Do you feel comfortable being absent from your classroom?

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Scott (not verified)

I just don't like to be gone

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I just don't like to be gone out of the classroom. As a C/T teacher the students can not work on the equipment if I am not there which leaves them with either reading or watching a video.
Chris (not verified)

For my class, the students

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For my class, the students are working on continuous projects, the students have a "job." Each has a title and a list of responsibilities, the class goes on with or without me. I am never more than a phone call away. The class is really like a business...the students work to a common goal. Once they are trained, they use me for expertise or advice as a business would use a consultant. Our sub system is effective and most of the subs are decent...occassionally we have one that does not work out for our particular school and we have a process in place where we can ensure that they do not come back to our school.
Becky Leff (not verified)

We have good subs at my

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We have good subs at my school (an independent school), but I find it hard to leave plans for a sub to do what I would do. If I don't know the sub, I don't know how carefully she will read and follow the plan. And, since we use textbooks and worksheets very sparingly, it is sometimes difficult to write out what I would like to have happen in a lesson.
Lori Oglesbee (not verified)

I have procedures and

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I have procedures and expectations in place so that when I am absent, my high school students continue with their individualized instruction. My favorite comment my principal ever made on my evaluation was "I can't even tell when you're absent." *I teach high school journalism, Web design and advise the yearbook staff. I travel at times during the school year to teach and attend workshops.
MK (not verified)

1. I live in an affluent

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1. I live in an affluent area with excellent schools but our schools pay substitute teachers exactly the same daily wage as illegal migrant manual laborers receive, with no benefits and no job security. It is no wonder they have trouble holding onto highly qualified substitutes. 2. In forty years of secondary teaching I haven't seen an administrator cover a class if a sub isn't available. They divide the kids up and dump them into other teachers' classes or send them to the library for a study hall. Most the administrators stay as far away from real students as possible. Perhaps it is different at the primary level. 3. Given the two situations above of course I feel uncomfortable when I must be absent from my classroom.
Bonnie Bracey Sutton (not verified)

Being absent from the

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Being absent from the classroom. A thorny topic . I am no longer in the classroom probably because I had to be absent to participate in national initiatives in technology and education. There were alternative fundings offered to give me a half time teacher, to assist me who would work with me on a daily basis but the school system was not happy with that deal. So I was moved from the classroom to another area, the career school, and I worked an afterschool and Saturday program for a number of years. I always thought that co teaching was possible and in fact did it during the team teaching period , ( when it was allowed). Then if a teacher was out, the team filled in and there was no major reshuffling. When I worked in ghetto schools, we teachers absorbed the children from the teacher's class who was absent. No substitute would come to our school. It was not their school of choice. When working in another difficult school, though I was the technology specialist, if the Kindergarten teacher was absent it was my duty to teach her class. I had not a lot of training for K but, with new technologies on the days that I taught, I created some new ways of teaching and learning with the help of reading resources that I had. I also found a lot of software that the teacher was not using and we used it to get their attention and to enable them to use the computer lab. Footnote When I left the classroom ( the travel was then too much to coteach with) I had 2 years of sick leave.. but I was only compensated for less than half of that. I am not sure what the lesson is in that. I suppose I was lucky because I never was ill. The value of being in the classroom and the chore of writing lesson plans for others made me very careful about not being OUT of the classroom. But now I have rethought that. There should be I think school substitutes for particular schools who are available on professional leave days, and sick days. Just my ten cents worth. Bonnie Bracey Sutton
Doug Immel (not verified)

If proper plans are left,

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If proper plans are left, then the sub might be able to jump in. It is slightly more challenging (depending on the sub) when one is involved in project-based learning and not working from things which are fairly canned or text-driven. If the group is indoctrinated in proper, respectful and responsible classroom behavior, they are more inclined to work well when the sub is injected into the mix. As an administrator of a tiny, PBL school, if teachers left good plans, I could usually work the sub role well. But, a stranger might flourish or flounder. In rural areas, and tough urban areas, subbing is a challenge on both ends.
Rick Speigner (not verified)

First, I really enjoy

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First, I really enjoy teaching and do not want to be out at all. (I have missed 1 Friday in 9 years when my dad had surgery.) Second, I know that the students will not learn much with a substitute. We have no say on who the sub is. Some are good, some are terrible. We don't even have a form to fill out that says how effective the sub was. Third, it is a huge amount of trouble to plan for a sub so that some learning takes place. (if the plan happens to be followed)
Mona (not verified)

I have taken only a half day

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I have taken only a half day for personal use in 5 years. I do have to be out for meetings every six weeks and have tried a sub once, 5 years ago. It was a disaster. I teach gifted and talented and therefore nothing is "normal" for a sub. My principal has told me to get a sub only if I can find one that is not just going to babysit. Otherwise, I will cancel classes. Needless to say I have come to school in pretty bad shape many a time because it was still easier on my nerves than finding a competent sub. I am, oddly enough, planning on a sub for tomorrow. I think I have found someone that I can trust with my students, my lessons, and my room/equipment. If she is successful I may be able to finally breathe easier and not have to just cancel classes in order to attend training and meetings in the future. But it really is a pain to get it all ready, spell it all out, and I am still hoping she can read my mind from a long distance if she needs help. Wish us both luck.
chuck laiti (not verified)

I teach Computer Graphics

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I teach Computer Graphics and there just aren't subs with the proper background to do any real instruction. If meetings or an occasional sick day call me away there is a gap in learning. I maintain a class website and over the years continue to enhance resources available there. I now make videos of my lectures and post them so that kids that are absent and miss a project introduction they can view the material on their own. Still I avoid being absent from the classroom.
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