comment. Not a member? Register.

Subscribe to RSS

Caring for Teachers Supports SEL for Students

Print
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Pinterest
  • Share
When school leaders offer such things for teachers as informal colleague mentoring and check-ins on staff wellbeing, social emotional learning for students increases in the classroom.

Comments (2)Sign in or register to postSubscribe to comments via RSS

Alex Shevrin's picture
Alex Shevrin
Teacher/leader & techie at independent, alternative, therapeutic high school

This sounds like a great book. I especially would love to pick it up to see more about the school culture assessment - seems like there are some great questions there to consider. When we're asking staff to support students in social/emotional growth, we have to make sure we're grounded and ready to do that work. Looking forward to your follow-up post.

JessiT's picture

I think this post is spot on; I recently attended a conference in which one of the sessions was focused on this topic. It seems like such an obvious concept, but I continue to find colleagues who are focused solely on teaching content or making kids follow rules. Some say they do not have time to build relationships with their students. It makes so much sense that staff need proper social-emotional support in order to foster SEL with our students. At the same time, I feel a bit discouraged as to how to help other educators see this link when so many are focused on other issues. This book might be an excellent resource to help explain the link between staff and student well-being--thank you for sharing!

Discussion What Did I Assume About My Students' Summers?

Last comment 1 day 1 hour ago in Mental Health

blog A Look Inside the Classroom of the Future

Last comment 14 hours 5 min ago in Education Trends

blog Cracking the Code of Student Emotional Pain

Last comment 6 hours 41 min ago in Brain-Based Learning

blog The Importance of a Healthy Teacher Ego

Last comment 5 days 22 hours ago in Health and Wellness

blog The Value of a Real Apology

Last comment 1 day 8 hours ago in Social and Emotional Learning

Sign in to comment. Not a member? Register.

Subscribe to RSS

Teacher of Year Sean McComb Makes the Case for Optimism

Print
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Pinterest
  • Share
Sean talks with student Juliette German at Patasco High School.
As he makes his way across the country visiting classrooms and meeting policy makers, we catch up with National Teacher of the Year, Sean McComb, in this interview.
(1)

Comments Sign in or register to postSubscribe to comments via RSS

Sign in to comment. Not a member? Register.

Subscribe to RSS

Debunking Myths About Gifted Students

Print
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Pinterest
  • Share
Gifted students do not need scaffolding is just one of the misconceptions that doesn't help teachers or schools reach gifted kids efficiently.

Comments (5)Sign in or register to postSubscribe to comments via RSS

LynneTS's picture

I agree with most of this, but am disturbed by the implication that students whose perfectionist tendencies make it hard for them to submit their work should not be in GATE programs. This is indeed a problem that needs to be addressed, but it is best addressed within the GATE program. Barring them from the GATE program could be emotionally devastating and certainly would not help them. On the other hand, addressing the question of when is your work "good enough" is critical for all the students, whether they are overestimating the quality of their work or underestimating it.

Heather Wolpert - Gawron's picture
Heather Wolpert - Gawron
Middle school teacher by day, educational author/blogger by night

Hey Lynne!
Thanks so much for your input on this. However, I wasn't insinuating that they should be barred from the GATE program. On the contrary, the post was meant to addresses the reality of those designated GATE and encourage teachers to support those students by recognizing that even a GATE student has struggles. I don't think that there are any issues that should only be addressed in GATE programs, however. I think that all teachers (as I say in the end of the post) should have experience and awareness of all demographics.

I hope I've clarified this, and I really appreciate your concern over these kids!

-Heather Wolpert-Gawron

Heather A.'s picture

Don't Know much re Gate but what you are saying resonates. As a K5 teacher the need to individualize is overwhelming. I am stuck, however, in a preset program that basically dictates every minute of my day with my kids. Children with learning styles that widely vary from the norm are to be "tutored". Yet at K level no one is yet "id'd" so instead of using my training and varying my program until they are id'd to allow tutoring and placement or accomodation I spend all my time coping and trying to complete my scripted program and filling out checklist for the future. What a waste of a child's best learning time!!!!

Alex Kluge's picture
Alex Kluge
Dedicated to bringing the best in design and visualization into instruction.

> They might be so compulsive with their work that they never feel it's worthy for submission.
Something else to be on the lookout here, at least with the older students, is the imposter syndrome
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Impostor_syndrome
The work may be fine, or their performance may even be great, but they may be hesitant to share their work, or make public displays or presentations. They just think it isn't as good as everyone else's because they are beginning to understand, and be uncomfortable with, how much they really don't know.

