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A new form of Music Notation that teaches math and music!

Numbered Notes New form of music notation that teaches kids math.

Numbered Notes music notation is a new design on an old idea. Did you know that the music notation that we use today is over 300 years old and was NOT designed for 12 notes? Originally it was designed for only 7 notes and 5 additional notes were added in the Medieval ages. These are the black notes on the Piano. The notation is so hard for kids to learn and read because instead of assigning each of the 12 notes a unique letter name monks just kept the original 7 notes A-G in place and referred to the new notes by their proximity above or below by using sharps or flats. That is why the note above C and below D is referred to as both a C# and a Db. Two names for the same note!
Numbered Notes solves this naming problem by assigning each note a number 1-12. Numbers also allow for counting so you can navigate intervals in a logical way. The “12 note staff” assigns notes to consistent positions eliminating the challenge of remembering the Treble and Bass Clefs. Also a new timing system uses the same conventions for Notes and Rests so once you learn one you know the other. The new notation is designed for the task at hand. It was designed by professional musicians and artists so that it would be intuitive and functional.
I our opinion, a huge problem with education is not just class sizes and funding but the ACTUAL CONTENT! Numbered Notes is like a software upgrade for an older version. It can do Bach, Mozart and Chopin too. It's time we started redesigning the information systems that we are teaching our kids and let them really succeed! Try Numbered Notes for yourself on our website keyboard and let us know what you think …..good or bad. www.numberednotes.com

Our goal is to bring music literacy above 90% using Numbered Notes. See for yourself!

Comments (18)

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New form of music notation that teaches kids math.

Interesting!

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comment test.

It sounds messy from a

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It sounds messy from a concert band point of view. I have the privilege of teaching all of my beginning band students in a large group setting with mixed instrumentation. My students typically have no difficulty understanding notation by the time they've spent a semester studying the instrument. I would be interested in seeing how it deals with notes smaller than a quarter note and how it deals with dotted notes.

Piano students already have

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Piano students already have several numbers to negotiate—i.e, fingering, counting the beats, time signature. The basic intervals on the piano are a great visual aid for learning 2nd, 3rd, etc. Sometimes difficulties with reading notation (especially two staffs of music at once) can actually be due to vision problems. When students understand basic theory, it's a lot easier to read music. They see chords instead of individual notes. They see (and hear) scales, modes, etc. They see patterns, and aren't even thinking about letter names at times. It becomes more intuitive and automatic, like reading a language.

Music Teacher from Olympia, Washington

My question would be, how

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My question would be, how will this help a student to be a versatile musician no matter where they go in the world? If they learn to read music this way, will they be able to work in all different kinds of settings, in many countries, with all different kinds of musicians at any level? The music theory that we use may be old and have it's flaws, but it is used worldwide and therefore no matter what musician or performing group you play with you will be able to create, because you speak the same music language. If a student was to learn this way, would they be able to take say a Rachmaninoff piece and read it and perform it? Or would they have to do a ton of transposing of notation? If they did, then they would have to be able to read the "old" notation as well to understand how to transpose the information.
I know that music theory is difficult to learn, but if you have a teacher who is willing to use differentiated instruction to teach it from all angles then students have a much better grasp. The reasons students have a difficult time learning to read musical notation is not because of the theory itself, but because of the way our teachers are teaching. It is not the content it is the instruction.

New form of music notation that teaches kids math.

Kids can READ and PLAY music in 15 minutes!

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Numbered Notes could revolutionize music notation....here's how.

We have recently done a half hour session with kids ages 5-11 and 11-13. The teen agers were able to play immediately by just matching the numbers from the page to the numbered keyboard. They literally walked up to the numbered keyboard and numbered sheet music and began playing on their own!

Using familiar number symbols allows them to "READ" the notes because they are able to identify and index the number symbol. Regarding content, we are also able to digitally convert songs from MusicXML and PDF so in time we will be able to convert any song written in current music notation.

Another great thing about Numbered Notes is that it is ideal for teaching kids math concepts and do so directly by using numbers. Our timing system is uniquely different than current music notation and it is easier to learn because the symbols logically match the math concept they represent. For example, in NN we have 4 Counts Per Measure. That means 4 "single" counts per measure. Single notes can be "fractionalized" into Halved, Quartered, Eithed, etc. Longer notes can be "multiplied" x2, x3,x4.x5 etc. Thus providing all of the timing functions used in current music notation while displaying the information in a more literal logical way. We have converted a Chopin piece as an example of a more complex piece.

