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WHAT WORKS IN EDUCATION The George Lucas Educational Foundation

K-12 Education Tips & Strategies That Work

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You'll find practical classroom strategies and tips from real educators, as well as lesson ideas, personal stories, and innovative approaches to improving your teaching practice. If you have any thoughts or comments about these blogs, please don't hesitate to let us know.

Student teamwork is integral to developing 21st-century skills, but group assessments can also serve as individual assessments by building checkpoints into collaborative activities.
In part six of his year-long series, Kevin Jarrett reflects on his middle school makerspace's successes and growth opportunities, with an eye on the upcoming capstone projects.
One teacher used a unique social deduction game to build a unit on the Salem Witch Trials that also taught students empathy and systems thinking.  
Halfway through the school year, pause to reflect, review your accomplishments, make an action plan going forward, and determine how you'll hold yourself accountable for these goals.
From interactive timelines and rich multimedia to lesson plans and study guides, find a variety of web resources that can help bring black history into the classroom.
Brett Vogelsinger January 15, 2016
In an age of texts and tweets, teach your students the value of slowing down to write something that touches a heart or motivates an action.
PD could be more effective if we differentiated it by gauging teachers' readiness, utilizing their interests, involving them in the process, and providing continual assessment opportunities.
Emily Lee & Nanor Balabanian January 14, 2016
Two teachers' research and ELA unit explored students' own family immigrant stories while creating a storytelling experience as a vehicle for empathy, community, and great writing.
By making classrooms places where real-world work and thinking happen, we encourage inquiry, conversation, and conflict in hopes of creating something better for our students.

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