Does entering kindergarten late improve a child's academic performance?

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Angela (not verified)

Kindergarten

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I agree with this person here. Age should not be a factor, for a child to enter kindergarden. Children should enter kindergarden, when they are ready, and the age should not matter. I believe children should not be pressured into learning the basic school stuff, until their mind is ready to. Not all children perform at the same level, and this should be taken into consideration.

Although, I was held back, and started kindergarden at the age of 6, and my peers where a yr younger than me, I excelled in school, beyond 100%. Also, I was much more mature about being responsible, when it came to school. In fact, I didnt make friends with my peers in school, but became close friends with the teachers, instead! lol.

Age should not be a requirement, to enter kindergarden. The kindergarden entry requirement, should be based on a child's mental ability and maturity level, when they are ready to learn the kindergarden basic requirements, to start kindergarden.

Young children (ages 4 and up), who are stuggling with learning the kindergarden basics, can encourage the child to learn more, by allowing parents, to enroll their children into free preschool programs, provided by the govt public school systems, to have them be ready, for kindergarden. The public school system should encourage children to go at the pace (ablilty level), rather than pressure them, according to their age, when entering kindergarden, or any other grade. The truth is, every child learns at different paces, and this MUST be taken into consideration, because I believe a child will do better, and if you let them learn things, at their pace (w a positive, but patient approach, to encourage better and faster results)...rather than the other way around.

Anonymousa (not verified)

Cutoff date for entering kindergarten

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All three of my children have summer birthdays. One in August, one in July and one in September. The first two started school on time (meaning they were 5 not 6 in kindergarten). I plan to start the third one as well in the year he turns 5.

My middle child was academically ahead and bored by kindergarten even though he was the youngest. He was already reading. I cannot imagine what his behavior would have been like (he tends to be mildly disruptive, class clown, when bored) if we had held him. Now, at 6, he is excelling in 1st grade and following the behavior rules.

My daughter who had the August birthday struggled a bit with phonics in kindergarten, but now as a 5th grader reads on a high school level.

Thank God that even if they change the Tennessee cut-off date, my youngest will still be able to start on time at his private school just across the line in Virginia.

Doing School Our Way (not verified)

Age matters . . . not

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As an advocate of individualized instruction and merit-based promotion, I believe that age is too arbitrary a standard to apply to a young child's education. Parents know when their children are ready for a kindergarten curriculum. If your 3-year-old child reads at a first-grade level, it's time to take the plunge. This probably should be done by someone with intimate knowledge of the child's strengths, weaknesses, and tolerance levels (perhaps a parent).

Censor me (not verified)

So you're saying that a

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So you're saying that a child that has a birthday of Aug 31st vs Sept 2nd is a level playing field. I think not. My son will turn 5 in late July, five weeks before the cut off time. But, a child that is five Sept 1st, but turns six on Sept 2nd is fair against my child. No, I don't think so. The child with the Sept 2nd birthday is almost a year older than my child yet they would be in the same class. What about the fairness to the other kids that are so much younger that those children with late fall birthdays, Sept, Oct etc..? It's not about making it easier on my child, it about stacking the cards in as much as his favor to succeed.

Anonymous (not verified)

I am one of those people who

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I am one of those people who believe that when we hold children back because we want them to have an easier time in school this adversely effects the actual five year old kindergarten child. I don't know why everyone thinks that their child should be superior - of course your child will test better and read better at six years old. But this thinking is detrimental and unfair for all the five year old children who are in kindergarten where they should be! Our standards have changed because parents want their children to have an easier time in school. The normal five year old child in a kindergarten classroom with all six year old children makes it harder for them. This is sadly unfair. Six year olds need to be in first grade! Life isn't easy and if parents continue to pave the easy road for their children I am assuming these kids will have major issues by the time they need to stand on their own two feet. If the school cut off for kindergarten is September first - then the August 31st birthdays should be required to attend kindergarten that year they turn FIVE. I believe the older child does more harm than good in a kindergarten classroom. - a six year old child needs to be in first grade. I think we all believe we faired pretty well in school and guess what most of us were SIX years in first grade and we couldn't read. Think about it!

