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You'll find practical classroom strategies and tips from real educators, as well as lesson ideas, personal stories, and innovative approaches to improving your teaching practice. If you have any thoughts or comments about these blogs, please don't hesitate to let us know.

Eric BrunsellNovember 10, 2010

I have written a few posts here about science inquiry and providing students with authentic science experience. This week, I thought I would showcase a few other bloggers that are writing about science inquiry.

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Suzie BossNovember 8, 2010

When the Deepwater Horizon oil well exploded in the Gulf of Mexico earlier this year, teachers across the country recognized an opportunity to bring real-world applications of math and science into their classrooms. Similarly, the rescue of 33 Chilean miners has triggered student discussions about everything from heroism to human biology.

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Kathy BaronNovember 5, 2010

I'm beginning to agree with traditionalists who argue that education should go back to the old days -- if we could be assured of landing at Midland, an elementary school in Rye, New York, between 1956 and 1966. More specifically, alighting in the classroom of teacher Albert Cullum. He had an intuitive sense of what worked in education, regularly incorporating teaching methods from project learning to social emotional learning, long before they had academic labels.

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Heather Wolpert-GawronNovember 5, 2010

I don't know what our civilization will be remembered for, but one of the concepts I would like to nominate as most valuable is our recent era's ability to democratize information.

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Milton ChenNovember 3, 2010

One of my favorite books in high school was John Steinbeck's Travels With Charley, his account of his road trip around the U. S., late in his career, accompanied only by his French poodle Charley. Not having traveled much as a boy beyond my home state of Illinois, into Wisconsin and Indiana, I was mesmerized by his stories of the vastness and diversity of our country.

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Ken EllisNovember 3, 2010

There is something about a dogpile that makes people smile. It touches a chord deep within anyone who has accomplished something extraordinary after long, hard effort. You may have seen a major league dogpile -- a gathering of 25 or so men who spontaneously turn into boys and pile on top of one another to celebrate an extraordinary triumph at the end of a season that runs as long as a school year. Learning should be fun and exciting. So why not replace the funereal pomp and circumstance march with high fives and maybe a dog pile or two?

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Rebecca AlberNovember 2, 2010

You mention to a fellow teacher during lunch or after a faculty meeting how far along you are in the curriculum and they respond, "Oh, I'm way past that." Gulp. Not what you were looking to hear, right?

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Bob LenzOctober 29, 2010

Whether you are a fan or a cynic, the film, "Waiting for Superman" has shone a welcome spotlight on the long time crisis in our public education system. What I believe is really at stake when considering that crisis is whether or not we give a generation of kids the opportunity to move out of poverty.

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Mary Beth HertzOctober 28, 2010

This is the third post of a four-part series about planning and running an edcamp unconference. You can read the first post, Introduction to edcamp and Taking Care of the "Big Stuff" first if you missed them.

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Gaetan PappalardoOctober 27, 2010

I want you to reach up and feel the bumps on your head. Let your fingers run along the hills and crevices of your dome; examine the terrain. End your exploration by palming your entire head like a basketball. Now I want you to unzip your skull. I can hear the slow clicking of each metal tooth. And inside your head you won't find a brain, but an eyeball: a large, gooey eyeball pivoting on an elastic tendon. Searching. Looking. Staring. It's your mind's eye. And it depends on you, my writing friend, as to how much that eyeball can see.

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