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WHAT WORKS IN EDUCATION The George Lucas Educational Foundation

Brain Research and Education

Brain Research and Education

Related Tags: Brain-Based Learning
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207 Replies 2071 Views

I was just reading an article on how it is important for teachers to know the structure and make up of the brain in order for us as teachers to better be able to adjust our teaching in order to benefit our students and help them to learn. It states that teachers should be aware of the two distictive types of memory (Precedural and Declarative). The article advises that teachers become familiar with the brain, its parts and its function. What I would like to hear is whether we teachers should rely solely on the parts of the brain to influence our teaching? Should we look to appeal to different parts to teach specific lessons? Should we now design a course at Teachers Colleges specifically related to the brain and its role in Education? Im looking forward to reading your comments.

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Kimberly Smith's picture

I read the same article and I found the information to very interesting and helpful, but due to the lack of active theory based programs available now it's only something I can apply or take into consideration when designing a lesson. I would like to see neuroscience techniques designed specifically for the use in the classroom so we can see improvements. I agree that there needs to be more exploration into this type of science as it relates to teaching. We can begin to learn so much more about our struggling students from these types of studies.

Kimberly Smith's picture

I read the same article and I found the information to very interesting and helpful, but due to the lack of active theory based programs available now it's only something I can apply or take into consideration when designing a lesson. I would like to see neuroscience techniques designed specifically for the use in the classroom so we can see improvements. I agree that there needs to be more exploration into this type of science as it relates to teaching. We can begin to learn so much more about our struggling students from these types of studies.

Elizabeth M. Fessler's picture

I just went to a seminar, and although it's main purpose was to teach us about comprehension, there was some very valuable information about brain research during the seminar. We discussed Broca's Area, or the temporal and occipito-temporal areas, which are important for the organization, production, and manipulation of language and speech. (Joseph, Nobel, and Eden, 2001. Pretty fascinating things to learn as teachers.

Connie's picture

Brandi,

I worked with a speech pathologist that used Fast ForWord for kids with auditory processing deficiencies and other language impediments. The program is constructed of a series of phonic games that gradually get harder as the kids progress. Although most kids responded well to the computer games, there were a few that wanted nothing to do with it and put up a fight. I don't necessarily blame them because the program requires them to work on it daily with a monitor by their side and a session with the speech pathologist. Please note that it's been about six to seven years since I've worked with the program and am unaware of any changes to the monitoring process or program itself. From what I remember, the students I monitors made significant improvements after the program and working with the therapist. If you have specific questions about the program, I'll try my best to answer them.

Connie's picture

Brandi,

I worked with a speech pathologist that used Fast ForWord for kids with auditory processing deficiencies and other language impediments. The program is constructed of a series of phonic games that gradually get harder as the kids progress. Although most kids responded well to the computer games, there were a few that wanted nothing to do with it and put up a fight. I don't necessarily blame them because the program requires them to work on it daily with a monitor by their side and a session with the speech pathologist. Please note that it's been about six to seven years since I've worked with the program and am unaware of any changes to the monitoring process or program itself. From what I remember, the students I monitors made significant improvements after the program and working with the therapist. If you have specific questions about the program, I'll try my best to answer them.

Olive's picture

There is still much to know about the brain and how it functions. This area of study can be facinating. I read an article on Addressing Literacy Through Neuroscience which showed that there is in place computer based intervention programs that sharpen skills that are critical to reading. A controlled scientific study called neuroplasticity-based training was done which demonstrated improvements in reading and language skills in struggling readers. This is very interesting and could prove to be very helpful for reading teachers.

Deb Selanders's picture
Deb Selanders
Second grade teacher from Globe, Arizona

I read two articles about neuroscience and they both discussed Fast Forward. It is used in my school district. Only three out 11 intensive students participate in Fast Forward. They are pulled out for 30 minutes each day. I have one student who is not making much progress, but the other two seem to be making improvements. I am new to this school. They decide who will go according to their DIBELS scores. It tests the speed at which the student reads, and recall.

I'm a Second Grade teacher. I like the idea of the children doing this before or after school, but I don't think the parents would go for that idea.

Deb Selanders's picture
Deb Selanders
Second grade teacher from Globe, Arizona

I read two articles, one of which was from mcli.dist.maricopa.edu. They both discuss Fast Forward. Sherry, are you in Dr. Brong's class? We have Fast Forward in my school district.

I have 11 students who are intensive at-risk students, but only 3 participate in Fast Forward. This is decided by their DIBELS scores. It tests the speed at which a student reads and their retell abilities. One student is not progressing very well, but the other two are making progress.

I don't know what else I can do for my student. Does anyone have any suggestions?

Shreese Phillips's picture

After reading, "Brain Research and Education: Fad or
Foundation?" by PAT WOLFE, PH.D., MIND MATTERS, INC. I definitely don't believe this is a fad, but brain research for the teacher pertaining to education is very important and neccessary.

michaele cosby's picture
michaele cosby
kin teacher ga

I too have followed brain research in education on a brief level and I feel the research is a great asset to learning how to better serve our students. Any way that we can make it easier or more efficient for the studetns to learn, the faster the progress will occur. In the article, "Brain Research and Education: Fad or Foundation?" by PAT WOLFE, PH.D., MIND MATTERS, INC., they discuss the importance of not just focusing on memory but also on emotions to foster learning. Also, be careful when looking for new techniques. Do the research and make sure the info is valid.

Does anyone have any experience with using Brain Research in classroom that has been a great success?

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