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WHAT WORKS IN EDUCATION The George Lucas Educational Foundation

Resilience and Grit: Resource Roundup

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Explore a curated collection of videos, interviews, and articles from around the web for adults looking to build resilience and grit in young people.

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Allison's picture

Great list. Under 'Grit and Growth Mindset' I'd recommend adding a great TEDx talk on the topic: The Power of Belief, by Eduardo Briceno: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pN34FNbOKXc , as well as Mindset Works' growth mindset theory and practice online course for teachers (http://www.mindsetworks.com/professional-development-and-tools/) and their Brainology curriculum to teach a growth mindset to students (http://www.mindsetworks.com/brainology/), which was also featured in Edutopia's guide for Brain-Based Learning: http://www.edutopia.org/pdfs/guides/edutopia-6-tips-brain-based-learning...

regina davenport's picture

Promoting grit, tenacity, and perseverance, termed the multifaceted concept is a wonderful way of thinking, teaching, and encouraging students to set goals for themselves. I hadn't read anything on this concept, but often thought of how it is important to have these tools to move towards successful completion of anything that is challenging. Student should be taught to use technology as a tool to enhance learning, and I agree that tenacity, grit, and perseverance should be taught right along with technology to help students build character.

Laura Thomas's picture
Laura Thomas
Director, Antioch University New England Center for School Renewal, Author of Facilitating Authentic Learning, Director of the Antioch Critical Skills Program

You might want to add EdWeek Teacher's Teaching Ahead Roundtable on grit.- 5 blog posts responding to the "grit" narrative and teacher preparation. http://blogs.edweek.org/teachers/teaching_ahead/?intc=thed

I also like this: The Poverty Trap: Slack Not Grit Creates Achievement
http://radicalscholarship.wordpress.com/2013/11/10/the-poverty-trap-slac...

and I wrote this, so of course I like it. :-)

Grit and the Critical Skills Program: a Disposition, not a Predetermination
http://antiochcriticalskills.wordpress.com/2014/03/21/grit-and-the-criti...

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Ashley Cronin's picture
Ashley Cronin
Digital Resource Curator

Thanks, Laura. Great resources. Vicki Zakrzewski of the Greater Good Science Center wrote a post recently also, "What's Wrong With Grit?" that discusses some of the questions raised by the grit research.

Donna Volpitta, Ed.D.'s picture
Donna Volpitta, Ed.D.
Founder of The Center for Resilient Leadership

Wonderful list of resources. We wrote a book, The Resilience Formula: A Guide to Proactive, Not Reactive, Parenting, that is available on Amazon and is also a great resource for both parents and educators.

I also do workshops teaching people how to understand the brain in order to make more mindfully resilient decisions. The model that I teach integrates work from Carol Dweck (Growth Mindset), Dan Siegel (Mindsight), and David Rock (Neuroleadership Institute). It is very easy to understand and applies to every challenge from the playground to the board room.

Would love to share the work with Edutopia!

Laura Thomas's picture
Laura Thomas
Director, Antioch University New England Center for School Renewal, Author of Facilitating Authentic Learning, Director of the Antioch Critical Skills Program

You might want to add EdWeek Teacher's Teaching Ahead Roundtable on grit.- 5 blog posts responding to the "grit" narrative and teacher preparation. http://blogs.edweek.org/teachers/teaching_ahead/?intc=thed

I also like this: The Poverty Trap: Slack Not Grit Creates Achievement
http://radicalscholarship.wordpress.com/2013/11/10/the-poverty-trap-slac...

and I wrote this, so of course I like it. :-)

Grit and the Critical Skills Program: a Disposition, not a Predetermination
http://antiochcriticalskills.wordpress.com/2014/03/21/grit-and-the-criti...

(1)

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Resources for Using iPads in Grades 9-12

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Monica Burns
Looking for advice on integrating iPads in high school classrooms? In this curated guide, we’ve compiled resources to help you find apps, learn about best practices, and explore ideas for engaging activities.

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Cheryl Davis's picture
Cheryl Davis
District Curriculum & Instruction Technology Specialist

Thank you for this wonderful curated content on iPad resources for 9-12. Very helpful for high school teachers! Agree, iTunes U is a great place to find fantastic content that students and teachers can access via iPads. I've collected a few samples of courses and books in this course: "iTunes U Courses for High School" https://itunes.apple.com/us/course/itunes-u-courses-for-high/id694393731 It's great that so many teacher are creating and sharing lessons and ideas on implementing mobile technology for learning.

