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WHAT WORKS IN EDUCATION The George Lucas Educational Foundation

What's The Best Classroom Management Advice You've Gotten?

What's The Best Classroom Management Advice You've Gotten?

Related Tags: Classroom Management
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I thought it might be useful/interesting if people shared the best piece of classroom management advice they've gotten/read/heard... Mine comes from Marvin Marshall, who is my favorite (by far) writer/thinker on positive classroom management. He’s written a question that we as teachers might want to consider asking ourselves regularly. He wrote: Will what I am about to do or say bring me closer or will it push me away farther from the person with whom I am communicating? Of course, we’re just human and all of this is far “easier said than done.” But it’s not a bad level to aspire towards…

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Karen's picture
Karen
Sixth grade English teacher in Boulder, CO

was that the number one reason for losing control of a classroom is not being well-planned or prepared. When the academic content isn't enough to motivate me to keep prepping, that is.

reem's picture

[quote]My sponsor teacher once told me this during my practicum, "If you have an engaging lesson, students are less likely to misbehave." It's so true - there were times when my lessons were more like listening to me talk, and there were times when my lessons were full-blown hands-on. There were much less issues with student behaviour/classroom management issues when the students were so engaged![/quote][quote]My sponsor teacher once told me this during my practicum, "If you have an engaging lesson, students are less likely to misbehave." It's so true - there were times when my lessons were more like listening to me talk, and there were times when my lessons were full-blown hands-on. There were much less issues with student behaviour/classroom management issues when the students were so engaged![/quote]

Jessica's picture
Jessica
Building Confidence in Students, One Child at a Time

The best way for the classroom management is to be friendly with the students and make them comfortable. Communication is really very important to make them feel free with you. Engage them through discussions and asking them several questions as this will boost up their confidence and interest level. Apart from these, make sure that they must follow the rules and regulations as well as this will maintain the decorum of the institution. http://www.1to1tutor.org/free-session/

Holly Willis's picture
Holly Willis
Former Social Media Marketing Assistant at Edutopia

This is such an important topic. With so many great answers so far, we thought we'd get our Facebook Fans involved as well. We asked Larry's question on our Facebook page, and received close to 200 responses. Visit the post here.

amy's picture
amy
6th grade teacher from ILM, NC

As I try to guide and mentor interns, I find behavior management is the stumbling block which makes the ride most difficult for many of our future teachers. This is definitely a discussion post I will recommend to my current and future student teachers as they try to find their niche in classroom management. It is certainly not a one size fits all solution and what works for me may not work exactly for them. Personally, time on task is my strategy- keep them so engaged, there is no time for off task behavior. I enjoyed reading everyone's advice.

Theresa Smith's picture
Theresa Smith
Student teaching this year and finishing up my undergrad in MD!

As I am student teaching the thing about classroom management that is preached to us and have a set stern system from day 1 and nothing less!

Claire's picture

I am currently in a 3rd/4th grade combo class. The biggest classroom management problem in my classroom is that there are two different grades, which poses the issue of different maturity and understanding levels. I have found that the most important way to handle this problem is making it clear that we are a community of learners. Everyone is unique and special, but we are all working towards the goal of being successful. Sometimes my students need that reminder that distracting their neighbor hinders the successful community, and they may want to rethink their actions....

Claire's picture

I am currently in a 3rd/4th grade combo class. The biggest classroom management problem in my classroom is that there are two different grades, which poses the issue of different maturity and understanding levels. I have found that the most important way to handle this problem is making it clear that we are a community of learners. Everyone is unique and special, but we are all working towards the goal of being successful. Sometimes my students need that reminder that distracting their neighbor hinders the successful community, and they may want to rethink their actions....

The Discipline Doctor's picture
The Discipline Doctor
Math teacher, teacher advocate, discipline coach

The best advice I ever got was to have as many rules as you want and make rules for minor misbehaviors. When students see you won't accept the little things, they often won't even consider the bigger ones. #TheDisciplineDR

Bob Sullo's picture
Bob Sullo
author, educational consultant

I had a hard time trying to figure out if this comment was serious or not. I have waited a few days before commenting because I wanted to see if it was followed by an "only kidding" post. The best advice you ever got was, "Make as many rules as you want"? Really? I guess that would make sense if you wanted only a few. If a teacher wanted lots of rules, it would seem to be a recipe for classroom disruption, especially if you are working with adolescents. In m y classroom, I'd want to have as few rules as possible and have kids focus on learning, nit "the rules." Create a long list of rules with older kids and their focus will be on trying to figure out how to circumvent what they will perceive as an oppressive system where they have little or no control. I find this post disturbing because it advances the dynamic that we are in competition with kids and need to show them who is the boss. Then again, I believe that we are inherently driven to learn, gain skill, and be competent. I reject the "Lord of the Flies" world view that would fill our classrooms with "as many rules as you want" to keep the little savages from running wild.

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