Does one-to-one computing enhance the learning process?

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Bonnie Bracey Sutton (not verified)

Susan Adler's comments ring

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Susan Adler's comments ring true for me, but there is a level below the access. Many teachers have not learned to integrate technology into learning. If the use of technology fails, it is because we do not give proper time, attention and expertise in subject matter to the teachers who are learning to use computers at any level. One to one computing, i wish I had been so lucky. Five computers worked for me, but I can imagine the possibilities. I would love to be given such a task, that is to teach using one to one computing.
Joan Ray (not verified)

Jim Moulton phrased my

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Jim Moulton phrased my sentiments. Joan Ray
Susan Adler (not verified)

One-on-one computing could

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One-on-one computing could enhance the learning process if classrooms weren't so crowded, teachers could assist students and not spend time troubleshooting tech problems (tech assistance has been all but eliminated because of lack of funding). Project based learning with technology is so much more effective when you have 20 or fewer students in your classroom. You can keep students on task and monitor their work. Right now I'm thinking give the money to reducing class size rather then spend it on technology.
matt butcher (not verified)

I would love every student

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I would love every student to have a laptop. However, I think that setting up focused lessons on the computer is a lot of work. How do you implement this rather than say, "Here's a computer."
Jim Moulton (not verified)

Hmmm... I just have to

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Hmmm... I just have to comment on this piece of the original post, Sara: "Proponents of these types of initiatives contend that having one computer per student at school not only decreases the persistent digital divide but also allows for improved curricula and student engagement. Some suggest, however, that technology alone doesn't do the trick." You see, I sit on both sides of this "fence." Yes, the kids need to have access to 1:1 because such is the way the world works in 2006, and no, technology alone will never "do the trick" when it comes to teaching and learning. I think any advocate for 1:1 access should say, as my other postings echo, that the best can happen when access to the tools of today is coupled with involvement in rich school environments that feature project-based learning experiences that engage kids with comunity and vice-versa. Along these lines, I am pleased to see Antonio's statement above: "...I am hopeful and optimistic that we are both ready as a school community, but more importantly, prepared to support the new forms of teaching and learning." I have to feel confident that given the preparation they have put into the groundwork, they probably are ready for squeezing the best out of 1:1. Good luck, Antonio, and please, let us know how it goes.
Antonio (not verified)

We are taking steps towards

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We are taking steps towards a possible implementation of a 1 to 1 program at my school in 2007. However, a great deal of time and resources has been devoted to providing our faculty with a laptop of their own and ample time to become comfortable with using the technology on a daily basis. Our faculty laptop program began three years ago and in the years since we first started the implementation process, we have seen significant increases in faculty technology proficiencies and comfort levels. Anxiety levels have gone down and our teachers are now reluctant to turn their computers in before the end of the school year for updates and maintenance. Schools attempting to pilot or implement a 1 to 1 should allow time for their faculty, in many ways the most important component of such a program, to fully develop as technology users. The final decision to move to a 1 to 1 will be made during the course of this school year, yet I am hopeful and optimistic that we are both ready as a school community, but more importantly, prepared to support the new forms of teaching and learning. web.mac.com/antonioviva
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