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Monica Burns's picture
Monica Burns
EdTech & Curriculum Consultant, ADE , ClassTechTips.com

Thanks Cheryl for sharing this iTunes U course - such a helpful resource for high school teachers!

Cheryl Davis's picture
Cheryl Davis
District Curriculum & Instruction Technology Specialist

Thank you for this wonderful curated content on iPad resources for 9-12. Very helpful for high school teachers! Agree, iTunes U is a great place to find fantastic content that students and teachers can access via iPads. I've collected a few samples of courses and books in this course: "iTunes U Courses for High School" https://itunes.apple.com/us/course/itunes-u-courses-for-high/id694393731 It's great that so many teacher are creating and sharing lessons and ideas on implementing mobile technology for learning.

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Using Humor in the Classroom

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Edutopia blogger Maurice Elias explains how laughter can reduce stress and offers a handful of teaching activities to lighten up the learning.
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dons's picture
dons
Fifth grade teacher

I teach 5th grade. I play jokes, use games, do silly things. It paves the way for learning. I have to see my students smile. Besides, I want to have fun in school too! :)

Sara Truebridge's picture
Sara Truebridge
Consultant, researcher, and author specializing in the area of resilience, combining my experience and expertise in the areas of research, policy, and practice to promote success and equity for all.

As moderator of the Twitterchat, #resiliencechat, on 3/30/15 we talked about humor and resilience in honor of April Fool's Day. People shared insightful information. Many of the stories about humor in the classroom were absolutely HYSTERICAL!! You can read it all here archived on Storify: https://storify.com/saratruebridge/resiliencechat-3-30-15-w-sara-truebri... ENJOY!

Lessia Bonn's picture
Lessia Bonn
co-founder I am Bullyproof Music

As a person who deals with SEL daily, I have discovered that one of the best tricks of all is teaching kids to find the funny side to dramatic situations. In my library, I have a studio recorded song (featuring the voice of a student and Justin Timberlake's drummer - whose name I won't print because it might leave you in too many stitches, I kid you not,) ELA teaching unit, music videos, and teaching videos taught by kids that all wrap around our song Scary Guy. Too often we let negative people spoil our day with their ridiculous comments. But if we get their first with a quirky positive point of view? They are toast. This is lovely. Absolutely agree! Thank you for the post. Oh, and we have an April Fool's song all about taking love lightly. Throwing that in because of the date today. Have a good one!

Matilda Clark's picture

Love this article - particularly the absolute foundation of 'no hurt' humour. A quotable humour wall is in the making and I am definitely going with humour moments every morning of test week. Thank you all.

FCH's picture
FCH
New Teacher

I believe humor provides a wonderful opportunity to connect with young scholars. An excellent occasion to incorporate humor is during a warm up or anticipatory set. I have observed many educators using their lives to comedic effect during the course of a lesson. Students respond because they recognize that their teacher makes mistakes, even embarrassing ones. But it does help that we, as educators, can laugh and make fun of ourselves.
In a recent discussion for my MSED program, I likened educators to comedians, simply because we are both social commentators. Comedians must stay abreast of current events, or they will lose their credibility. In comparison, teachers must stay abreast of the latest developments in their content area as well as current events that can affect their students' lives. While much of the news in today's world is in a serious vein, there are many offbeat stories that can make anyone smile.

While completing the training requirements for my provisional teaching license, I recall that almost all of our instructors incorporated comics within their lectures. The cartoons provided a mental break from the lesson as well time to reflect on its purpose within the lesson plan. Lately, I discovered Richard Benson's "F in "series of books, which are a collection of some of the best student test exam answers. (Example: To what was Hemingway referring with the quote 'This isn't fun anymore'? Answer: This exam.) I plan to incorporate some of the better responses in my lesson planning, as well as some of the examples Mr. Elias provided in his blog.

Hilary H's picture

I love this topic. We are always teaching to the test. We don't have much time for the "fun stuff" anymore. I teach second grade, and I have to make it interesting. I use humor everyday. I love to laugh with my students. Seeing a smile on their face helps me remember why I am there. I put funny questions, or comments in their tests to that they can even have a little fun while taking a test. I will purposely make a mistake to see them smile.

Natalie Suarez's picture

This topic is absolutely fantastic! I always try to use humor during my class because it always breaks the tension between the students and the teacher. Also, some of my students have told me how they dislike a teacher because they are always "angry" and they never smile. I teach ESOL and I always try to find humorous things from their culture and incorporate it in my class, that way I connect with their culture. Sometimes I do show my students a video at the end of the class of animals doing funny stuff or of a funny part at a cartoon show, but it is always at the end of the class, it encourages them to participate in class and do the work because they look forward to that laugh at the end of the class.

