Are plugged-in kids multitasking too much?

Yes. Students who are on technological overdrive lose their ability to think deeply and critically.
54% (209 votes)
Maybe. Though there is some decrease in attention span, most students can easily switch from multitasking mode to a more sustained focus when needed.
35% (137 votes)
No. Technological multitasking is a critical skill that only enhances students' ability to learn.
11% (41 votes)
Total votes: 387

Comments (14)

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Linda McClellan (not verified)

I don't worry so much about

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I agree completely. Children are given too much time alone with technology and not enough play time. We are allowing our policy makers to make rules and regulations that are not allowing our children time to grow and play. And parents are jumping on the bandwagon, not realizing what they are doing to their own children.

Vaughan Johnson (not verified)

I don't worry so much about

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I don't worry so much about attention span as what these kids are missing by obsessing over tweets and IMs. It pains me to go out to a play or dinner and see kids sitting at a table with their cell phone in their hands, completely oblivious to their families or their surroundings. I went to our school's 4th grade concert and there was a group of older brothers and sisters in the back completely ignoring their younger siblings performance. I'm all for ease of access for information and communication but we need to teach them to turn it off every now and then. Nothing a 13 year old has to say is so monumental that it can't wait an hour so that they can enjoy their surroundings.

Don Berg (not verified)

The Myth of Multitasking

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Here's a perspective to consider:

Our brains are not actually capable of "multi-tasking." What we call multitasking is actually rapidly switching from task to task, which has the result of diminishing our ability to think clearly about each task. Since we have a limited perceptual and cognitive bandwidth as human beings and each switch actually demands extra bandwidth, the net result is a loss of quality for each task.

Here's a video that explains it:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a5vRMgw6pk4

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Enjoy,

Don Berg

Site: www.Teach-Kids-Attitude-1st.com
Blog: blog.Attitutor.com

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