Heather Wolpert - Gawron's picture
Heather Wolpert - Gawron
Middle school teacher by day, educational author/blogger by night

Alex, what a great point! It's so true that as the years to by, some students who clearly comprehended at a higher level from the get-go find it challenge ging when they reach levels that demand more mental sweat equity. Some students who always find academics a challenge can learn strategies of coping with struggles far sooner than those who hit walls later. And you're right, with that can come insecurity that can chip away at confidence enough to feel like an imposter in their own skills. All these points prove that GATE students have struggles, sometimes different struggles, but struggles nonetheless, that make a teacher have to recognize their needs too. Thanks for reminding us about this very important point!

Sign in to comment. Not a member? Register.

Subscribe to RSS

Education Equity: Tackling the Term "At Risk"

Print
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Pinterest
  • Share
Given the opportunity, any student will rise to the level of expectations. Providing students with many opportunities to do so is the key.

Comments (1)Sign in or register to postSubscribe to comments via RSS

Scott I. Goldsmith's picture
Scott I. Goldsmith
School psychologist, licensed counselor, author, blogger, facilitator, trainer and owner of Outside the Box Experiential

Great read! It sounds like something I would have written. We work with the same populations and I share your feelings!

Sign in to comment. Not a member? Register.

Subscribe to RSS

After Ferguson and NY: Holding Space for Sadness, Anger, and Hope

Print
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Pinterest
  • Share
How do we find courage and motivate colleagues to look inward, look outward, and do something about injustices -- in our classrooms, schools, justice system, and society?
(1)

Comments Sign in or register to postSubscribe to comments via RSS

Sign in to comment. Not a member? Register.

Subscribe to RSS

Why Reading Matters: An Interview with a School Leader

Print
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Pinterest
  • Share
An instructional development director from a charter schools network in the San Francisco area shares his plan for acquiring 300 donated digital reading devices for students.
(3)

Comments (11)Sign in or register to postSubscribe to comments via RSS

Karen H.W's picture

In addition to subbing K-12 I also tutor reading. I've debated whether to use devices during my sessions instead of books that I have checked out of the library. I have a 7th grade boy who is struggling with reading comprehension. I meet with him once a week at the San Leandro Main Library where he is surrounded by silent readers and hundreds of books. Am I being " old school" in believing that being surrounded by readers as an incentive trumps the advantages that gadgetry can bring.? I'm willing to find out for myself. Using the Kindle Project as a model .

Farah Najam's picture
Farah Najam
Teacher Trainer and write on education

The kids were basically voting with the mouse, and they were voting for digital. I realized that this is the medium for their generation. It's the medium of the future. I have noticed as a teacher that digital reading products can personalize learning for struggling students and help interest young readers in nonfiction books, an excellent form of personalized learning because students have their own choice of content and access to a library of thousands of books anytime, anywhere. In my class boys are reading more than ever. From the science of basketball to the workings of the human body, young boys have been choosing nonfiction books that spark their interest.

Beverly Choltco-Devlin's picture

Your bashing of libraries and librarians is completely uncalled for, unprofessional, and exhibits an unfounded bias based on decades old stereotypes. School librarians ARE teachers (and your colleagues!-would you say the same about the science classroom or teacher? ) and public librarians play an extremely important role in developing readers, establishing a lifelong love a reading and helping students with reader's advisory. In fact we are trained to do just that. You do a huge disservice to students by dissing libraries and librarians. In fact, in most schools and public libraries, librarians ARE the access point for teaching people how to download e-books and select materials of interest to all patrons. School librarians TEACH information literacy and often provide a safe haven where students can ask about topics they may be afraid to ask their parents or how to evaluate what they find on the web. In addition today's libraries provide a center and safe haven for many students. I would suggest you check your biases and stereotypes at the door before posting such patent untruths and actually visit a dynamic school or public library.

(1)
Ayyoub's picture

Dear Mark Isero; I'm not sure when was the last time you visited a library but your comments about libraries and librarians are just false and offensive.
Your students can benefit a lot more from their public libraries than you may think. While-readers are great and perhaps the future as you describe it, there is still place for everything and remember they are just a tool to access knowledge.

(1)
Amy Young-Buckler's picture
Amy Young-Buckler
Librarian, Meade Heights ES, Anne Arundel County Public Schools

"They don't have to worry about stepping foot in a public library or dealing with old fines, or being talked-to by a librarian. They don't have to check anything out. They don't have to get a library card, or return a book, or take care of it, or worry about losing it."
As a librarian in public schools for the past 18 years, I don't appreciate this bashing of the valuable role that a librarian plays in a school. Libraries give students access to a fuller world than a device. Not all books are available in electronic format. Depending upon the device, they also don't get to see all of the great features that traditional text can provide - illustrations, photographs, design choices that make some books great. I would rather have a student lose a $12 dollar book than a $200 device.

