K-12 Education Tips & Strategies That Work | Edutopia
Edutopia on Facebook
Edutopia on Twitter
Edutopia on Google+
Edutopia on Pinterest Follow Me on Pinterest
WHAT WORKS IN EDUCATION The George Lucas Educational Foundation

K-12 Education Tips & Strategies That Work

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Pinterest
  • Share

Recent Blog Posts


You'll find practical classroom strategies and tips from real educators, as well as lesson ideas, personal stories, and innovative approaches to improving your teaching practice. If you have any thoughts or comments about these blogs, please don't hesitate to let us know.

Check out these questions to guide you in reflecting on how much the learning environment you have designed promotes student voice and choice.
Asking a question can be a scary step into the void. How do you create a culture of using questioning in the classroom?
Consider using at least one of these protocols -- QFT, Chalk Talk, Say Something, or the Harkness Discussion -- to foster student inquiry.
Through podcasts, web pages, mailed invitations, a "Meat 'n' Greet," and a final email blast, you can build up your incoming students' back-to-school excitement.
Have you ever wondered how the world around you works? Physics can tell you! Check out these ten YouTube creators who are making videos all about the physical world.
Marilyn Price-Mitchell PhD August 14, 2015
Even in a highly-structured classroom environment, you can foster creativity with strategies like possibility thinking, divergent thinking, encouraging student interests, and collaborative learning.
Heather Wolpert-Gawron August 13, 2015
In project-based learning, students show what they learn as they journey through the unit, interact with its lessons, collaborate with each other, and assess themselves and each other.
Matt Davis August 13, 2015
Blogger Matt Davis writes about some of the best resources for novice teachers. There's useful advice on classroom management, lesson planning and building relationships with parents from a variety of sources.
Staying organized is about finding a system that works for you, picking tools that you'll actually use, and continually refining what works best for you.
Teachers can inspire out-of-box thinking for students by using problem-based learning, art, music, and inquiry-based feedback.