What is the most effective way to teach English-language learners?

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akhil agarwal (not verified)

firstly talk with them only

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firstly talk with them only in english and very much in slow talk.teach them auxillary grammar and within 6 months you will see them rising

Catherine Peacock (not verified)

Teaching English

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This website has some games and other lesson plans that may be appropriate. It depends on the age of the children. It takes at least five years to acquire proficiency in the English language, just as it does in learning any other foreign language for non-English speakers. I hope this helps. http://www.englishclub.com/esl-games/

karen (not verified)

English

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I would like to know how to teach an english with playgroup kids so that they would learn fast..

Aracely (not verified)

Why we must have bilingual programs

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I think we have to keep in mind that if a student has mastered any language in their native tounge, this will facilitate them to acquire a second language. The problem is that when a student does not have a solid foundation in their native language, (those building blocks are essential to acquire the second language) then it is extremely hard to grasp the concepts. And this is where students fall. If they are familiar with the concepts, then they are able to translate it with no problem to the second language. That is why bilingual programs are esential.

What works best for English language learners is the dual language program. This is where they get their language arts and reading in their native tongue, because this is the core of all the other subjects. Your classroom should have 50% English speakers and 50% of speakers of the other language to be successful. I have worked with this model and I have seen amazing things...

Anonymous (not verified)

what to teach in first second and third grade

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I am a teacher, I teach from playgroup to fourth graders. In Chile we have planifications from fifth graders up but not for the mentioned above. I would like to know what to teach in each level, to emphasize what they really must manage in each level. Please let me know the best wy of doing it by mentioning the topics for each level or mailing me a web page from which I could obtain the material. I'll be waiting for your response. My children have a very basic almost non-english so It must be very very basic.
Thanks in advance for your help.
Thanks
Veronica

Sari Lestari (not verified)

I'am a new english teacher

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I'am a new english teacher for children first grade of elementary school only for private and I would like to ask you all what the best thing to teach English
fethi-bendahmane (not verified)

Reading the most previous

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Reading the most previous posters,I consider myself a learner from their opinions. yet I will be very honoured to receive helpful literary and pedagogical materials. I have been teaching English for more than eight years. I have tried high and low to make my pupils grasp the English language , however I concluded that the parents role is vital in providing their children with the necessary documents and materials to obtain a remarkable level . No doubt that the state's policy towards English in paticular plays the major role to make the acquisition effective. As far as my own method in teaching the foreign languages is concerned, the implication of the mother language is worth using.
John D. Williams (not verified)

This posting serves as an

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This posting serves as an essay on the above comments for an inservice class about Spanish communication. I am a high school Earth Science teacher on Long Island NY, and have classes combining Latino, Euro, and Afro descended students, and, increasingly each year, students that are blendings of these and other ethnicities. Fewer each year speak the "Queen's English" as they meet me, yet this is the language of our Regents test as it is now. I am on the Regents writing committee and advocate simplifying the language, without compromising the science. I find myself spending time showing students how to be efficient readers, to get to the real question and information, then to begin their attempt at answering. Tellingly for the Latino population, much of the language for Earth science has real overlap-- for example, condensation and condensacion, precipitation and precipitacion, rocks and rocas, etc. Others are explainable with reference to Latin roots-- earthquake as "terra morto" means "ground death." Curiously, I find all my students listening closely when I explain language in this way. There are many overlaps, and I know that science has an advantage in this regard. And for those who speak different forms of English, the key words are the same. I do not believe in any kind of segregation. Reading the above comments, I find that, even though I've been through teacher education, it is not now clear to me what exactly everone is referring to with special bilingual, partial inclusion, semi-immersion, and the other names of programs. I agree that students in Latino communities have little incentive to learn English, so why continue that segregation more than it is now? Immersion science classrooms, to be most successful, would have to operate more and more with just the basic vocabulary of science, which would make tests more like matching systems at first, then to further develop concepts so that the student could show mastery. I have tried some of these techniques with some success. I agree with the comment that students in need, of any academic kind, should be made to spend more hours on instruction, and that this should become policy, either as Saturday school or after school. This could be in the form of an entrance examination for English proficiency. From the student's view, it might be an incentive to improve rapidly, to lessen work hours. I use a form of this in my classroom, where homework is not for everyone, but can be graduated out of with increasing proficiency-- in other words, the 80s and 90s students can have less homework. It is popular and talked about. I know that, at any level-- state, local administration, teacher-- we try our best. Controversial topics usually have the most variables. To summarize what I have stated above, so that the reader can decide on this essay's benefit: 1. Immersion and mixed ability classes are better, if only to lessen feelings of segregation. 2. Teachers should show students how to be better test takers, simplifying the reading of questions and emphasizing key and language-overlap words. 3. Immigrating students should be given entrance exams in English and, if necessary, assigned EXTRA classes and time in addition to their regular classes. This EXTRA time is also for other failing students. 4. There is nothing equal to "raising the bar." John D. Williams February 2007 motiheal@yahoo.com
Dew (not verified)

I'm in a quandry about how,

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I'm in a quandry about how, if at all, sensitive topics like 9/11, Darfur, Rawanda can be addressed in an adult ESL class. There appears to be a lot of mixed emotions about this. Recently, in an ESL class I observed, a teacher was criticized for talking about 9/11 which coincided on the day of 9/11. She simply made a part of her lesson to say 'When it happened I was. . . It turned out that many of the students had a lot to say about it and proved to be a good exercise, withou it becoming too intense. I would really like to know what your opinion is on this. Anyone! I personally think it is alright, along as people do not pass judgement or criticize anyone. It is something that affected everyone in the world so why shouldn't it be brought up?
Bob Eldridge (not verified)

I teach mathematics to

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I teach mathematics to children (Grades 5-8) in northern New Jersey. I have seen students enter our bi-lingual program and be mainstreamed within a year. On the other hand, I have seen students who remain in the bi-lingual program for many more years than necessary because they have no motivation to learn English. They only associate with other students who speak their language, live in neighborhoods where they can get along perfectly well without learning English, and therefore, have no real need to learn the language. For these students, the bi-ligual program provides a "cocoon" by permitting these children to avoid dealing with the need to learn English. I would like to see a program in our schools that involves immersion into regular classes immediately with support for those students who need it. I spoke about this with my wife, who is a high school Spanish teacher on Long Island (NY). Some of her colleagues live in a district on Long Island that has an innovative program. (Commack, NY?) It is a special bilingual program that has classes made up of bilingual and English speaking students. Parents of English speaking students must apply to have their children placed into this class. Instruction is provided in both English and Spanish and therefore English speaking students are semi-immersed in Spanish and Spanish speaking students (who comprise most of the foreign born students in the district) are semi-immersed in English. One of the two colleagues who has enrolled his/her children, is also a Spanish teacher (native born) and is happy that his native language as well as English is being reinforced in regular school instruction. The other colleague is not a Spanish teacher and is happy that her daughter is speaking Spanish through this immersion program. Imagine receiving instruction in your science, social studies or math class in two languages!
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