Anonymous (not verified)

In defense of affluent families

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Do a Google search on PreK studies, and virtually all results will link to how badly the lower-fifth of children are doing and how the other 80% should pay for it. Bravo to Anonymous above.

To be sure, access to resources is helpful, but parental expectations, a loving home environment, and two involved parents is worth more than gold to children. Ayn Rand was right: stop taxing the rich to pay for stupid mistakes of the poor. And Jim Fay was right: parents should suffer the natural consequences of their actions, rather than bailing them out with tax dollars.

Anonymous (not verified)

There are lots of ways to

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There are lots of ways to educate your child that do NOT cost money. The groups you are referring to that may enter behind do so at their own choice! Their children are behind (probably over 99% of the time) due to a lifetime of poor decisions and choices. The bit of information kindergartners must know is miniscule. The mere thought some children are not taught this little bit along the way before hitting age five is sickening to me and only a symptom of a larger problem with ever expanding populations in lower socio-economic groups. Good common sense just isn't common anymore. Trite but true!

This whole attitude of affluent parents having so much more choice and thus cranking out children of superior intelligence is a total crock. There are other reasons children from affluent backgrounds do well you know. It begins with decades of hardwork and dedication of both parents and making good solid choices so they can provide a life for theirselves and their possilble offspring. It then moves forward with a PLANNED CONCEPTION--preceded by a woman choosing a well appointed father possessing indicators of good father material, a birth plan, prenatal vitamins, proper nutrition and prenatal care and a mother's lifestyle indicative of healthy baby. It moves forward carefully with well thought out decisions on baby's care, toddler care, etc. Having a successful school experience has little to do with money. What happens to children from lower socio-economic status if they are bussing to better school districts? Statistics tell us there are little or NO marked improvements. Why? Because nothing in their home environment changes. Parents will get out of a school what they put into it. You are playing the fiddle for parents that don't care (as witnessed by parental involvement stats in challenged school districts) and want people like you to do the work for them while lowering expectations for everyone. KEEP LOWERING EXPECTATIONS AND OUR CHILDREN WILL NOT BE ABLE TO COMPETE in a global society!

Julie (not verified)

I am a parent of a five year

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I am a parent of a five year old boy (turned 5 in August)who entered kindergarten this year. After a month and a half of school, his teacher suggested a preschool/kindergarten atmosphere may be better for him. She spoke of the possibility that he was developmentally delayed and showed work to support her opinion. Also she mentioned that when at play, my son tended to stay away from the other children which completely surprised me because he was always an outgoing child. Her conclusion was that his behavior would probably continue and the frustration could possibly have affect on his socializing skills and his ability to learn in the future. After much research and many conversations with different educators, I have to agree. I must admit that although it shouldn't, finance does play a role in the decision of a childs future. My husband and I were fortunate enough to take out a loan to pay for an extra year of private school for my son but it definately is going to be a struggle. In New Mexico there is no pre-k assessment. There are no programs within the public school system to accomadate these children which is truly disturbing. What happens to the children who's parents can't afford it?

Anonymous (not verified)

I believe that every child

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I believe that every child is different. My oldest son started kindergarten when he was five, his birthday is in July, and he struggled throughout his education. My youngest child could not start until her sixth year because her birthday is October 14, but she was more than ready. I tried everything I could to get her in school, her brother is a sixteen months older than her and she learned everything he did as he went through school, and was more than ready. School has not been challenging enough to keep her interest. I push her at home and keep her challenged because I am a teacher, but I feel she would have done better if the school allowed her to begin when she was ready.
As far as social development, she is a year ahead of her peers in school. Her friends are all in the high school and she feels her classmates are immature.
I don't believe that a child should be held back for any reason other than he or she needs academic help.

Anonymous (not verified)

A different question...

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Perhaps rather than asking if holding a child back improves their academic performance we should be asking if the purpose is to improve a student's athletics performance--which is why, in the district I formerly taught, I regularly taught students who were 18 at the beginning of their senior year. Bigger kids = bigger/better athletes = college recruitment.

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