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WHAT WORKS IN EDUCATION The George Lucas Educational Foundation

Self-Assessment Questions for Social & Emotional Development

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Classroom-Management Tips Pinterest Board

Related Tags: Classroom Management
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Guidelines for Quiet Time and Silent Sustained Reading

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How to Remember Names

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7 Learning Zones Every Classroom Must Have!

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Lynda Pilgreen's picture

Great ideas! Unfortunately many seem to be for elementary classes. I'd like to try a few in my high school class (of 30 not 20!) but would love some feedback on how these work in hs

(3)
Joan Arbisi Little's picture
Joan Arbisi Little
Education Consultant

When I looked at this graphic I was inspired to think of each of these zones as themes for different rooms.

I am working with a group of innovators to create a K-8 school for 150 students that is multiage and focused on personalized learning strongly supported by e-gaming. Students will move freely from area to area during 6 interdisciplinary blocks throughout the day.

We are in the process of securing a building that has some very large and very small work areas. After seeing this I think each room could be focused on one to three learning zones.

Thanks for the inspiration!

Denise Turner's picture

I teach middle and high school math levels. Can anyone help me brainstorm how the 7 zones can be created into my levels... I agree with Lynda (above). I need something with the higher levels.

Brian Sztabnik's picture
Brian Sztabnik
AP Literature teacher from Miller Place, NY

These are great tips but I do see how they need to be tweaked for the secondary level. I think the spirit of each of the 7 zones can be retained but they need not be physical spaces. Some can be elements of a god lesson plan. For example, the discovery zone can become an instance I which teachers use effective models during a lesson. The community zone can transform into informal assessment opportunities to modify instructional practices to improve student performance.

Laura Bradley, MA, NBCT's picture
Laura Bradley, MA, NBCT
Middle school English/Digital Media teacher

Hi Denise and Lynda! I agree -- there isn't room in my middle school English classroom to have separate zones for all these needs, but part of my routine is giving students clear expectations for how certain areas of the classroom are used, and for various kinds of lessons. For instance, a table at the front of our room holds stacking trays for each class period and a basket of staplers so that students know where to go to turn in their work. A windowsill in the back of the room has containers of bookmarks, rulers and scissors. I have two extra chairs and a small table in one corner where I can meet with students. It's a tiny area, but since it is away from my teacher-desk, I think it's less intimidating for meeting with kids. I try to make sure my whiteboard is used in a way to help students be organized: one side always has the date and day's agenda, while the other side always has the homework and due dates posted. While the ideal classroom would be large enough (and have a variety of furniture) to provide all those great learning zones, in the real world I think it comes down to organization and communication of how we use our spaces.

Lynda Pilgreen's picture

Great ideas! Unfortunately many seem to be for elementary classes. I'd like to try a few in my high school class (of 30 not 20!) but would love some feedback on how these work in hs

(3)

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53 Ways to Check for Understanding

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Dr. Tom Mawhinney's picture
Dr. Tom Mawhinney
Touro College professor teaching graduate education courses

Formative assessments are only good if you use them to alter your teaching or for students to adjust their learning. Too often, I've seen exit tickets used and nothing is done with the results.

(1)
Elana Leoni's picture
Elana Leoni
Director of Social Media Strategy and Marketing @Edutopia, edcamp organizer

Really great point Tom -- I know many teachers that set aside extra time for interpretation and reflection of results before (otherwise it may not happen!).

For those of you that want more of formative assessment, one of my favorite resources lists TONS (50+) of examples and many of them can be done quite quickly! https://www.edutopia.org/groups/assessment/250941.

(1)
Robyn Hill's picture

This is great, I will be hanging mine next to my desk. Too often we use one type of formative assessment without considering multiple intelligence or preferred learning styles. This also works for introvert/extroverts. This is exactly what allows all students to express their learning in a manner that highlights their strengths rather than limiting them to areas of weakness or discomfort.

John S. Thomas's picture
John S. Thomas
First & Second Grade Teacher/Adjunct faculty Antioch University New England

Well said, Robyn. Thanks for including those of us who have alternative learning styles. ;)

Leslie Brennan's picture

I think that is very interesting that you said nothing is done with the results. I am addicted to Math and Writing Exit Slips. Once they complete them, I keep the "Didn't get it" exit slips for skill grouping, and the "Got it" the students put it in their math or writing journals to use for resources. It is one of my most favorite mini quick assessments to use with my 4th graders. Skill grouping is TRULY a must in all classrooms. I truly get to know my students by heart this way (besides conferences). Good points!

SUZETTE's picture

Great resource! Many of these I do, but you have given me a different way of gathering information; checking for understanding. I too keep exit tickets to use for small group instruction for those who need extra help. Thanks for the article.

Andrea's picture

@ Leslie thank you for keeping the exit tickets for skill grouping suggestion.

Nancy Lynch's picture

I am going to cite this article in a double entry journal I have to do for a class. There are some interesting tips in this article

Elana Leoni's picture
Elana Leoni
Director of Social Media Strategy and Marketing @Edutopia, edcamp organizer

Really great point Tom -- I know many teachers that set aside extra time for interpretation and reflection of results before (otherwise it may not happen!).

For those of you that want more of formative assessment, one of my favorite resources lists TONS (50+) of examples and many of them can be done quite quickly! https://www.edutopia.org/groups/assessment/250941.

(1)
Dr. Tom Mawhinney's picture
Dr. Tom Mawhinney
Touro College professor teaching graduate education courses

Formative assessments are only good if you use them to alter your teaching or for students to adjust their learning. Too often, I've seen exit tickets used and nothing is done with the results.

(1)

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Daily Planning Worksheet

Related Tags: Professional Development
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T.C.'s picture
T.C.
Special Education Teacher

Samer, thank you for the info on the Coursera course.

Lee Johnson's picture

That course has been very helpful to me. It is self paced so you can start and move along as your schedule allows. Although I should schedule it in on my worksheet since I have not finished it.

Andie Davis, MEd, MSEd's picture
Andie Davis, MEd, MSEd
High School ELA Teacher, Delaware

I use something similar in a pre-made book to record where in the lesson each of my classes left off and to make notes about changes or materials that I need to have for next time. I use the spaces at the bottom for lesson/weekly reflections to help me improve the units next year.

Kari Williams's picture

I like tips on planning in for the hallway rush and also plan a meeting with yourself! 2 great ideas that will keep me on track

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What Does Transformational Teaching Look Like?

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Lesson Planning Pinterest Board

Related Tags: Curriculum Planning
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