Project learning can inspire the best of high-performance teamwork, or it can be devolve into unfocused chaos. How can we support each other to keep our eye on the prize? Share your project ideas, questions, and implementation experiences.

What's Wrong with Project Learning?

Carl Bidleman Edutopia TV News Syndicator

I'm not a teacher but, as a teaching/learning method, PBL seems like a no-brainer to me. Since it's not universally accepted and deployed, what are the downsides that I'm missing?

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Long Time Principal

I have been at it for 42

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I have been at it for 42 years and nothing beats PBL. As a Principal I encouraged teachers to have at least one per year. I would help them get started and then let them experience the enthusiasm of the kids.
It's good to be with people who know PBL is the way to teach.
Jerry

Long Time Principal

Nothing!

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Nothing!

Fear of the Unknown

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The problem, at least as many people and most systems see it, is that project learning leads to depth, not necessarily breadth--though you are better prepared to seek out breadth, to appreciate it, to connect it back to what you you know (i.e. depth) going forward. In other words, it doesn't directly lead to better test scores, more "successful" immediate assessment (as assessment is is currently deployed). There's more creativity involved, hence less control, less order, less predictability, more new ideas, approaches, questions, etc., meaning new, fresh, creative, thoughtful responses are needed (as opposed to yesterday's).

Grading/ Evaluation

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One problem is it certainly makes Grading/ Evaluation more difficult. I switched to a Project-Based Learning curriculum this year, and now am struggling mightily to come up with a rubric for evaluation of projects. I could not find anything useful on this site or anywhere else.

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