Mark Isero's picture

I am sorry for my comments about librarians and should have chosen my words more carefully. In fact, I value librarians very much and appreciate their role in promoting independent reading.

Here is what I meant to say: My students -- from a few schools in the Bay Area, nearly all of them African American and Latino, nearly all of them the first in their families to go to college -- have told me over and over again that they do not feel comfortable in most libraries. They have felt judged. They have felt fear. They have felt unwelcome. Many libraries, my students have told me, are white spaces for white people.

Therefore, there is a gap between the hard work that librarians do and the lived experiences of some teenagers of color. My ill-chosen words have widened that gap, and for that I apologize. There is more work to do to bridge the divide, and I look forward to contributing to that effort.

Peter's picture

Mark, thank you for this valuable work that you're doing to get kids to read more!! As an urban educator for the past 13 years, I have also heard from my students about how library space is perceived. That is a perspective that is real and while it's also important to shift that narrative, this conversation shouldn't create an issue that really isn't there. Bashing is done deliberately and with ill-will, which is definitely not what is happening here. It's obvious from your Kindle project and the impact that it has had, you have tremendous passion for reading. Thank you for your work and keep it up.

Michele's picture

I thought your words were great.

I am a school librarian at a school with predominately Black and Latino kids. I check books out, ask kids to return books, charge fines when they lose books, check in with kids about what kinds of books they like - things librarians do. Some kids avoid seeing me by staying away from the library. That bums me out, because I think I'm pretty nice and I would enjoy talking to me if I were them. But some of them stay away, for whatever reason.

I don't read your description as vilifying librarians. Not at all! I read your description as understanding that, for some students, there are hurdles to walking into certain institutions that some of us (maybe white folks?) just can not understand. Institutions have always served me well; I'm 100% comfortable walking into a library and asking for help, or looking for a book I need, or looking for something new that might pique my interest. I know how to communicate with people who work at libraries, I have strong reading skills, and I have enough money to pay for something if I lose it or damage it. Other institutions have served me well, too: when I've had to walk into a police station, I've been treated with the respect; when I have attended public school, my administrators and teachers made it clear that they were there for my success.

Your work is helping get young people reap the benefits of reading, without having to clear some hurdles I've never experienced. I'm grateful that someone is looking out for those kids who don't make it to the library. You keep doing your work and I'll keep doing mine, we can continue to help spread the joys of reading.

Beverly Choltco-Devlin's picture

Thank you, Mark, for your reply. I understand that perhaps in your specific situation students may feel uncomfortable in a specific library, but their perceived treatment is an issue for that library and the correlation should not be drawn, as was done here, that all libraries are like that. I am the manager of the Main Library of the Tacoma Public Library in Washington. It is an urban library and we are very welcoming to people of all ages and ethnic and socio-economic backgrounds. To paint all libraries with such a broad stroke is actually doing exactly what you are chastising libraries for doing. If a library is not welcoming to everyone, that specific library is not doing its job. I encourage those students to contact the library manager and the library board of the specific library. I encourage you to seek examples of how the majority of public and school libraries are having a positive impact on young people regardless of background. There are countless examples. You can start by checking out our StoryLab at the Tacoma Public Library on YouTube. Here is a link to our website and our YouTube channel. (Scroll down on the website page) http://storylabtacoma.org/page/2/ and https://www.youtube.com/user/StoryLabTacoma. I do understand how easy it is though to make inferences based on local situations and project those as being universal.

Samer Rabadi's picture
Samer Rabadi
Online Community Manager

Mark, thanks for the clarification. Growing up, I lived in walking distance of two public libraries, and they were both second homes to me. You've opened a window for me into the lives of your students.

I wonder if maybe the Kindles in your classroom can be a bridge to the libraries in your community. If your students learn to love books and learn to love learning, then they'll want to know about the tremendous resources available through their local library.

Folks interested in the future of libraries may find this post interesting: https://www.edutopia.org/blog/21st-century-libraries-learning-commons-be....

Ayyoub's picture

Dear Mark Isero; I'm not sure when was the last time you visited a library but your comments about libraries and librarians are just false and offensive.
Your students can benefit a lot more from their public libraries than you may think. While-readers are great and perhaps the future as you describe it, there is still place for everything and remember they are just a tool to access knowledge.

