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WHAT WORKS IN EDUCATION The George Lucas Educational Foundation

Education Nation: Discussion of the six leading edges of innovation in ed.

Education Nation: Discussion of the six leading edges of innovation in ed.

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Dr Milton Chen (Edutopia senior fellow and exec director emeritus) and Anthony Armstrong (middle school teacher and member of the foundations national advisory council) will be presenting a webinar on August 26 on the topic of the six leading edges of innovation that were covered in Milton's book Education Nation.

This webinar will offer a bird's-eye view of the leading edges of change in education, plus practical tips for how to bring some of these innovations to your classroom.

Milton and Anthony will be available after the webinar to discuss these innovations here in this thread. Hope you can join us!

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Milton Chen's picture
Milton Chen
Senior Fellow

Donna, one group of PBL schools, charters, are the Envision Schools in the Bay Area founded by Bob Lenz, an Edutopia blogger. Their college-going rates are impressive as one measure of their success.

Milton Chen's picture
Milton Chen
Senior Fellow

Cathy, this is a really important step that teachers can take, to help educate parents about their role as co-educators, beginning with how they talk to their kids (and already have been talking for five years before they arrive at kindergarten). The Hart and Risley study I cite in the book is amazing in showing how, by the age of 3, children in some homes had been praised about 500,000 times, while others only 75,000 times.

Milton Chen's picture
Milton Chen
Senior Fellow

Cathy, this is a really important step that teachers can take, to help educate parents about their role as co-educators, beginning with how they talk to their kids (and already have been talking for five years before they arrive at kindergarten). The Hart and Risley study I cite in the book is amazing in showing how, by the age of 3, children in some homes had been praised about 500,000 times, while others only 75,000 times.

Milton Chen's picture
Milton Chen
Senior Fellow

To Trudy's comment, it is true that many of the ideas in my book connect with ideas that have been discussed and implemented in some places, going back to Dewey more than a century ago and even Edutopia's past 20 years. But innovation needs to be measured in practice, not in discussion and theory and we have a long way to go before these "edges" move to the center of our educational system.

Here's a story you can share: A new 3rd-grade teacher develops a new technique for teaching reading that works and she's excited to tell her education professor. When she returns to campus and tells him, he puffs on his pipe and gazes off in the distance and says, "Well, now, that might work well in practice. But would it work well in theory?"

Stephanie Dolansky-Mahathey's picture

@Milton, exactly. How parents speak to their children matters, or that they speak to them at all. The effect of tone matters. The effect of kids growing up in single parent homes where they grow up unacknowledged by the absent parent makes a huge difference. Perhaps a dialogue needs to begin to target and make those parents more aware of their impact and responsibility as co-educators.

[quote]Cathy, this is a really important step that teachers can take, to help educate parents about their role as co-educators, beginning with how they talk to their kids (and already have been talking for five years before they arrive at kindergarten). The Hart and Risley study I cite in the book is amazing in showing how, by the age of 3, children in some homes had been praised about 500,000 times, while others only 75,000 times.[/quote]

Anthony Armstrong's picture
Anthony Armstrong
8th grade U.S. History, 7th grade World History

[quote]I would really be interested in hearing from Anthony about how he sets up assessments and his grade book or some great resources for assessment with this new way of learning and teaching.[/quote]

Three of my favorite sources for creating the assessments I use in class can be found below:

Dan McDowell's Participation Rubric: http://nobilis.nobles.edu/tcl/doku.php?id=courses:history:us_history:us_...

Angela Cunningham's Discussion Guide: http://blogs.bullittschools.org/iclassroom/2010/01/23/class-discussion-g...

ABC-CLIO's Evaluation Criteria and Scoring Rubrics: http://www.abc-clio.com/historyuncovered/evaluation.aspx

With the class now more student-centered and project oriented, I now have the luxury of time in my class to really observe my students as learners. In PowerSchool, I enter ongoing narrative comments about observations I make of the students as they proceed through the learning process. Both students and parents have commented to me on how much more they like and prefer this kind of feedback. This is due to the fact that it journals their growth as learners throughout the activity instead of just at the end.

Denise Foures-Aalbu's picture
Denise Foures-Aalbu
French/English Instructor

We are all teaching and learning along with the children in our lives as well as absorbing new information. This is an incredible moment in the history of education and we need to think about how we are passing on our knowledge to help future generations of children to compete in a global marketplace. We are all in this together and need to help parents during this time of innovation since we are collectively in charge. Perhaps helping parents learn collaboration skills could help them understand their role as co-educators and make them feel more involved (as well as important)?

Allen Berg's picture
Allen Berg
curriculum and projects learning centers

Greetings colleagues,

I listened in on Dr. Chen's webinar last week and was inspired to make my first youtube video: I am a semi-retired teacher and techno-newbie, but always active arts & craftsman...

"Magic Mirror Box 2" is an update I made today based on 'discovering' Windows Live Movie Maker on my new laptop; this allowed me to add a "Credits" conclusion to last week's Picasa version. I hope you view the wordless instructional video about the "Magic Mirror Box" and can make use of it as a fun discovery learning tool for your classroom.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CNBdy101jfk

Caretaker of Wonder,

Allen Berg

kasha8888@yahoo.com
aka: phineas8888

Angel Bestwick's picture

I participated in the webinar and I am about half way through the book. I am finding it difficult to get through the book in a timely fashion because I keep stopping to check the links and article references as I am reading. I am curious as to why this innovative book is not available as an ebook. It would make it easier to check the links and so forth that are connected to each section of the book.

Just curious...

Anthony Armstrong's picture
Anthony Armstrong
8th grade U.S. History, 7th grade World History

[quote]Greetings colleagues,

I listened in on Dr. Chen's webinar last week and was inspired to make my first youtube video: I am a semi-retired teacher and techno-newbie, but always active arts & craftsman...

"Magic Mirror Box 2" is an update I made today based on 'discovering' Windows Live Movie Maker on my new laptop; this allowed me to add a "Credits" conclusion to last week's Picasa version. I hope you view the wordless instructional video about the "Magic Mirror Box" and can make use of it as a fun discovery learning tool for your classroom.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CNBdy101jfkCaretaker of Wonder,

Allen Berg

kasha8888@yahoo.comaka: phineas8888[/quote]

Your video is evidence to your willingness to continue to be a life-long learner. Well done Allen!

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