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cheap computers (not verified)

Sometimes We Can Do Great Things with Fewer Things

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It was very expensive, more than a basic PC costs today, and i wondered aloud if it was worth it.

Ron (not verified)

Glen's question about printer

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Glen,

It depends on what operating system you are using, but basically, you have to add the printer using the computer's preferences. The printer has an IP, which you must use to identify it to the computer.

Glen (not verified)

how can I get my second computer to recognize a new Canon MP600

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My two computers are connected together by Linksys. Problem is I have a new Canon MP600 printer on the main computer and can not get the second computer to recognize the printer.
What do I do to get both computers to print on the computer. It worked when I had an Epson printer, but I had the second computer hard disk wiped clean.
Can you help me?

Ron Smith (not verified)

I bought my first computer

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I bought my first computer seven years ago. I had been a photographer, and I used (I still have them) three wooden cameras. I am as technical as I have to be. I, too, want the thing to just work. I'm using Suse 10.1 (10.2 has just been released), but I started with Ubuntu. Both are very easy to install, and they recognize peripherals readily. The problem with Windows, and to a lesser extent Mac OSX, is twofold: first, they are expensive--to buy, to add other programs to, to maintain; second, they require a great deal of "geekness" to realize their full potential, and the only way to get help is to go, hat-in-hand, to the company masters. Linux, by contrast, was born out of the idea of community. I don't need to know how to do everything with the OS, just what I want. When my needs change, I look to the community for answers, and I have never been disappointed. The only really "proven" thing about Windows is that it is a security nightmare! I often use the car analogy when I teach web design. I, too, just want to put the car in drive and go. It is a basic tenet of usability, best explained by Steve Krug in his book Don't Make Me Think (http://www.sensible.com/chapter.html ). Linux is a bullet-proof, solid operating system that makes sense. Indeed, Brazil, which has recently become energy independent, too, has gone entirely open source (http://www.wired.com/news/infostructure/0,1377,61257,00.html ). We here in the United States seem wedded to big corporate interests because we always have been. Third-world countries are taking the lead precisely because they cannot afford to buy expensive American products, so they opt for free alternatives. I have often challenged school administrators to try something new, only to be told that change was not in the cards because, "That's the way we've always done it". It seems to me that that is the absolute worst reason to do anything.
Isaac (not verified)

try Ubuntu and Edubuntu

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try Ubuntu and Edubuntu version, Linux for human beings.
Ken Messersmith (not verified)

My question is whether Linux

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My question is whether Linux has gotten easier to install and use. About 5 years ago I tried to instiall Linux and found that it would not automatically recognize my printer, scanner, camera, etc. like Windows does. You had to be pretty geeky to make it work. I also tried out the free Office clone and the Photoshop wannabe and they did not have the functionality I was used to getting with Windows. It would be great if schools could use a free OS and software but it will have to get much easier to install and use before I will convert. If someone would walk into my office with a fully loaded computer and I could plug in my printer, camera, scanner, and other devices and have them work out of the box just like my Windows machine, I would be interested. Until that time I plan to stay with my proven software. I would be interested in hearing from a "non geek" who has made the free stuff work.
Randy (not verified)

I think the idea of Linux is

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I think the idea of Linux is great - but applying the less is more analogy might not be so great. From my late-adopter perch I still see Linux as something that innovators are using but have yet to see it filter down to the masses. I am a computer user much like I am a car user - I do not spend hours pimping my ride or with my head under the hood. I get in, turn the key and drive. Every 3000 miles I get an oil change. That's how I want to use computers - turn them on and they work. If Linux is at that point I'm ready to adopt - however if I still need to be a big problem solver in order to use it, I'm just not ready to take that time. I appreciate the innovators taking all this on - and I hope eventually it will reach the late adopters (and even the laggards). I'm all for a custom OS that will save schools money and allow greater access to great technology for all (ALL!) students.
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