PBL Camp Collaborators Wanted: Grade 9-12 (Week 2) | Edutopia
Facebook
Edutopia on Facebook
Twitter
Edutopia on Twitter
Google+
Edutopia on Google+
Pinterest
Edutopia on Pinterest Follow Me on Pinterest
WHAT WORKS IN EDUCATION The George Lucas Educational Foundation

PBL Camp Collaborators Wanted: Grade 9-12 (Week 2)

PBL Camp Collaborators Wanted: Grade 9-12 (Week 2)

Related Tags: Project-Based Learning
More Related Discussions
39 627 Views
Please share your name and grade level and some info about the project you'd like to do. If you know your driving question, you can include that. If not, it's OK. You can collaborate with your team to develop that.

To connect with someone who has posted a project here, click their name to view their profile. In the left column, under the photo, there is a link SEND A MESSAGE. Use that to securely communicate. From there, you can share your email address or phone number. Please don't post your personal contact info in the group.

Once you've found collaborators, you may click "edit" at the bottom of your post and type PROJECT FOUND in the subject line so the rest of us know you're not available for this collaboration.
Print
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Pinterest
  • Share

Comments (39)Sign in or register to postSubscribe to comments via RSS

Ellen Feig's picture

[quote]I'm in for anything that involves science and literacy. I've started an individual project page on the Wiki but will gladly join you, Ellen, Telannia, and Brett.[/quote]

I would love to do science and literacy - there is some wonderful material written on the environment. Any specific thoughts?

Mike Reilly's picture

I've messaged with some folks about starting a group, and am thrilled to hear they want to play. However, I wanted to post about this odd matching service as a reflection on the process itself:

How do we form groups, and why? What's the point of collaborating with certain individuals versus others? The project itself is our focus, and our initial goal is the "driving question", which serves as scope, motivation, and more. My point: if your group shares a passion for the "driving question", will it do well/better?

With this theory in mind, I put a page on pblcamp.pbworks.com in the "Project" folder, called "YourWater". I sent this to my possible teammates, and I hope they share my passion for this "driving question" and focus. If they don't, c'est la vie and that's okay, but I really like it and can't wait to pursue it.

Students, in turn, are given the "driving question". Their gathering/collaboration is focused on the product to answer the question: make a game, create technology, political initiatives, etc. It's not as important for us, the "driving question" seems critical to me. Good luck to all, and I welcome feedback.

(Next question: how large could a group get? Crowdsourcing? I hope to Skype with my teammates on that one soon.)

PROJECT FOUND

James Spagnoletti's picture

I am interested in exploring the how the spill has resulted in grass roots environmental awareness and protest groups. I am slo interested in exploring the new media used by these groups to interact, plan protests, and share information on how individuals can do something to help the people impactd by the spill. I want my students to also research the history of environmentalism in the U.S.

James

Telannia Norfar's picture
Telannia Norfar
High School Math Teacher

[quote]Dear Telannia: I am also interested in working with you on your project. Both your project and one other very much intrigue me. I was not able to send you a message privately through the method described above. Would you mind sending me a message to let me know whether or not your group has already been formed? Thank you very much. Sincerely, Zahra[/quote]

[quote]To Telannia & Ellen
Could I join you? As I tried to get out on the "tweetchat", I'm @ an inner city high school which features a 30-minute "enrichment" program in thge middle of the day. As part of this, I will need to come up with a PBL project for 15-20 11th & 12th graders that will be working on it twice a week for 16 weeks. Oh, btw, the kids have not really bought into the enrichment idea yet. Most view it as a "break" to be chatted away.[/quote]
I just sent both of you a message to join me tonight for a chat if you have the time. I also sent you a separate email that gives you a link to the location.

If anyone wants to possibly join our group, feel free to send me a message by clicking on my name and then clicking on my name again. Make sure to include your email. The meeting is 9 pm CST July 21st. You can also send me a message even if you don't make the meeting. Other than interdisciplinary we don't have a specific focus yet.