As educators it is important for us to champion and introduce ideas that will continue to move the field of music notation further. I know that it is a big idea to consider but the results are proving to be amazing! Kids can read and play music almost immediately. From there we have the benefit of teaching them about: Timing, Scales, Chords, etc...

We are doing another camp soon where kids at an after school activity will be learning and playing Numbered Notes for 1 hour a day for 4 or 5 days. It is remarkable but in the very first 15 minutes they will be able to READ and PLAY the numbers on the page. We have already tested it out no people of all ages and the results are virtually 100%. People who can read numbers and play the corresponding numbered key on the keyboard.

The numbers also act as a valuable index system for navigating intervals. For example and Perfect 5th is+7 above or -5 below the Root note. So if I start on note 1 (middle C) and add +7 I get 8. (1+7 = 8) This makes it easy to navigate around the keys using basic adding or subtracting. Intervals in Numbered Notes are always referred to by their half step interval. So a Major Scale is R+2457911. This also makes it easier to understand the interval anatomy of Chords. A Cmajor would 158 CEG. The intervals are Root +47. This is a much better way to both label the notes and intervals. In this way they can be used together in conjunction with each other for a purpose. Letters with sharps and flats are not as easy to navigate through. Numbers are ideal for indexing sequences and at the end of the day we are trying to label each note with a specific name, in a specific position relative to other notes in a logical way.

I understand these are big claims but please visit our webpage and give it a try for yourself. Try it with some of your kids and see what they think. www.numberednotes.com

Thank you for your comments, critiques and user stories. Please let me know what you think of the points I made above and what your experiences are with playing Numbered Notes.

All the best,
Jason

Music teacher in Texas

It seems to me like this adds

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It seems to me like this adds an extra step. I looked at the Chopin piece on the website. For example, I see 8's with 3's next to them... so does that mean I play 8 and a 3rd above it? So Instead of just playing the pattern of dots, I actually have to look closely at that number to see what it says.

I can see this being a fun app to play with, but not adequate for serious musicians. Either way, you have a to learn a system of notation, so why not learn the one that most music is already in?

I bet these same kids would learn traditional music notation in the same amount of time...

Band teacher from Bowling Green, Ohio

I see this as an interesting

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I see this as an interesting idea, but one that might have come a few hundred years too late. Too much history, and way too much music to overcome.

Musician, music teacher

No, no, no! You have

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No, no, no! You have reinvented the wheel, but badly! Music notation works just fine as it has developed. Did anyone catch how students were able to play "... by just matching the numbers from the page to the numbered keyboard"? This is like those old organs they used to sell with colored keys and music with colored notes. SURE they can play --- when they have the colors, and IF they already know how the rhythm of the tune goes.
I don't understand why the author(s) of this idea seem to think that reading music notation is so difficult. Perhaps there are some people who just can't understand it, but it seems to me that the need is for a way to help those people understand how what exists works, not to develop a new system that just messes things up.
I feel sorry for the kids going to the camps they put on.

co-founder I am Bullyproof Music

Although this sounds a wee

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Although this sounds a wee complicated at the get-go, it also sounds like it might be a lot of fun to hand to kids to play around a bit. Maybe ask students what THEY think as a critical thinking assignment.

Oh... that's right. Classroom music teachers don't mix critical thinking with music. Maybe it's time?

Musician, music teacher

Sure we teach critical

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Sure we teach critical thinking, and we are also critical thinkers. That's why I can say this numbered notes thing is useless. We already have a system that works. If these folks think it's too difficult to learn, I have to question whether we can accept anything they say as being intellectually valid. The only use for their idea, as I perceive it, might be to use in some sort of programming application. But numbering all the notes and then playing numbers.... I guess if a person is just too mentally challenged to learn what, for instance, a C is, and which C and where it is on the keyboard (or trombone or flute or tin whistle) then ok, do the numbers. Boy, I'll bet Mozart would have liked that! Oh, wait, he was a genius; that must be why he could read notation!

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