The first years of practice can be a time of great hope and exhilaration -- and fatigue and anxiety. This group is designed to allow new teachers and veterans alike to connect and share that sense of community that is so important in the first years.

Does Creative Teaching Hurt College Readiness?

Lauren Vargas A New Teacher

This may seem like an absurd question, but it has been bothering me recently so I will pose it nonetheless.

I work at a private college prep school outside of Houston that is similar to Kip and Yes Prep. So our students come from inner-city Houston and are all on scholarships.

I am very interested in non-tradition (non-lecture) teaching methods and encouraging discovery and student centered instruction. At the same time, I can't help but remember what college was like (for me, less than a year ago).

By playing to how students learn and become interested and engaged, are we teaching them to be college ready students. What will they really face in college.

They will have to read large sections of text per week, with one or two lectures where the professor will most likely cover a small (often insignificant) section of the subject material covered in the reading, and students will be expected to be tested through exams or essays on the material regardless of whether the professor directly addressed it or not.

If students are not actively exposed to lecture style teaching, especially in the 11th and 12 grade years, how can we say they are ready for college style teaching. They may be ready intellectually but perhaps we have not prepared them to have the student skills required to deal with this style of teaching.

I want my students to learn and become interested in the subject. I want them to be prepared to write essays and think critically. However, my students can't take notes - they don't know how - from a lecture.

As k-12 educators adapt and work to teach based on how students learn, but the college level continues to (for the most part) teach along traditional lines, are college prep schools making college ready students?

How can we be innovating and engaging but also prepare students for teachers and professors who are not?

Comments (25)

Comment RSS

Much resonance Sarah. There

Was this helpful?
+1

Much resonance Sarah. There is NO reason creative classrooms should miss the lecture, note-taking and listening and deep reading modes. Moffett (English prof from Phillips Andover/Exeter) wrote "where deep intellectual inquiry abounds, morality may ensue." I show my kids "Emperor's Club" first thing each year and that stimulates desire to be serious scholars - from kids who never got anything better than a C, and hated school/writing and reading (texts). Memorable moment - "Hey Mr. I, that makes me want to be a real STUDENT...got any of that Shakespeare stuff?" I almost wept - burst out laughing in joy instead.
We have turned note taking, recapitulation, summarizing and condensing (and re-hydrating into story telling from notes) an ART. They (and their parents, when there ARE any) are thrilled. Most never learned the art of notes. Lectures? I LOVE 'em ,,,when I'M motivated and interested. When I'm NOT? It's like bad dental work. or worse. Human children we love deserve better.

social studies teacher from MN

I do agree that colleges are

Was this helpful?
0

I do agree that colleges are still using the traditional method of teaching. Elementary, middle school, and high school teachers are exploring with non traditional teaching, but is it the best for the students? If students are exposed to non traditional teaching, ultimately, it may hurt a students chance for success in college.

social studies teacher from MN

I do agree that colleges are

Was this helpful?
+1

I do agree that colleges are still using the traditional method of teaching. Elementary, middle school, and high school teachers are exploring with non traditional teaching, but is it the best for the students? If students are exposed to non traditional teaching, ultimately, it may hurt a students chance for success in college.

Gifted Education Specialist

Balance

Was this helpful?
0

I think there is a need for balance. When my daughter was enrolled at UW, I recall one of her classes has students engage in project-based learning. I was glancing at it once during a visit and noticed a glaring error. Since none of them had expertise in the field and the project allowed them to "learn from one another," no one was able to correct a huge, foundational misunderstanding, never mind smaller errors. Students need correct information from texts and instructors - not just experiential learning. There is a place for more creative demonstration of learning, but it fails to impart expertise.

Critical Reading

Was this helpful?
0

Using and teaching Critical Reading is a great way to engage students and teach them the skills they need to read and understand a text.

see more see less