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WHAT WORKS IN EDUCATION The George Lucas Educational Foundation

Buildings teacher-parent relationships

Buildings teacher-parent relationships

Related Tags: Special Education
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6 Replies 328 Views

 

Soon I will be entering the field of teaching Speical Ed. I wonder how I can find enough time in a day to build trusting relationships with the parents and the students. By having a good relationship with the parents, I know that my daily tasks in the classroom should be a little easier. One goal that I have is to make sure that the students receive all the resources that are available to them. Therefore, I must establish a positive relationship with the parents. One way to do this is to learn about the students’ culture. Next, when things are going well with the student, in the classroom, I will let the parents know. This will help reinforce a positive line of commutations. Also this will show the parents that there is a real concern for the well being of the students. Finally, I will invite the parents to the school to discuss any cares or concerns that they may have. By expressing to them that open commutation is the key for their child’s success.  I know that there are so many parts to a good parent-teacher relationship so if anyone would like to share with me more ideas please do thanks.

 

 

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Erika Saunders's picture
Erika Saunders
6th-8th Special Ed, LS & Mentally Gifted teacher

No matter what you do, be sincere. Kids and parents can see through a "duty-lead" approach. Try to get the know the kids, ask them about themselves, and show that you are truly interested. The best way I connect with kids it to show them that I really care about them: not only in school but in their lives as well.

A co-worker once did this homework assignment at the beginning of the year and I thought it was great. Have the parents write about what is great about their child. You can learn so much about the child, the parents, and the home life from this assignment. It can be a real window.

Good luck!

Antoinette McWhorter's picture

As a working single parent of a child in Spec Ed, I find that communicating your goals and expectations for my child is often tied up in the red tape and political correctness of the school system. For instance, if the IEP states a goal is to improve reading comprehension, is the goal achieved if the student does not meet on a nat'l test but receives a passing grade in the class, but is still reading below grade level? The threshold of involvement, in an effort to establish a teacher/parent relationship, could either agitate the teacher/administrators which could negatively impact a student's learning. I'm always torn to communicate or not communicate.

Lindsey Koelling's picture

I am also approaching my first year of teaching special education and parent-teacher relationships will certainly be key. I love the idea of the "homework assignment" for the parents to find out what they think is great about their child. This could provide a great wealth of information and begin making connections from the start!
Also, something that one of my past pre-service teachers suggested to me was trying to make home visits. This, of course, would not always be possible, but she said that it really helped her to build strong, trusting relationships with the parents as well as students who she visited.

Lindsey Koelling's picture

I am also approaching my first year of teaching special education and parent-teacher relationships will certainly be key. I love the idea of the "homework assignment" for the parents to find out what they think is great about their child. This could provide a great wealth of information and begin making connections from the start!
Also, something that one of my past pre-service teachers suggested to me was trying to make home visits. This, of course, would not always be possible, but she said that it really helped her to build strong, trusting relationships with the parents as well as students who she visited.

sushma sharma's picture
sushma sharma
Ninth - welfth grade english teacher Govt girls school Jabalpur India

bridges are used to reach the other end,and so is the teacher parent relationship works.We can do it by arranging a pool lunch or a family day at school.

Tina Olyai's picture
Tina Olyai
Director - Little Angels High School -Gwalior M.P.

Parents certainly need to be associated and taken into confidence to know the child's interests, limits, frustrations, passions, concerns, thinking pattern and above all, his different shades of mood. I personally believe in reaching a child's heart through his emotions and this can only be done when the special needs educators are in regular contact with the parents. Of course, the Parent-teacher meets need to be very well orghanized and the educators must be very honest in their discussions with parents...discussions should always begin with a positive feed back about the child and then move onto the areas in which their child needs improvement or change..!!

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