Walden's picture

I teach High school math and try to always incorporate humor in my classroom. Students love humor. It almost makes the forget that they are working on math. I always incorporate it if we are taking notes and write funny things on the notes and whenever I don't, they remind me that I am not. I think that humor brings the best out of people and it always creates a fun atmosphere. I love the fact that even though kids hate math, they always look forward to our class because they know they are going to have a good time when they don't even realize that they are doing math.

Erica Iweanoge's picture

Humor can help students relax in a classroom , usually in the morning just before I start morning meeting I always say that we need to relax and enjoy learning, and I always say something funny and we all have a good laugh, and this helps my students who are timid and afraid to express themselves and be more secure, humor is really refreshing to the student.

Cindy Mae's picture

I always use humor to grab the students attention and engage them in the lesson. Our school day has become so busy and we are not to waste a minute of precious instruction time, that humor seems to fall to the wayside. I think that is sad. We are dealing with kids and a great deal of stress from administration, humor is the perfect release. It helps me to form a relationship of respect with my students.

LizT8's picture

As a way to get my students' attention and set the tone for the day, I post a "Joke of the Day" on my board each morning. When the bell rings I stand by my podium and say, "Everyone, look to the west." Even though they're in 8th grade and know the drill, they'll wait until I direct them, and if I forget or we're interrupted they freak. Some of our best have been the following:
Q: Why does everyone get mad at the nosy pepper?
A: Because he gets jalapeno business.
Q: What did Jay-Z call his girlfriend before they got married?
A: Feyonce
Q: What is brown and rhymes with snoop?
A: Dr. Dre
Q: Is a hippopotamus a hippopotamus or is it just a really cool opotamus? RIP Mitch Hedburg

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Troy Gustafson's picture

I teach US and World history and I like to use Far side cartoons in my slide shows. I would die without humor in my classroom!

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Elizabeth Stewart's picture
Elizabeth Stewart
First Grade Teacher

Great article! I love to laugh with my students! I also love to see their reaction when I am disrupted by laughter during a lesson. They have a look of astonishment as if they are thinking "Wow, she can be silly like us!" I can remember doing my best in school with teachers who used humor in lessons. And I still think of those teachers today. Of course they are the ones who inspired me to become a teacher!

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Luke Zimmermann's picture

No problem. Here are a number of examples from the presentation under headings:

Spelling
Women get marred early.

Wrong word
I learnt to write about 2 chapters and damage it in 1 paragraph.
I learnt how to compare and contrast, problem/solution, causes and effects and graph desecration.
I chose to read short stories because I don't like tall stories.

Grammar
That's mean.
He's like a woman.
Outside world - in a shoe store:
Buy one, get one free.

Collocations
We cooked lunch and ate each other.
Pork flu.
A little bit huge.
AIDS is now very popular in South-East Asia.

And a more creative re-wording:
There is now a better opportunity to get AIDS in South-East Asia.
Similarly: The most famous disease in the UAE is Diabetes.

If you are interested in more, I have been collecting these for many years and put them all in a book "Laugh about English with Luke" which is available on my website.

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Luke Zimmermann's picture

As a teacher of English as a Second Language, I used to collect all the funny mistakes my students made in speaking and writing, and use them as a teaching tool. Of course, you don't name anyone except yourself when you use your own bloopers. What always struck me was that students immediately recognized the errors (and had a good laugh) and then never made the same mistakes again. They often remembered them months later.

When I gave a presentation on this at a large TESOL conference last month, the room was packed to overflowing 10 minutes before I was due to start. "We are just here for the jokes", one teacher said. Teachers are desperate for some humour too.

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Maurice Elias's picture
Maurice Elias
Prof. of Psychology, Director, Rutgers Social-Emotional Learning Lab, Director, the Collaborative Center for Community-Based Research and Service

Fantastic Comments!!

I am very tempted to make a blog out of all the fantastic comments, and may well do so for the start of the next school year. But meanwhile, i want to particularly comment on David's post, which shows that using humor is, as much as anything else, about being relaxed in the classroom, realizing that reaching and engaging all students is the goal, not using one specific pedagogy, and that humor, creativity, and the multiple intelligences beyond verbal-linguistic and logical-mathematical have a powerful place in our classrooms and all other learning environments.

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Mike Raven's picture
Mike Raven
Former Head of Department (Science), Teacher, Brisbane, Qld., Aust

Just to add a couple of thoughts Maurice.

