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Brain Research and Education

Ameina

I was just reading an article on how it is important for teachers to know the structure and make up of the brain in order for us as teachers to better be able to adjust our teaching in order to benefit our students and help them to learn. It states that teachers should be aware of the two distictive types of memory (Precedural and Declarative). The article advises that teachers become familiar with the brain, its parts and its function.
What I would like to hear is whether we teachers should rely solely on the parts of the brain to influence our teaching? Should we look to appeal to different parts to teach specific lessons? Should we now design a course at Teachers Colleges specifically related to the brain and its role in Education? Im looking forward to reading your comments.

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Fast ForWord

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Brandi,

I worked with a speech pathologist that used Fast ForWord for kids with auditory processing deficiencies and other language impediments. The program is constructed of a series of phonic games that gradually get harder as the kids progress. Although most kids responded well to the computer games, there were a few that wanted nothing to do with it and put up a fight. I don’t necessarily blame them because the program requires them to work on it daily with a monitor by their side and a session with the speech pathologist. Please note that it’s been about six to seven years since I’ve worked with the program and am unaware of any changes to the monitoring process or program itself. From what I remember, the students I monitors made significant improvements after the program and working with the therapist. If you have specific questions about the program, I’ll try my best to answer them.

Fast ForWord

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Brandi,

I worked with a speech pathologist that used Fast ForWord for kids with auditory processing deficiencies and other language impediments. The program is constructed of a series of phonic games that gradually get harder as the kids progress. Although most kids responded well to the computer games, there were a few that wanted nothing to do with it and put up a fight. I don’t necessarily blame them because the program requires them to work on it daily with a monitor by their side and a session with the speech pathologist. Please note that it’s been about six to seven years since I’ve worked with the program and am unaware of any changes to the monitoring process or program itself. From what I remember, the students I monitors made significant improvements after the program and working with the therapist. If you have specific questions about the program, I’ll try my best to answer them.

There is still much to know

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There is still much to know about the brain and how it functions. This area of study can be facinating. I read an article on Addressing Literacy Through Neuroscience which showed that there is in place computer based intervention programs that sharpen skills that are critical to reading. A controlled scientific study called neuroplasticity-based training was done which demonstrated improvements in reading and language skills in struggling readers. This is very interesting and could prove to be very helpful for reading teachers.

Second grade teacher from Globe, Arizona

Fast Forward

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I read two articles about neuroscience and they both discussed Fast Forward. It is used in my school district. Only three out 11 intensive students participate in Fast Forward. They are pulled out for 30 minutes each day. I have one student who is not making much progress, but the other two seem to be making improvements. I am new to this school. They decide who will go according to their DIBELS scores. It tests the speed at which the student reads, and recall.

I'm a Second Grade teacher. I like the idea of the children doing this before or after school, but I don't think the parents would go for that idea.

Second grade teacher from Globe, Arizona

I read two articles, one of

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I read two articles, one of which was from mcli.dist.maricopa.edu. They both discuss Fast Forward. Sherry, are you in Dr. Brong's class? We have Fast Forward in my school district.

I have 11 students who are intensive at-risk students, but only 3 participate in Fast Forward. This is decided by their DIBELS scores. It tests the speed at which a student reads and their retell abilities. One student is not progressing very well, but the other two are making progress.

I don't know what else I can do for my student. Does anyone have any suggestions?

Fad or Foundation

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After reading, "Brain Research and Education: Fad or
Foundation?" by PAT WOLFE, PH.D., MIND MATTERS, INC. I definitely don't believe this is a fad, but brain research for the teacher pertaining to education is very important and neccessary.

kin teacher ga

Brain Research: Helpful or Hopeful

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I too have followed brain research in education on a brief level and I feel the research is a great asset to learning how to better serve our students. Any way that we can make it easier or more efficient for the studetns to learn, the faster the progress will occur. In the article, "Brain Research and Education: Fad or Foundation?" by PAT WOLFE, PH.D., MIND MATTERS, INC., they discuss the importance of not just focusing on memory but also on emotions to foster learning. Also, be careful when looking for new techniques. Do the research and make sure the info is valid.

Does anyone have any experience with using Brain Research in classroom that has been a great success?

Teacher

Director of Education

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To learn more about learning and the brain and how to use it in your classroom, check out the book "12 Brain/Mind Learning Principles in Action" by Renate Nummela Caine, Geoffrey Caine, Carol McClintic and Karl J. Klimek. This book covers how the brain learns, the essential elements for learning and useful teaching strategies.

On Brain Research and Education

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I am very intrigued by the current developments in neuroscience and how these have impacted the way we teach. I now see the connection between different approaches to pedagogy and the way various best practices affect the way our children learn and retain information. As a result of what I have read, I am convinced that the current paradigm as articulated in NCLB and agressively enforced by school systems across the country only address a small part of what we need to stimulate and enhance learning. Indeed, the demands of procedural retention requires a more project based approach- one that is sustained and not "squeezed in". And since the method prescribed is driven by what is conceived to be "proficient", should we not question the width and the depth and types of knowledge that we are required to present?

Performance Learning Coach/ Bibb County School District

Great questions! I too think

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Great questions! I too think we should have more data to support the stragtegies that we use. If we had a course at our colleges that would share with us the brain anatomy and why what strategy works best for certain information. I think that would be termendously helpful. I do think we need to bring more science back into our "bacholar of sciene" degree. I think most people consider it an art and I can see why; however, there is science to back up why we as professionals do things.

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