Telannia Norfar's picture
Telannia Norfar
High School Math Teacher

[quote]I've messaged with some folks about starting a group, and am thrilled to hear they want to play. However, I wanted to post about this odd matching service as a reflection on the process itself:

How do we form groups, and why? What's the point of collaborating with certain individuals versus others? The project itself is our focus, and our initial goal is the "driving question", which serves as scope, motivation, and more. My point: if your group shares a passion for the "driving question", will it do well/better?

With this theory in mind, I put a page on pblcamp.pbworks.com in the "Project" folder, called "YourWater". I sent this to my possible teammates, and I hope they share my passion for this "driving question" and focus. If they don't, c'est la vie and that's okay, but I really like it and can't wait to pursue it.

Students, in turn, are given the "driving question". Their gathering/collaboration is focused on the product to answer the question: make a game, create technology, political initiatives, etc. It's not as important for us, the "driving question" seems critical to me. Good luck to all, and I welcome feedback.

(Next question: how large could a group get? Crowdsourcing? I hope to Skype with my teammates on that one soon.)

PROJECT FOUND[/quote]

You bring up so many great points. [I picked a good group to join :)]. Here is my take on some of your statements. I hope others will chime in as well.

How do we form groups, and why? What's the point of collaborating with certain individuals versus others?
I think we form groups first based on people who are like us. In this case, we make seek out people in our same subject area or grade level. We do this because we have things in common. Another is our need. Maybe we join because we can learn from the group or because we need those people's skills.

My point: if your group shares a passion for the "driving question", will it do well/better?
I think having a passion will definitely help the group. I think the driving question is only one aspect so participants don't have to be passionate about it specifically. The main point is the members are passionate overall.

Students, in turn, are given the "driving question". Their gathering/collaboration is focused on the product to answer the question: make a game, create technology, political initiatives, etc. It's not as important for us, the "driving question" seems critical to me.
In PBL, driving question (big ideas), entry event and product are all deeply tied together. I would say all three of these are critical to the instructor. Projects can have you decide the product for the students or students can choose. The biggest thing is that the product makes sense for the driving question. It must be authentic to the role the students will play. For example a question about literacy should not have a product about charts.

How large could a group get?
Huge

Bobbi Combs's picture
Bobbi Combs
High School Language Arts, Cincinnati

I really like your idea. I am working up some ideas on how the food web (formerly the food chain) has been affected, (including the major threat to endangered turtles) as well as how what we eat in the Greater Cincinnati Area will be affected. Perhaps there is a connection to environmental awareness?

Lisa Soper's picture
Lisa Soper
Freshman Biology Teacher, Texas

I am a 9th grade Biology teacher in a very high "at-risk" school in Texas.
I would like to do a project on how environmental change can impact ecosystem stability;including the domino effect it might pose to the gulf coast food web. Any extensions of this idea would be great.

Heather Haberman's picture

You all have some wonderful ideas! The one thing I really want my students to walk away with is the idea that every action we make in our lives has a consequence, good or bad. Here's a rough idea for a project, students will research how we use fossil fuels in our daily lives along with the pros and cons of doing so. We will then take an in depth look at the oil spill and the effects of this disaster, both social and envronmental. Students will then work in groups to create a photostory or video documentry about the spill along with some ideas that will empower the viewers to make a change. Any ideas out there for an action project?

healthteac's picture
healthteac
health/physical education teacher from Newark, NJ

Am looking to connect with a health/science group. I teach health 2 days per week, and phys ed the last 3 days. Need to infuse project based learning, but none of the administrators have a clue how to do it with such restricted time. They just say "You'll figure it out". I teach grades 9-12.

Jennifer Duann's picture
Jennifer Duann
10th grade biology teacher in Lima, OH

I have a project started that frames our discussion of the oil spill as a "trial" where students play the role of plaintiff, defendant, attorneys, witnesses, etc. to help them look at multiple perspectives. The kids will get to decide who they want to try: BP? The American Driver? The government's resource management bureau? Who are the witnesses: Gulf fishermen, native wildlife, the consumer in faraway Lima, OH? Let me know if you're interested in collaborating...I like what you suggested about incorporating media and an action project piece. There are plenty of online petitions going, students could write letters or raise money for different relief funds too.

Sign in to comment. Not a member? Register.