Blogs on Professional Development

Blogs on Professional DevelopmentRSS
Samer RabadiNovember 7, 2013

As we work toward redesigning Edutopia to be more community friendly, we also want to make sure we spotlight the awesome community contributions that already live on the site. One way to do that is through a blog series documenting the community's favorite discussions and posts. This is the first post in that series.

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Jennifer KrzystowczykOctober 23, 2013

Wondering what will happen if your school brings iPads into the classroom? Is your district discussing the purchase of iPads as opposed to laptops? Here at Bellevue Public Schools in Bellevue, Nebraska, we have dipped our toes into the iPad arena and have discovered some amazing and inevitable elements from our experiences!

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Rafranz DavisOctober 22, 2013

Edutopia is celebrating Connected Educator Month in October. And when I saw the discussion about what it means to be a connected educator, started by Community Manager Samer Rabadi in the Community Bulletin Board group, I felt inspired to tell my own story.

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Don Doehla, MA, NBCTOctober 14, 2013

A couple of weeks ago, Samer Rabadi, Edutopia's Community Manager, started this discussion on the Community Bulletin Board: "What Does It Mean to Be a Connected Educator?" He observed that, for many of us, becoming connected educators has transformed our lives. I would certainly agree with that!

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Harriet SanfordOctober 11, 2013

Change is becoming a constant in St. John the Baptist Parish Public Schools, located along the Mississippi River west of New Orleans.

Like many other states, Louisiana is preparing to implement the Common Core State Standards, along with Compass, a new evaluation rubric that applies a magnifying glass to the nuts and bolts of teaching practice. And in St. John the Baptist Parish, teachers and school leaders are being asked to make these changes a reality while facing declining budgets, a continued recovery from 2012's Hurricane Isaac, and persistent poverty -- nearly nine in ten of the district's students qualify for free and reduced lunch.

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Philip McIntoshOctober 1, 2013

The quality and skill of the teacher is one of the most important factors (if not the most important) influencing the success of any learning environment. But you can stand at the front of a classroom and teach until you are blue in the face, and it doesn't guarantee that any learning actually happens. So what separates successful teachers from less successful ones? Anyone will tell you that it's relationships. That's why it is critical to establish and maintain positive relationships with students throughout the school year. It's also not a bad idea to get some learning to happen while you're at it.

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Terry HeickSeptember 24, 2013

Teacher morale isn't a popular topic, and that makes sense on the surface. Teachers are professionals, like engineers, doctors, farmers or business leaders, and no one is going out of their way to make sure that engineers are "keeping their head up" or that farmers "feel good about their craft."

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José VilsonSeptember 13, 2013

This summer, I got the opportunity to visit NASA Kennedy Space Center through a generous grant from the General Electric Fund and the National Science Teachers Association. The partnership sponsored around a hundred of us to go to Cocoa Beach, Florida, and partake in a series of intense professional development sessions on campus. As a math teacher, I wasn't exactly sure what my purpose was there, but I knew two things: I wanted a rocket shuttle to take home, and I wanted to pretend to be an astronaut when I went back home.

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Todd FinleySeptember 13, 2013

Education is catastrophically deficient in trust. Pro-accountability education reformers presume that, absent carrots and sticks, classrooms would be overrun with lazy and incapable teachers. Traditional instructors presume that, absent carrots and sticks, classrooms would be overrun with lazy and incapable students. Both viewpoints emerge from a noble desire to make classrooms high-performance spaces, but in actuality they suppress excellence.

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Dr. Richard CurwinSeptember 10, 2013

Welcome back to school. I hope everyone had a fulfilling summer and is ready to greet our new school year and eager students for the beginning of what will be the best year of teaching in our lives so far. I spent part of the summer writing a new short-form book for ASCD (in production, due for release in January). Working on this project raised several questions for me that I think make great topics for postings. One issue in particular kept popping in my head as I researched topics in the new book: does educational research really matter?

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