No question, humor is a great tool. But I would be careful not to have it come across as "forced humor" (or go across like a lead balloon) particularly by a teacher who is not initially comfortable with using humor. Otherwise the kids who are very perceptive might begin seeing you as the humor - and perhaps weakening your classroom management and control.

My advice. Start off slowly - create a warm and relaxed atmosphere and then increase the humor. If it is a little weak the kids will be more forgiving because they are comfortable and they "like" you.

I have found that humor does help build a great relationship with a class as long as they understand where the line is drawn (as you said in the article, no "put-downs" please). It really does help engagement and motivation. Also a student loyalty develops - and this rubs-off at home (making parent-teacher night easier !). If your lucky, you may receive a few more presents at Christmas - and have more students come and say goodbye to you at the end of Year 12 !

Some classes, however, might be much more difficult to control and so using humor (no matter how good) could result in you being perceived as an easy target. I'll leave it at that.

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Richard Black's picture

I wear a different tie every day of the year. They are all hanging along a wall in my classroom and a kid chooses my tie each morning. Once this became a thing, I was given ties by people everywhere. Fun times.

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Resources for Using iPads in Grades 6-8

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Monica Burns
Looking for advice on integrating iPads in middle school classrooms? In this curated guide, we’ve compiled resources to help you find apps, learn about best practices, and explore ideas for engaging activities.

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MathyCathy's picture
MathyCathy
Middle School Mathematics Teacher with a 1:1 iPad Classroom in Austin, TX

Additionally, here are just a few ways ThingLink can help with student content-creation, as well as a "table of contents plane" for links that students will easily access, all in one place!

http://www.mathycathy.com/blog/tag/thinglink/

Monica Burns's picture
Monica Burns
EdTech & Curriculum Consultant, ADE , ClassTechTips.com

Thanks Cathy for adding resources for Nearpod and ThingLink - two fantastic tech tools!

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Teacher Appreciation: Planning Resources for Parents

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In preparation for National Teacher Appreciation Month in May, Edutopia has collected tips and ideas for parents looking for the right way to tell educators, “Thank you.”

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Editable Sample Rubric

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Katherine Katter's picture

Biggest problem: Competent is a synonym of Proficient. So I would change that column to "Inadequate" or "Developing."

John S. Thomas's picture
John S. Thomas
First & Second Grade Teacher/Adjunct faculty Antioch University New England

For that column I also like "Partially Proficient" or "Needs Improvement."

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John S. Thomas's picture
John S. Thomas
First & Second Grade Teacher/Adjunct faculty Antioch University New England

For that column I also like "Partially Proficient" or "Needs Improvement."

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15+ Ways of Teaching Every Student to Code (Even Without a Computer)

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Vicki Davis, a computer science teacher and IT integrator, shares this extensive list of year-round resources for teaching students how to code.

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GGJim's picture
GGJim
Account Executive - GG|Interactive

Vicki,

Thanks for the article. I would love to be considered as a resource. We are a game development studio who have created a curriculum for schools to teach game design and game programming. We too are planning some things for schools for the Hour of Code. If you would look at our curriculum and let me know what you think I would appreciate it. our site is www.gginteractive.com .

Thanks again for your article and any input you have for me.

Victor Small Jr's picture
Victor Small Jr
9/10th Grade English Teacher from San Jose, California

I generally use codeacademy.org myself, but snap sounds interesting as well as the other links you posted. Thanks for this.

Fatima Ateeque's picture

Thanks for sharing such a comprehensive list. You might want to check us out as well, we are an edTech Start-up and our focus is to bring Coding to every child across the country. We have put together a week long virtual Coding Camp, and we would love feedback from you. Please do check it out: http://www.knodemy.com/codecamp.php
Our mission is to educate and Give Back to the community too, so for every sign up on our platform, we are delivering an online tutoring lesson to underprivileged schools.

Jeremy Keeshin's picture

Hi Vicki--

Thanks for the great article! My name is Jeremy and I'm one of the co-founders of CodeHS. Just wanted to make sure you could share that with your readers as a great option for teaching the Hour of Code to high schoolers, and then teaching a year long computer science class beyond that.

Here is the hour of code link: http://codehs.com/hourofcode

And here is the site: http://codehs.com

If anyone has questions for us, email hello@codehs.com

Mark Kaercher's picture

As a high school math teacher, an easy tool for coding are the TI graphing calculators. I teach them how to write simple programs that do calculations for all areas of HS math. We have written programs for slope, distance, midpoint, quadratic formula. I also show them how to write a simple guessing game program where the calculator picks a random number and the user tries to guess it. Almost all of the students have a calculator, and they really enjoy the power of writing their own programs.

