Congressman George Miller's Take on NCLB: Part 1

Comments (6)

Comment RSS
Jessica P. Boise, ID (not verified)

NCLB - Highly Qualified Teachers

Was this helpful?
0

All I have to say to people like Jennie is if you think being a teacher is so easy...sign up and get into the classroom. It sounds like you have plenty of time on your hands since you home school 1 student (your son) and you obviously have the "gift" to motivate and encourage since your one and only student is getting A's and B's. We have "highly qualified" teacher standards so we don't end up with people like you that "think" they can do it better. When you go to the doctors, do you go to someone who is qualified to treat you or to someone that simply has a knack for medicine? We should all feel lucky that people are still going to college to become teachers. These are the people that love kids and have made a conscience decision to making a difference in the lives of our children and system. These are the people that make less a year than their student loans when they reach a classroom. These are the people that we should be supporting instead of demeaning! It's not the teachers' fault that NCLB required "highly qualified" teachers to be teaching our children. Nor is it this requirement that made teachers unsupportive, disrespectful, or unmotivating towards students. The teachers who are this way were this way before NCLB and will continue to be this way after NCLB. I don't think your comments are fair or accurate towards teachers or NCLB. How would you like it if people criticized you on your parenting skills? It sure sounds like you have the means to get your son into an arts school that would nurture his gift of music and the arts. So who's ultimately responsible for your son's success...YOU or the system? Instead of continuing to beat the "system" down put your time to better use by volunteering or tutoring at a low income school. Hopefully you'll see that teachers have much more to deal with than just teaching.

Jennie Davis (not verified)

NCLB - a terrible failure

Was this helpful?
0

Everyone seems to think that the "dropouts" of 40% and higher are only the poor, minority students. I can give you proof that it is a much deeper problem than this. My son, 10th grade, 16 years old ... failing high school horribly. He comes from a two parent home, no divorces, no drug issues, no alcohol issues with him or in the home, dad is a mental health professional, mom is primarily stay-at-home / PTA president, child has had tutoring, been in Gifted classes, incredibly gifted in music and arts, but is bored out of his skull with day to day learning in the broken system we call school. These so called highly qualified teachers are pathetic when it comes to motivating a non-motivated student. Those who could learn without a teacher present will continue to do fine. Fortunately for our son, we have the options of removing him from school to home school him. Grades have shot up from failing to a's and b's. Give me less "highly qualified" certified teachers and more teachers who simply have the gift of teaching, who love kids, who are motivators, and encouragers, who help students find direction, who respect the students. I'm sick of the experts thinking they have the answers when all the while they continue to make is worse.

Anonymous (not verified)

The problem of student mobility

Was this helpful?
0

The problem of student mobility is a problem that many schools in California have because of the high migrant population. Students that check in and out of school constantly are a problem for teachers who must assess and evaluate their individual needs and levels. They must often try to catch up students who may have not been in school for sometimes two or more years, and often not continuously. This must be done often for many students at many times in the year while trying to maintain the rigor of the course for the other students. This is a very exhausting juggling act. These students are then often counted as a mark against the teacher in terms of standardized testing criteria. Often the teacher has done an incredible job but this will never show in the current growth models under NCLB.

Anonymous (not verified)

You wake up

Was this helpful?
0

Blaming the parents is a very old and tired excuse. We do not have the liberty of deciding which child is in an "impossible to overcome" situation. A lot of very smart people put a lot of thought into NCLB. I don't believe that they made this decision arbitrarily. The fact is, excellent schools and excellent teachers find ways to overcome the effects of seemingly impossible situations. It comes down to whether the school has the will and the courage to do the things that they know are necessary to make a difference.

Any public school teacher who blames their school’s problems on “one or two minority groups” needs to think a little deeper about what this country has set out to accomplish. We all know there are a lot of negative things going on in this country. The children in our classrooms are a reflection of society at large. But where do we begin to break the cycles of ignorance and poverty? Is it too much to ask that every child who spends a year in a classroom be able to demonstrate that he or she has achieved minimum competency on a given set of instructional standards? I don’t think so.

Anonymous (not verified)

wake up

Was this helpful?
0

NCLB is a good in many ways. However, it is completely unrealistic in many ways. NCLB will do wonders once it realizes that teachers cannot overcome what neglectful parents mess up quickly. Some of the suggestions stated above as far as adequate yearly progress seem to address that to some extent. However, that is just the beginning. As a teacher, I grow weary of working very hard and seeing all of my students make progress, but see my school get slapped with a low performing label because a certain percentage of one or two minority groups didn't perform to this year's percentage requirement. All the while, Johnny's mom yells at me about why his or her work is too hard and why he's failing.

In summary, NCLB is a wonderful idea in principle, but the practicalities of the situation require an entrance as well. Those praciticalities are simply that not every child will be on level. Some children take more time to learn things. Some children come from such difficult circumstances which to some degree can be overcome by a good teacher at the higher grade levels, but is impossible to overcome at lower grade levels.

Anonymous (not verified)

This was very realistic. I

Was this helpful?
0

This was very realistic. I think he is right, that we are not going to get NCLB funding and it is something that we should be working towards anyway. However, setting specific goals to make people feel better, is not going to help. We can make a difference if we do start looking a authentic instruction and assessment. teaching math through music or woodshop would make a big difference to a lot of students!!

see more see less