Do you favor year-round schools?

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Scott Bowler (not verified)

I would support a modified

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I would support a modified year-round school calendar, much like the British one. Far too many kids lose far too much in the way of skills and habits, so a system where we were in session for 6 to 8 weeks, followed by a break of a week, then 10 weeks on and two off, and a final 4 to 6 weeks off in a block in the summer would be most effective for all. We'd still have good continuity and we'd still have a good long break in the summer. Plus, we'd get to travel at times when others are not and it would provide more opportunities for "after school" service providors to do some creative scheduleing and expand their programs.
Scott (not verified)

I have been in education for

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I have been in education for 15 years and have preached year-round schooling (YRSg) for the past 10. The reason I am in favor of YRSg is student retention. I hate the beginning of each year when you must reteach the material they students are suppose to know simply because they forgot it or because they haven't used in for over 2 months. Parents gripe and complaint about test scores, student achievement, etc ... but when suggestions are made that could improve it (which I believe YRSg could) they begin screaming that it will mess up their schedules. Well I hate to tell them that they can't have it both ways. Which is more important? Their child's education or their schedule. On the personal side I think going 9 weeks and then being off for a week would also help to improve student (and teacher) burn out. So selfishly I am in favor of YRSg!
Sandy - South Carolina (not verified)

I have worked in both types

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I have worked in both types of schools and would choose Year Round every time. The schedule that we had worked well and even took into consideration those families that did not have child care available. We attended 9 weeks, which was followed by: * 1 week of 1/2 day "remediation" for those students who needed more individual attention/instruction to catch up [classroom teachers worked w/ these students] * Remediation students had the opportunity to stay for the afternoon [child care] and join the Enrichment Camp for opportunities that were planned by those teachers who wanted to earn "extra money" (like teaching summer school) * Professional Development was held in the afternoons to meet the District's quota * The following 2 weeks were for a teacher/student break, or students could continue to attend and participate in the Enrichment Camp. This was at an inner city magnet school and the students made great gains because they got that extra help when they needed it (instead of waiting until the end of the school year) and everyone [students AND teachers] were rested and ready to begin the next cycle. We also had 6 weeks off during the summer (4 weeks + 2 weeks after the 4th quarter when there was no Enrichment Camp) This would have been about the normal time that kids would have been home anyway. Earlier someone stated the problem of parents having children on different tracks. We were to have a Middle School and a High School come on board with the same schedule, which did not happen. This did cause a problem for some, but most of the parents liked having their elementary age children in this program.
Elliott Greenblott (not verified)

Year-round school should not

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Year-round school should not be viewed as 260 days of instruction. It can take a variety of foms that provide short, planned vacations, action projects and authentic assessment, community service, continual learning. Wouldnt it be progressive if we could eliminate the annual teacher refrain about how much kids have lost or how much I have to reteach due to loss during the summer?
Joshua Abrams (not verified)

Reasons that I vote to

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Reasons that I vote to continue summer vacations: 1) Most teachers work long and hard hours during the school year and need some kind of break from what is an emotionally demanding job. 2) There are other fields that could make the same claim and do not get the break, but it is also an essential time for professional development and curriculum planning. From the student's perspective: 1) Until we get away from schools primarily as a testocracy, summers serve several important social and academic roles. Play and group work are much more a part of most summer activities. For kids who get to go to camp and experience nature, this is a crucial activity and one horribly neglected by most schools. We are raising a generation that is alienated from nature and therefore less engaged in the sciences since nature experiences are a prime inspiration for children. 2) With increased testing, schools are throwing away PE. The summer provides an opportunity to move their bodies. If we are going to spend money on the increased staffing required for year round school, I vote to spend it instead on regular year staffing for smaller class sizes to provide more personalized learning.
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