Welcome, Walden U students! This is your group.

Brain Research and Education

Ameina

I was just reading an article on how it is important for teachers to know the structure and make up of the brain in order for us as teachers to better be able to adjust our teaching in order to benefit our students and help them to learn. It states that teachers should be aware of the two distictive types of memory (Precedural and Declarative). The article advises that teachers become familiar with the brain, its parts and its function.
What I would like to hear is whether we teachers should rely solely on the parts of the brain to influence our teaching? Should we look to appeal to different parts to teach specific lessons? Should we now design a course at Teachers Colleges specifically related to the brain and its role in Education? Im looking forward to reading your comments.

Comments (211)

Comment RSS

Brain Research

Was this helpful?
0

I have heard several great things about the Fast ForWord program. Our process coordinator mentioned it last year, but we have not purchased it yet for our school. I understand it has been proven to increase student reading levels by at least two grade levels. I would like to know more about this program.

4th grade teacher from MI

Interesting!

Was this helpful?
0

Wow! It was so interesting reading your posts! I am new to this whole blogging thing, but I am getting hooked! I, too, am reading the articles discussed. I have never given much thought to how the structure of the brain plays such a huge role in education. Fascinating!

Brain Based Research

Was this helpful?
0

I think looking at brain research should be a part of a teacher's understanding of students, but should not solely be the basis for educational decisions. I do believe, however, that it is an important part of planning instruction, for you want to appeal to as many different learners as possible with each lesson. Understanding that students learn in different ways helps us to understand that the brain will work differently for each child.

Educating onself about the importance of the brain in learning is a good starting point, but many other factors should also be considered.

Danielle What you said is so

Was this helpful?
0

Danielle
What you said is so true! We need to remember that we are teaching kids not brains. Although, it has been very interesting to read how the brain works. I teach 6th grade math and sometimes, I'm sure my students think I'm teaching a different language. I'm going to use what I've learned to try and differentiate even more than I already do. I went to quantumlearning.com and have asked my administrator to send me to one of the camps. Wish me luck!

I totally agree, if we can

Was this helpful?
0

I totally agree, if we can relate our life experiences to our content area, learning will be much more meaningful and interesting to our students.

I have read articles about

Was this helpful?
0

I have read articles about this in the past. Depending on age level and maturity, the parts of the brain that are not developed yet have behaviors that manifest themselves in particular students.

Angie, I think that's a great

Was this helpful?
0

Angie, I think that's a great idea that you use brain gym in your classroom. I try to do 'Warm-Up' activities to stimulate the brain. Simple things like a brain teaser, a puzzle, a riddle, etc that gets the students thinking. Once they're on a roll, that's when we need to intervene and continue stimulating their minds.

Early Childhood teacher ages 5-6 years from Montego Bay, Jamaica

Was this helpful?
0

I agree with both Andrea and Jennifer. It would be good to go into the classroom equipped with information on how the brain works.
I also read an article that encouraged repitition as a good method of helping the brain to lock in information. I have observed that the more I repeat information or instructions for my K2 the more they remember and follow through on tasks.

I think all teachers should

Was this helpful?
0

I think all teachers should be required to have a course or two on cognitive learning, memory and how the brain works. It is the body organ we as teachers are dealing with on a daily basis, after all! After reading several articles about the brain and how it affects learning, my appetite to learn more increased. I can't wait for more research to come out that will enable me as a teacher to help students reach their potentials more easily.

Was this helpful?
0

I agree with Amanda who said "brain research should be a part of a teacher's understanding of students, but should not solely be the basis for educational decisions." To determine if it is just a fad in education or something that requires more attention from the teaching community will take more time. As a teacher our bag of tricks should be filled with many things and brain research should be one of them.

see more see less