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WHAT WORKS IN EDUCATION The George Lucas Educational Foundation

K-12 Education Tips & Strategies That Work

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You'll find practical classroom strategies and tips from real educators, as well as lesson ideas, personal stories, and innovative approaches to improving your teaching practice. If you have any thoughts or comments about these blogs, please don't hesitate to let us know.

Heather Wolpert-Gawron February 24, 2015
Blogger and English teacher Heather Wolpert-Gawron asked her eighth grade students what they find most engaging in the classroom.
Fifth grade teachers use their PBL pilot program to teach the leadership and collaboration skills that future employers are likely to expect of their students.
By gamifying their school's PD, two educators motivated and engaged their faculty to master the challenges of learning how to teach in a 1:1 environment.
Marilyn Price-Mitchell PhD February 17, 2015
Stimulate your students' curiosity by encouraging valuable questions and tinkering, looking for teachable moments, and building lessons around current events and critical thinking.
As the app world encourages students to turn inward, schools can serve the critical role of reconnecting them to the world where they actually live.
Bring professional development events to life with Interactive Learning Challenges, which merge collaboration, interactivity, and problem solving in a hands-on environment for learning technology.
Most teachers differentiate their instruction intuitively because not all students are the same. For those willing to commit to DI, the next step is intentional differentiation.
Personalize your PD by using tools like Google Forms, Padlet, and Nearpod to learn what teachers already know and what they need to know.
Engineer PD activities on your own terms, whether it's inside your own school building, among far-flung teacher friends, or out in the teacher-friendly Twitterverse.
For successful gamification, build the excitement, use the data you collect, make the game fun for all students, and never underestimate the value of play.

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