Blogs on Technology Integration

Blogs on Technology IntegrationRSS
Jim MoultonJune 19, 2007

I am just back from a conference in Mitchell, South Dakota, where I was sharing some of what we have learned in Maine as well as things learned from working with other one-to-one laptop efforts across the country. Because South Dakota is, like Maine, largely rural, the 350 or so educators attending the conference were receptive to my message.

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Chris O'NealJune 11, 2007

Have you checked out Ning, a new social-networking Web 2.0 site? Ning, primarily geared toward adults, is more a place to create social networks rather than a social network in itself.

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Chris O'NealJune 7, 2007

This is a follow-up post to "1-2-3 -- Red Light!: Let's Give the Use of Technology in Classrooms the Green Light Instead." There's still a lot of talk about the digital divide in this country. I've seen it firsthand as I've worked with schools and school districts around the country on technology-leadership issues; some student populations do lots of online and computer work at home, but other schools serve students who don't have computers and Internet access at home, so the choices for after-school technology work are limited.

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Diane Demee-BenoitMay 25, 2007

The TechBridge program is alive and well at the Chabot Space & Science Center, in Oakland, California. Selected in 2005 by the National Science Foundation as a model program, TechBridge is an out-of-school program that engages girls in science, technology, and engineering activities. Since its inception, TechBridge has served more than 1,500 girls in five school districts through after-school and summer programs.

The TechBridge program is alive and well at the Chabot Space & Science Center, in Oakland, California. Selected in 2005 by the National Science Foundation as a model program, TechBridge is an out-of-school program that engages girls in science, technology, and engineering activities. Since its inception, TechBridge has served more than 1,500 girls in five school districts through after-school and summer programs.

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Ken MessersmithMay 21, 2007

The report "A New Day for Learning," recently released by the Time, Learning, and Afterschool Task Force, argues that we must redefine the school day if we are to improve student achievement in the United States. The authors of the report, funded by the Charles Stewart Mott Foundation, lay out five elements of their proposed new learning system.

The first element states that we must "redefine what student success means beyond the acquisition of basic skills, support the time it takes to experience success, and develop sophisticated ways to measure it."

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This three-pronged statement, centered on student success, begins with a call for a new definition for the phrase "student success." Philosophers have debated for centuries about what it is to be an educated person. I am not convinced we can agree on what it is to be successfully educated, but we must individually have some vision in mind if we are to be able to determine whether we have hit the mark.

Most Americans, I believe, would define student success as the ability of a student to support himself or herself in this society after completing the educational process. Our value and belief systems are strongly based on economics and accumulation of material wealth. How often do you hear parents say, "I don't want my children to have to come home to live with me after completing their education"?

It's difficult to argue with the fact that the ability to support oneself economically is a goal of the educational process, but it is not the only goal. If it were, we would not need schools; we could easily achieve success by matching students with professional mentors and letting them learn on the job.

What additional definitions could we use for student success? I would like to suggest a few, and I am interested in what you would add. Student success, I believe, means the ability to

  • understand the rights and responsibilities that allow us to function as contributing members of our democracy.
  • cooperate and collaborate with others in work, social, and family settings.
  • make independent decisions based on reasoning supported by facts gathered and analyzed by students.
  • relate in a positive and constructive manner with family members and other members of the world community.
  • take responsibility for one's own actions and act supportively and compassionately toward others.

Maybe, though, it would be easier to list things that should not be included in our definition of student success. It is not a sign of student success to

  • score highly on an arbitrarily chosen standardized test.
  • help beat a rival football, basketball, or wrestling team into submission.
  • have every student specialize in science, technology, engineering, or math in order to beat the Chinese in the economic realm.
  • efficiently perform repetitive tasks in a factory setting.

How do you define student success? The form of our future educational system is dependent on how we answer this question. Please offer your suggestions.

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Chris O'NealMay 11, 2007

A while back, I posted a blog entry titled "Online Interactivity for Educators: A Teacher's Tour of YouTube." Many people replied with comments, questions, suggestions, and so on.

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Ken MessersmithApril 25, 2007

Many people believe that a high-quality teacher-education program must include field experience for teacher candidates in all education courses. Organizations such as the National Network for Educational Renewal and the Association of Teacher Educators strongly support this concept.

Many people believe that a high-quality teacher-education program must include field experience for teacher candidates in all education courses. Organizations such as the National Network for Educational Renewal and the Association of Teacher Educators strongly support this concept. Read More

Jim MoultonApril 24, 2007

A few weeks ago, I spent the day in residency in a small school doing purposeful podcasting with seventh-grade teachers and kids. We were using a model I call professional development for kids, where we cut out the middleman (or -woman) and deliver the tools right to the kids and teachers at the same time.

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Chris O'NealApril 24, 2007

Several of us have chatted here before about wikis. As an educational-technology person who spends lots of time online, I can tell you it really does take a lot to win me over as far as new technology and its worthiness in education are concerned. Wikis, however, have done just that.

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Dr. Katie KlingerApril 19, 2007

As educators, we naturally view the world in the context of creating positive opportunities for teaching and learning. Yet many times, when this happens, our ideas also have an effect on how communities pass values and expectations along to their children.

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