GGJim's picture
GGJim
Account Executive - GG|Interactive

We actually have made our curriculum free for your schools first year if the teacher or admin signs up by Jan 5th. It is "Computer Science in Game Design" it is roughly 160 hours worth of curriculum, in both design and basic programming. For hour of code we have set up a unique "Massively multi-player coding experience" Where everyone picks a line of code and hopefully they agree on where to make the rat move to find their cheese. Very fun. here is the site if anyone is interested in using it this week for hour of code. Its called code;Rat http://www.gginteractive.com/computer-science-education-week/

Sophia Dumont's picture
Sophia Dumont
Microsoft Developer turned Mom

Apart from apps , I found a series called 'Coding Palz' in Amazon that teaches 3-7 year olds.

The stories are fun filled with beautiful illustrations.

My children love it.

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Resources for Using iPads in Grades 3-5

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Monica Burns
Looking for advice on integrating iPads in grades 3-5? In this curated guide, we've compiled resources to help you find apps, learn about best practices, and explore ideas for engaging activities.

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Elana Leoni's picture
Elana Leoni
Director of Social Media Strategy and Marketing @Edutopia, edcamp organizer

Just came across this list of good elementary apps to use in the classroom and they are all FREE: http://mattbgomez.com/great-apps-for-elementary-2/.

Here's the list if you don't want to click over to the blog:

Brainpop Apps
AR Flashcards: Animal Alphabet
ColAR
ABC Magic Apps
Venn Diagram
Geoboard
Daisy the Dino
Hopscotch App
ABCMouse Apps
Haiku Deck
My Script Calculator
Educreations
Skitch
Class Dojo
Pic Collage
Toontastic
Adobe Voice
ChatterPix
Blokify
Tellagami

Susan Chen's picture

My school has purchased one classroom set of iPads a year ago. We are all eager to make the most use of this investment to further develop our students' skill with technology. It is not enough to have an assortment of apps available for the students to access. This article is helpful in reminding us that we need to choose carefully the apps. We need to consider how and when to best implement the use of technology in the classroom. I will be sharing this article with my school.

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Susan Chen's picture

My school has purchased one classroom set of iPads a year ago. We are all eager to make the most use of this investment to further develop our students' skill with technology. It is not enough to have an assortment of apps available for the students to access. This article is helpful in reminding us that we need to choose carefully the apps. We need to consider how and when to best implement the use of technology in the classroom. I will be sharing this article with my school.

(1)

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Resources for Using iPads in Grades K-2

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Monica Burns
Looking for advice on integrating iPads in K-2 classrooms? In this curated guide, we've compiled resources to help you find apps, learn about best practices, and explore ideas for engaging activities.

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Karen Lirenman's picture
Karen Lirenman
Grade One/Two Teacher from Vancouver, Canada

As an Apple Distiguished Educator, the 2013 ISTE Kay L Bitter Award Winner for Innovation in a PK-2 Classroom, and a grade one teacher who has been 1:1 with iPads for the past two years my students' "go to" apps are pretty much creative open ended ones. Some popular apps include Draw and Tell, Book Creator, My Story, Skitch, Popplet, Pic Collage, EduCreations, Chatterpix, Explain Everything, and iMovie. I have blogged about how we use iPads for choice. I also shared screen shots of my students iPads with direct links to samples of how they have used those apps. My blog can be found at www.learningandsharingwithMsL.blogspot.com . I have also begun to create a K-2 iPad resource on my district's website which can be found here. https://www.surreyschools.ca/sites/E8JU47CFNJ/Pages/default.aspx Please feel free to contact me for more information re using iPads in a k-2 classroom. I am @klirenman on twitter.

Ashley Cronin's picture
Ashley Cronin
Digital Resource Curator

Karen, thanks for reaching out and sharing the info about your blog and K-2 iPad resources site. Very helpful!

Kristi Meeuwse's picture
Kristi Meeuwse
Kindergarten Teacher, Charleston SC

Monica,
Thanks for including my blog in this round up! What an honor! We work diligently in kindergarten to create content and not just consume it. The creation apps we use are very engaging and the kids always produce far more than I ever expect them to. We use Explain Everything, Book Creator, Popplet, Pic Collage, and iMovie the most.

Monica Burns's picture
Monica Burns
EdTech & Curriculum Consultant, ADE , ClassTechTips.com

Thanks Karen and Kristi for adding your favorite apps and helpful links!

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