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WHAT WORKS IN EDUCATION The George Lucas Educational Foundation

PBL Camp: Grades 9-12 (Week 1)

PBL Camp: Grades 9-12 (Week 1)

Related Tags: Project-Based Learning
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How will you make the oil spill relevant to your students? This is our brainstorming thread. Any and all ideas and thoughts welcome!

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Genn Pinnick's picture
Genn Pinnick
BioScience Teacher

[quote]Eric Anderson - Thanks for the link to Boston Globe's The Big Picture website.  Amazing photos 2 mths after the spill. A must see for students and adults............Paul Allison - If possible, please explain more about the 10 Self/10 World questions.[/quote]

Candace, the link you are referring to, from Eric Anderson, sound interesting. Could you please post he link to this. I'm just now gett

Thanks, Genn

Genn Pinnick's picture
Genn Pinnick
BioScience Teacher

[quote]Eric Anderson - Thanks for the link to Boston Globe's The Big Picture website.  Amazing photos 2 mths after the spill. A must see for students and adults............Paul Allison - If possible, please explain more about the 10 Self/10 World questions.[/quote]

Candace, the link you are referring to, from Eric Anderson, sound interesting. Could you please post the link to this. I'm just now getting to participate in this weeks' assignment and I'm trying to catch up.

Thanks, Genn

Genn Pinnick's picture
Genn Pinnick
BioScience Teacher

[quote]Maybe start with having the kids research the importance of the Gulf...have them find out how important the gulf is to us...% of food that comes from the Gulf, # of jobs, amount of money brought in through tourism in the Gulf, etc...Then have them research previous oil spills and how much damage the oil can cause on those important resources they found in the first project. Once they have an understanding of both projects have them tie it together and create a short video that explains the impact of the spill.And then asks for some sort of action for the viewer. (not sure what that could be)...[/quote]

I like you idea. Often students don't know what is important or why. As a Biology teacher I could see adding the study of ecology, ecosystems, biomes, ecological success, secondary succession over a longer period of study devoted to your idea. If students start learning about the importance of both economic issues, and environmental issues concomitantly their questions and ideas may become higher level questions.

I also think it is interesting to add in a part of this project that will showcase examples of environmental recovery and the solutions that have been been employed. It is very easy for young people to give up because it all seems so hopeless. Heck, I feel that way sometimes.

Genn Pinnick's picture
Genn Pinnick
BioScience Teacher

[quote]This summer I am designing the curriculum for a Senior Capstone class for our graduating seniors.  Fortunately, that will allow me to take this in any direction-not just from an ELA perspective.  Eric is right...I think we can catch their attention with the human stories, whether you are in Lousiana or Bangkok, I think kids can relate, perhaps to other kids and the things that affect them. [/quote]

You're right. What a fine idea. How do you suggest incorporating this into a PBL project?

Genn Pinnick's picture
Genn Pinnick
BioScience Teacher

[quote]I am developing a project that asks the students to create a Glog that helps to explain the various aspects of the oil spill to children (particularly 4th-6th grade students).[/quote]

I don't know what a "Glog" is. Is is global blogging or picture blogging?

Jason's picture
Jason
9-12 At-Risk Social Studies Teacher

[quote]I've been thinking about how to invite my students into their own inquiries this fall connected to the BP oil spill in the Gulf. I've also been wondering about how to bring gaming into the curriculum. I'm slowly realizing that these two streams of planning could come together.

Gaming is about empathy, system, making connections, solving problems, and these themes keep coming up as we imagine teaching about the Gulf oil failure this fall. Some of the systems involved are ecological, estuarine, food-chain, weather patterns, economic, engineering... My list is off the top of my head. A lot could be added to it, and that's the point!

I don't know how to build a game that would put the players into different roles, situations, and systems, but isn't it all there to explore?

The thing is, I'm also impatient. I don't think we can wait for this to be developed over the next six months, tested, and then released a year from now.

How could we build a game that is, perhaps, like Evoke or another of Jane McGonigal's games?

Or perhaps, it's about getting students to participate in the research necessary in building such a game? That could happen right away.[/quote]

A webquest could be a way to create a game for the oil spill.
An example of one I found on google is

(http://camillasenior3.homestead.com/webquest.html)

We could use upscale and downscale it for a differentiated learning experience.

Jason's picture
Jason
9-12 At-Risk Social Studies Teacher

[quote][quote]Eric Anderson - Thanks for the link to Boston Globe's The Big Picture website.  Amazing photos 2 mths after the spill. A must see for students and adults............Paul Allison - If possible, please explain more about the 10 Self/10 World questions.[/quote]Candace, the link you are referring to, from Eric Anderson, sound interesting. Could you please post the link to this. I'm just now getting to participate in this weeks' assignment and I'm trying to catch up.

Thanks, Genn[/quote]

http://www.boston.com/bigpicture/2010/06/oil_in_the_gulf_two_months_lat....

Jason's picture
Jason
9-12 At-Risk Social Studies Teacher

[quote][quote]I plan to start the year with the CNN Student news summer video. (http://www.cnn.com/studentnews/)It has a nice segment concerning the oil spill. I will also use the Google Map comparison of the oil spill to my city.(http://paulrademacher.com/oilspill/). I will also do a KWL on the oil spill.   [/quote]Jason, you have some good ideas. Thanks for the links.[/quote]

Genn,

Thank you for reading and responding to my post. I am glad to help. I would also like to commend you on your posting. It is clear that you are motivated and eager to make this group great. I really appreciate your hard work. This camp seems to be an excellent opportunity to make meaningful strides towards effective authentic learning. Thanks again.

Paul Allison's picture
Paul Allison
English, East-West Sch of Int'l Studies & Tech Liaison, NYC Writing Project

Back a couple of weeks, four veteran teachers got together via Skype on Teachers Teaching Teachers and talked about some of the tricky moments we face when we try to bring an inquiry to our students -- such as the Gulf oil spill. I hope this is useful to some: Will our students find the oil spill compelling? 3rd in a series - TTT 206 - 06.23.10

And please plan to join us every Wednesday this summer at edtechtalk.com/live at 9:00pm Eastern / 6:00pm Pacific USA Wednesdays / 01:00 UTC Thursdays.

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