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WHAT WORKS IN EDUCATION The George Lucas Educational Foundation

What's The Best Classroom Management Advice You've Gotten?

What's The Best Classroom Management Advice You've Gotten?

Related Tags: Classroom Management
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141 Replies 21985 Views
I thought it might be useful/interesting if people shared the best piece of classroom management advice they've gotten/read/heard... Mine comes from Marvin Marshall, who is my favorite (by far) writer/thinker on positive classroom management. He’s written a question that we as teachers might want to consider asking ourselves regularly. He wrote: Will what I am about to do or say bring me closer or will it push me away farther from the person with whom I am communicating? Of course, we’re just human and all of this is far “easier said than done.” But it’s not a bad level to aspire towards…

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Jewell Frogel's picture

What helped me the most my first few years was reading Dr. Harry Wong's book
titled the First Days of School. I learned much reading this book and it has many suggestions for making your classroom run smoothly.

LindaC's picture

Harry Wong prepares you for the first few weeks of school. Dr Fred Jones prepares you for the next 20 years. If you learned from Harry , please prepare even more and read Fred Jones- Tools For Teaching.
Teachers of every grade level and subject area rave about Fred.

Lucy's picture
Lucy
Elementary Teacher

"Treat each student the way you would want to be treated"... and you'll have the best classroom environment ever! A positive approach is always the best way and eliminates any negativity. We all need motivation and positive self esteem in our lives- children thrive on this and work best when immersed in this environment :)

Miss Brenda's picture
Miss Brenda
Program Director at a Boys and Girls Club

You have already won. You are in charge, and therefore there is no need to argue or become upset or show that you have power by winning the fight between yourself and the kids. You have already won. They can either chose to side with you, the winner, or chose to lose.

http://corduroysbutton.wordpress.com

Clémence Rincé's picture
Clémence Rincé
French teacher (IGCSE, IBDP)

To catch student attention, motivate them, keep them focused and interested, the best practice is transparency!
What are we learning today? Why are we learning that? What will we be able to do at the end of the lesson? How it will help you to improve? As a language teacher, it's important to keep a track on the progress because language is a skill-based subject! It requires a lot of practice which is sometimes a bit demotivating...
Clemence Rince-Bonsergent

MrsTeacherLady's picture

The best piece of classroom management advice that I ever got was from my Student Teacher Supervisor. She said "It's better to fight one battle rather than to fight 180 battles." She was a master of classroom management because she set out her expectations from day 1, and would let you know if there was a problem. Instead of letting a management problem escalate, she addressed it when it happened.

Dr. Tracey Garrett's picture
Dr. Tracey Garrett
Professor of Teacher Education

I think the best piece of advice I can offer is that teachers need to understand what classroom management really is. Classroom management is a process of key tasks that teachers must attend to in order to develop an environment conducive to learning. It is imperative to understand these key tasks and then develop a plan which incorporates practical strategies to address each key task.

Melanie Link Taylor's picture
Melanie Link Taylor
Educational Consultant/Author, Southern California

Best advice as a new teacher was from a principal: call the home.

Andrew Motz's picture
Andrew Motz
first year middle school social studies teacher

one of the simplest classroom management hints I got in my limited time was to not make promises that I couldn't keep. This is definately true, because if you can't follow through with, the students will continue to push the boundaries. This works in both positive and negative roles. If you can't give a student the incentive promised, they will not respect your offers.

Mindy Keller- Kyriakides's picture
Mindy Keller- Kyriakides
High school english teacher and blogger.

Best advice I received the week before I started teaching at a Title I high school: "Love them."

In retrospect, after ten years of teaching adolescents, I see that this one piece of advice has taken me further in classroom management than any other because that love evolved into mutual respect, which in turn, evolved into a functional, positive learning experience for our class.

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