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WHAT WORKS IN EDUCATION The George Lucas Educational Foundation

K-12 Education Tips & Strategies That Work

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You'll find practical classroom strategies and tips from real educators, as well as lesson ideas, personal stories, and innovative approaches to improving your teaching practice. If you have any thoughts or comments about these blogs, please don't hesitate to let us know.

Guest blogger Shani Leader, an art teacher at High Tech High, describes how her students' fascination with graffiti opened the way to a multidisciplinary project incorporating fine arts, social science, language arts and technology.
Guest blogger Heidi A. Olinger, STEAM teacher and social entrepreneur, gives an insightful strategy for learning about what students value and then teaching in ways that will engage them by appealing to those values.
Rebecca Alber January 15, 2014
Formative assessments matter because teachers make important instructional decisions based on the data they provide.
Professor Rebecca Alber shares three ways to gather and use valuable student data to inform your instruction.
Literacy instruction is the responsibility of all educators -- regardless of the content they teach.
Guest blogger Alicia Iannucci, a math teacher at Quest to Learn, explains Caterpillar, a game she developed to teach her sixth graders about probability and statistics, as well as the fun real-world skill of game modding.
Guest blogger David Cutler suggests that classic superheroes and the medium of comic books can engage students as well as (or better than) more traditional texts in teaching plotting, character development and U.S. history.
Edutopia blogger Mark Phillips takes an unflinching look at five counterproductive and emotionally harmful illusions that reflect what far too many teachers expect of themselves and their students, suggesting that our best really is good enough.
Edutopia blogger Rick Curwin walks us through the strategy of harnessing students' natural human tendency toward wonder and prediction as a powerful means of classroom engagement.

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