(1)
Beverly Choltco-Devlin's picture

Your bashing of libraries and librarians is completely uncalled for, unprofessional, and exhibits an unfounded bias based on decades old stereotypes. School librarians ARE teachers (and your colleagues!-would you say the same about the science classroom or teacher? ) and public librarians play an extremely important role in developing readers, establishing a lifelong love a reading and helping students with reader's advisory. In fact we are trained to do just that. You do a huge disservice to students by dissing libraries and librarians. In fact, in most schools and public libraries, librarians ARE the access point for teaching people how to download e-books and select materials of interest to all patrons. School librarians TEACH information literacy and often provide a safe haven where students can ask about topics they may be afraid to ask their parents or how to evaluate what they find on the web. In addition today's libraries provide a center and safe haven for many students. I would suggest you check your biases and stereotypes at the door before posting such patent untruths and actually visit a dynamic school or public library.

(1)

Sign in to comment. Not a member? Register.

Subscribe to RSS

Brown and Garner: Courageous Teaching in Times of Crisis

Print
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Pinterest
  • Share
Following the grand juries decisions in Ferguson and New York to not indict police officers in the deaths of Mike Brown and Eric Garner, educators may think it important to keep their opinions out of discussion so students can form their own.
(1)

Comments (5)Sign in or register to postSubscribe to comments via RSS

Joshua Block's picture
Joshua Block
Humanities teacher at Science Leadership Academy in Philadelphia

Thank you for this wonderful, thoughtful, timely post! It makes me think of Howard Zinn's book (and the film), You Can't Be Neutral on a Moving Train.

(2)
SoundMind's picture

Using phrases such as "what are essentially, as I see it, criminal acts." or comparing the acts in Ferguson and New York to "genocide or the holocaust" indicates a passionate stance on the issue. In this instance I think it would be prudent, and the right thing to do, to take a neutral stance. That is not to say do not discuss the incidents but tread lightly.
What this article seems to advocate is Politics from the Platform (desk). This a dangerous and deplorable thing which should not occur in a classroom. Just because you happen to believe, based on what you have read, that things are a certain way does not mean they are. The word "informed" in the article seems to actually mean "informed and think like, and believe, what I do." Other men and women read the same things and formed other opinions which are no less legitimate than yours. An attempt to sway kids over to "your side", because that is what it is, is not the right thing to do. When there is too much opinion inserted, such as, these are criminal acts, then it becomes the wrong thing to do. Grand Jury may have been wrong but they heard more evidence than anyone else. Should have the two cases gone to trial? I think so but, it is not my place to tell a student that this is the way he or she should think and believe.

Parents? Well, what if parents hear of attempts, in our classrooms, of a teacher who is directly influencing the political opinions of THEIR children. I would suggest that Not being neutral when it comes to racism and intolerance is the right thing to do. The wrong thing to do however, is to sway student political opinion toward your personal side; this has no place in the classroom. Just a thought.

Stacey Goodman's picture
Stacey Goodman
Artist and educator from Oakland, California.

This blog post is not about the specifics of this case, but the decades of, yes, criminal acts by police officers against African Americans and people of color in general. This phase of our history has been thoroughly documented by Michelle Alexander in her book The New Jim Crow http://newjimcrow.com/praise-for-the-new-jim-crow. What is clear in this book is that segregation and the treatment of African American as second class citizens is comparable to other historic atrocities in our history.

This is not about swaying kids to my side or another, but also being clear about what is just, and standing up for what is right. And if teachers only taught what they directly experienced and did not teach what they've read, that would not be considered what most of us would consider an education.

So I ask you, at what historic moment, or what year in our nation's history would you drop the pretense of neutrality? That is not a rhetorical question, but a question directed at you. Would you allow students to debate the merits of Jim Crow? Would you allow students to defend Nixon's bombing of Laos? Would you allow the students to defend the use of chaining and beating naked people without a trial or due process as cited in the recent Torture Report? I mean, really, which side are you on?

Stacey Goodman's picture
Stacey Goodman
Artist and educator from Oakland, California.

Thanks for the positive feedback. I need to see that film - thanks for the recommendation.

Farah Najam's picture
Farah Najam
Teacher Trainer and write on education

The resulting anxieties students--and teachers--take into the classroom in response to a crisis can affect student learning, as documented by psychological, cognitive, and neuroscience research. Individual crises, such as managing with the loss of a family member or recovering from a difficult break-up with a significant other, can affect an individual class member's learning and performance. College students who took part in a journal writing exercise or who listened to a story that addressed themes relevant to the terrorist attacks showed greater improvements and fewer signs of trauma.

Joshua Block's picture
Joshua Block
Humanities teacher at Science Leadership Academy in Philadelphia

Thank you for this wonderful, thoughtful, timely post! It makes me think of Howard Zinn's book (and the film), You Can't Be Neutral on a Moving Train.

(2)

Sign in to comment. Not a member? Register.

Pages