Comments (36)

Comment RSS
Erin M. (not verified)

This is my first year to

Was this helpful?
0
This is my first year to teach keyboarding. I know this is an important skill and so many parents are thankful that my school offers this 9 week course to 6th graders. But what do you do for the students who don't catch on as fast as the others. I don't want my students to be bored while we are waiting on a few studedents to finish a lesson. Can you also give me some ideas to maybe make it more exciting?
Char Gould (not verified)

Your article will be

Was this helpful?
0
Your article will be reprinted and posted by many technology instructors. Community members in the technology industry are not aware of best teaching practices and often suggest curriculum pacing that will be detrimental to underlying skill development. Keyboarding is a gateway skill. We are handicapping students by not providing instruction and guidance. I have an observation - and to be honest a belief - concerning keyboard speed. It is linked very closely to the ability to spell. If a child has very poor spelling - they are not able to type words or thoughts, but only individual symbols. Now my question, do we have any research examining possible improvement in spelling and therefore reading levels - as a result of keyboarding practice? I'd be interested in knowing. Thanks for the encouraging article.
Wes (not verified)

I agree, kids need to be

Was this helpful?
+1
I agree, kids need to be taught at an early age how to use the computer because these days technology is taking over the classroom. Also, on the other hand though, being an elementary school these days is more like being in middle school. Children are learning how to speak spanish starting in 1st grade. I remember the my days in elementary school when we learned the basics that prepared me for middle school, but its not like that anymore and I believe that it takes away from the children learning to be social. Elementary school is not only a place of learning academics but also social skills. Many friendships are formed in elementary and the social part of their life starts to become bigger. To just keep adding more and more academics to elementary takes away from that. So in ways i'm split, it would help for them to learn the computer skills such as basic typing, but when are we going to stop adding more and more requirements for children at such a young age. I didn't learn how to type until i was in 7th grade and I now am a computer whiz.
Kathryn Peyton (not verified)

I am a grade 7-8

Was this helpful?
+1
I am a grade 7-8 keyboarding/technology teacher. I agree with most of the above. Keyboarding is a great endeavour for middle school students for many reasons. One, they learn a valuable skill that is very manageable at their level and they gain the confidence of doing something well. Two, they get to use their hands to do something at least once a day. Three, they are usually already typing, but incorrectly, so learning to keyboard properly requires them to get outside their comfort zone and take a risk. It is also a good class for kids who don't necessarily excel in the academic classes, but can be quite adept at keyboarding. One concern I have is the standard requiring spreadsheets by eighth grade. In my experience, the whole spreadsheet concept is a little too abstract for the middle school brain. Some kids get it, but most are not able to get beyond simple data entry. The notions of formulas, copying formulas, etc. just doesn't make sense to them at this level. I think time in a tech class for middle schoolers is far better spent on presentation software, multimedia, and basic internet skills (both researching and staying safe).
Marilyn Chiarello (not verified)

Keyboarding is a skill that

Was this helpful?
0
Keyboarding is a skill that I teach in our elementary school computer lab to 3rd and 4th graders. It is the only skill that I teach in isolation. All other computer skills are integrated into projects that support the curriculum. Beginning in first grade, students use the computers for curriculum-embedded projects developed collaboratively with the classroom teacher.
see more see less