I would use technology, or more technology, in the classroom if . . .

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Tiffany (not verified)

If the "glitches" didn't

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If the "glitches" didn't take up so much teaching time. Glitches: computers freezing, bumped off internet, not enough memory, not the right downloads...... Give me a break!
Joan K (not verified)

Teachers would use

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Teachers would use technology regularly and freely if equipment were permanently set up in the classrooms. In our building, many devices that would make technology palatable to use, such as projectors and white boards, need to be ordered ahead and then set up before a class to use it. If projectors were ceiling mounted and connected to computers at all times, or if Smart Boards were in every room and already calibrated and cabled up, it would make a big difference in the ease with which teachers would use it.
Julie Effertz (not verified)

Sure, I'd love to use a TON

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Sure, I'd love to use a TON more technology....if I could just get my hands on some equipment! Teaching at a small, urban public school of about 300 (and yes, that's tiny in our school district), the funding just isn't there. For example, this year, I have a science class of 35 students, and 2 working microscopes. So how can I teach cellular biology? The solution is simple...just use a computer to project what cells look like under a microscope. The problem? NO projector...and no decent laptop to use with a projector if I had one. A smartboard? Would love one of those too...but begging for the past 3 years hasn't worked. I'm working on my master's degree right now and the university has all these amazing document cameras that work like an overhead projector but project anything...what I wouldn't do for one of those! Before you say it, I've looked for grants. There are 'programs' available by manufacturers that offer discounts for technology for classrooms...but even at 50% off, I can't get my hands on the 50% that I have to pay! As for other grants the problem is most grants want some amazing, revolutionary educational project...I don't need funding for a project...I need funding for just some basic equipment! Heck...I'm still trying to find a way to get a class set of goggles for my science lab! Although I'm in a major metropolitan school district (about 100K students), the funding just doesn't seem to ever filter down to the classrooms. With so many teachers techologically-phobic, you'd think the ones that weren't would be able to get their hands on the technology they're willing to use. Well, it's a nice dream anyway (sigh). So I'll just keep looking for grants...and playing the lottery.
Doretta (not verified)

We have a computer lab. The

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We have a computer lab. The one year I could successfully use it, I booked it for 2 consecutive hours a week, one was during my long plan time, so I could get all the computers turned on, logged on to the network, make sure the lesson I wanted to do was accessible. Of course I had first graders, and no computer teacher, just me to take care of 25 computers and students. I really didn't like giving up my long plan time, but I could do a successful and integrated lesson on those days. Now, we just go in to practice keyboarding and learn about the different program applications. Waste of instructional time.
Glen L. Bledsoe (not verified)

I use and have used

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I use and have used technology in my classrooms since 1991, the first day I became a teacher. But the longer I teach, the more I see tech support and adminstration restricting the use of technology in education. School districts shouldn't be in the business of buying hardware and software anyway. My thinking is that teachers should bring their own technology to school and be paid to do so. That way tech support can't prevent teachers from exploring software apps which aren't on the "approved" list. It would be a win-win in that tech support can merely provide connectivity and not have to be concerned about my hardware-software. They don't directly pay for my car or change its oil, after all.
Sue Long (not verified)

As the technology

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As the technology coordinator for a small school district in New Jersey, it's part of my job to encourage teachers to use technology in their classrooms. I have found that for many of them using technology is perceived as risky. They believe that their students are more proficient with the computers than they are, so they are losing authority by venturing into a realm where they are not the experts. They are afraid that something will go wrong that they won't know how to deal with. And they don't see enough value in the technology tools to make the effort worth the risk.
C. Nelson (not verified)

I have always been a user of

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I have always been a user of the technology available in my school. As a library media specialist, I feel that I should model appropriate use and integration, as well as best practice in using hardware and software. I also try to embed ethical and legal use, as well as information literacy skills in there too. Many of my fellow teachers look to me to assist them with projects that hinge on using technology, but instead of doing things for them, I try to get them to learn by doing with me simply at their side Or at their kids' sides). This year a Promethean Board, a slate, and the handheld activotes were put in the library, EVEN though I had no wall space for this "contraption." I was a reluctant user, but I tackled the task of finding appropriate uses for these items, and have now been able to demonstrate to other teachers with the same some model uses. I didn't think I would like it, but I do. I make goals for myself that move me out of my comfort zone so that when teachers are ready to try something, I feel better equipped to help. This year's goal is to be more involved in podcasts, now that I have a solid understanding of the Promethean Board and its accessories. We'll see how that goes
Alvin Moses (not verified)

As a science teacher I use

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As a science teacher I use technology from multiple sources. I regurlary have my laptop and projector going, usually with a powerpoint or displaying a video I downloaded from Discovery channel or the likes. I also use a wireless controller, so I can walk about the room when using the powerpoint. For review and evaluation purposes, I use a student response system, where each student is assign ed a number remote control-type deivce and submit their answers using it. Instant grading and feedback. Game formats allow the kids to enjoy reviewing and everyone gets to particpate on every question. In the science lab, I try to intgrate technology like the sensors that attach to the TI calculators, or digital timers and phototgates with equipment. Sometime the technology is colored chalk, or cut out square of construction paper. I don't think technolgy should only apply to things that run on electrcity, and I think that is what it has become. There is also much competition for the computer labs, where I'd like the kids to run program on simulation sites or do webquest from sites like Trackstar. Unfortunately, I think many teachers take their kids there and call it 'research" so they can have their kids on computers for 90 minutes they don't have to teach, and the kids are only doign 5 minutes of "google" and the other 85 of 'goofing". Teahcer should never use technolgy for technologies sake. Find one that fits their current style, and provides a efficiency for them or the students. Photogates are much more accurate than a stop watch. but a stop watch will get the job done.
Carmen Sanchez (not verified)

I have been teaching for 21

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I have been teaching for 21 years, and for the first time teach only math and science to fourth graders. I've had to adjust my methods, but still try to integrate reading and writing. Last year, the District purchased SmartBoards for the libraries and the technology coordinators. I attended the SmartBoard workshop and could hardly wait to try it on my own. I "kidnapped" he SmartBoard from the library and still have it in my room. I love what I have been able to do with it to "jazz"up my teaching. My students are engaged in the lessons and enjoy working on the board. I use it in conjunction with powerpoint presentations; downloaded videos from Videostreaming; and my own creations. I just bought a quickcam to see if I can tape short minilessons. Unfortunally, the District is not buying any more Smartboards this year, so my chances of getting one to keep permanently in my classroom are not very good for now. I teach in a school with more than 93% of the students on free or reduced lunch and for whom English is a second language. Technology is definitely an asset, since most of them do not have a computer at home.
Claudia Ryan (not verified)

Technology is a marvelous

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Technology is a marvelous tool. Though I used it in my classs; I would have used it more if our school had kept up our hardware. Many teachers need to be trained to use the technology. Our school was relatively poor (according to the powers that be.) I would love for all schools to be able to porvide the hardware, the training and the programs that truly help the children learn.
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