Facebook
Edutopia on Facebook
Twitter
Edutopia on Twitter
Google+
Edutopia on Google+
Pinterest
Edutopia on Pinterest Follow Me on Pinterest
WHAT WORKS IN EDUCATION The George Lucas Educational Foundation

What are the top 5 barriers for public schools to perform like successful charter schools?

What are the top 5 barriers for public schools to perform like successful charter schools?

Related Tags: Community Bulletin Board
More Related Discussions
36 Replies 1225 Views
I often here that charter schools have a lot of advantages over public schools and "that won't work here". What do you consider the top 5 barriers for public schools to perform like successful charter schools?

Comments (36 Replies)Sign in or register to postSubscribe to comments via RSS

Bonnie Yelverton's picture
Bonnie Yelverton
Still looking for a way to use my credential in secondary math & science

(this comment was posted to the wrong discussion.)

Mary Kate Land's picture
Mary Kate Land
Montessori 4-6th grade teacher
Blogger 2014

Keep always in mind that the purpose of granting charters is to learn whether or not removing the bureaucracy from school leadership can promote student learning.

There is a video online from a charter in New York that pays teachers $100,000 per year. Some find the work impossible, others devote themselves to nothing but their jobs. I have huge misgivings about this approach.

Instead of asking teachers to succeed with the current educational model by compensating them better for being successful at sometnhing that is nearly impossible, we ought to be redesigning the teaching task to make it more acheivable. By asking, "How can we get kids to be more successful in the schools we have?" we are asking the wriong question. We should be asking: "How can we design a school which will best support student success?"

All we would have to do is to base our instructionial methods around practices indicated by neuroscience. These insights about the ways in which learning occurs do not currently inform most of our educational practices. Instead, we continue to pursue avenues which are contra-indicated by the research.

Quit asking teachers to do the impossible.

MK

dbixby001's picture
dbixby001
Citizen who understands Education is the most important piece in society.

Agreed! Let's focus on what that end design should look like and adjust our systems to that. Then, we need to have a process in place to continually monitor how the system is doing and continue to improve it. It should never become static.

[quote]By asking, "How can we get kids to be more successful in the schools we have?" we are asking the wriong question. We should be asking: "How can we design a school which will best support student success?"
MK[/quote]

Peter Smyth's picture
Peter Smyth
Retired teacher and administrator

Great quote:

By asking, "How can we get kids to be more successful in the schools we have?" we are asking the wriong question. We should be asking: "How can we design a school which will best support student success?"
MK
Thanks
And of course that success is not defined as increased test scores, but in becoming learners.

Rebecca Alber's picture
Rebecca Alber
Edutopia Consulting Online Editor
Blogger 2014

Hi Peter,

Your closing comment about our primary objective as teachers: creating learners versus increasing test scores got me thinking. Can't we increase test scores *and* successfully lead students as lifelong learners?

Read blogger Ben Johnson's take on this in his latest Edutopia post, A Different Perspective: Teaching to the Test.

Thanks, and Happy Summer to you all!

Bonnie Yelverton's picture
Bonnie Yelverton
Still looking for a way to use my credential in secondary math & science

I think I've read interesting statistics somewhere (maybe here on Edutopia) that if you teach kids to learn and think, they actually do better on tests.
Certainly a student who understands concepts and enjoys a subject will do better. (Back in my day, my first encouter with multiple choice tests that I recall was taking the SATs - which I did well in. I did drill the types of questions, vocabulary things and all, but mostly I figured things out.
When I took the California Basic Education Skills Test to become a teacher (at a very mature age) I had more trouble with the ELA practice book, because I selected the wrong answer, which was right in my opinion, but I did well on the actual test.
Drill only works if kids are motivated. Period.

Bonnie Yelverton's picture
Bonnie Yelverton
Still looking for a way to use my credential in secondary math & science

I think I've read interesting statistics somewhere (maybe here on Edutopia) that if you teach kids to learn and think, they actually do better on tests.
Certainly a student who understands concepts and enjoys a subject will do better. (Back in my day, my first encouter with multiple choice tests that I recall was taking the SATs - which I did well in. I did drill the types of questions, vocabulary things and all, but mostly I figured things out.
When I took the California Basic Education Skills Test to become a teacher (at a very mature age) I had more trouble with the ELA practice book, because I selected the wrong answer, which was right in my opinion, but I did well on the actual test.
Drill only works if kids are motivated. Period.

Peter Smyth's picture
Peter Smyth
Retired teacher and administrator

Ben - I taught AP Calc and Stats. I have no problem with those kinds of test as measuring real learning. Or even measuring how i taught. And there are others. My issue is with numerous off the shelf multiple choice tests states and districts use the measure "progress". I know a little about test development and a little more about good mathematics. I know that these tests in the earlier grades do not measure the critical, deep thinking a kid needs for AP,nmuch less lifelong learning. These tests are worse than no test at all; among other things, they give a false sense of doing something.

Mary Kate Land's picture
Mary Kate Land
Montessori 4-6th grade teacher
Blogger 2014

My experience supports the assertion that nurturing lifelong learners yields high levels of scholarship (as tested using standardized testing protocols). It also seems to cultivate creativity, leadership, and divergent thinking.

MK

Discussion Visual Learning - The Earth Balloon Portable Classroom

Last comment 20 hours 43 min ago in Community Bulletin Board

Discussion Cash back on buying school supplies

Last comment 18 hours 49 min ago in Community Bulletin Board

Discussion Materiały edukacyjne

Last comment 2 days 5 hours ago in Community Bulletin Board

Discussion STEM: Bringing DNA science and technology to your school

Last comment 2 days 19 hours ago in Community Bulletin Board

Discussion Mind the Gap: Gender and Education

Last comment 3 days 11 hours ago in Global Education

Sign in and Join the Discussion! Not a member? Register to join the discussion.