Blogs on New Teachers

Blogs on New TeachersRSS
Nicholas ProvenzanoApril 22, 2014

Spring is here and teachers, like their students, are feeling the itch of summer. As educators prepare for the final stretch of the school year, it's often too easy to just keep their heads down and race for the finish line. Not so fast -- it's important to say thank you to those around you who've made the school year possible. This is not just a post for administrators to show the love to their staff, but for the staff to show the love to the administrators, secretaries, custodians, counselors -- and of course the students. Here are some simple things you can do to say "Thank you!" for all of the hard work everyone has put in this year.

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Margaret ReganApril 14, 2014

All good teaching originates from the motive of generosity. To help others understand history, literature, mathematics or science is the ground upon which all learning stands. Fundamentally, education is the transmission of wisdom from one scholar to another.

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Ben JohnsonMarch 19, 2014

After a hard day of teaching, I often plop down on my desk chair at home and gaze up at a framed drawing hanging on the wall above my desk that a dear friend of mine gave me. It is a detailed depiction of a pair of wood ducks serenely floating on a calm pond. One of the ducks is male that has brightly colored feathers and beak; the other is female that is plain gray and nondescript. Yet both are at peace and comfortable with each other.

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Andrew MillerMarch 10, 2014

Being a mentor teacher to a teaching candidate is quite a privilege and honor, as you are integral in nurturing and helping that new teacher to reflect and improve upon his or her instruction. I recently reached out to fellow mentor teachers and asked them about their advice and best practices, not only for teacher mentors, but also for new teachers in the field. Here are some great quotes and points from these practicing mentors.

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Andrew MillerMarch 4, 2014

It's been many years since I went through my teacher certification and student teaching, and wow! A lot has changed. And yet, there are still some stories of the journey to become a new teacher that remain the same. I recently reached out to my alma mater to speak not only with old professors, but also with current teacher candidates to ask them what it has been like for them.

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Nicholas ProvenzanoJanuary 21, 2014

We have entered the second half of the school year, and many of you are probably surprised that you've made it this far without killing someone. Those are very natural feelings, but you might not be able to last the rest of the school year if that's where your mind is at the moment. After ten years in the classroom, I've put together what I think are some excellent tips for making it through the second half of the school year in one piece -- and not in jail. See which of these strategies can make the next six months a piece of cake in your classroom.

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Elena AguilarJanuary 21, 2014

Since my last Edutopia blog post, How Slowing Down Can Lead to Great Change was published, I've received dozens of messages asking for suggestions for how to slow things down in schools. The premise behind the following suggestions is that if we slow down, we'll have more opportunities for reflection -- to think about what we've done and how it went, to consider next steps, and also to listen to each other and therefore, strengthen our connections. Here are some steps that anyone working in schools can take to slow down:

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David CutlerJanuary 20, 2014

I'm 23, almost fresh out of graduate school when I move to Miami to teach American history at Palmer Trinity, an independent school in Palmetto Bay. I have no friends or family nearby, and I'm completely unfamiliar with my surroundings. I'm also feverishly trying to get a firmer handle on my curriculum, and on making my lessons more relevant and engaging.

Today, my success as a teacher -- not to mention the lives of all the students I hope I have inspired and changed in my seven years in the classroom -- is directly related to the caring, high-quality mentorship I received during my first year of teaching. Without it, I would have become another statistic, quitting after my first few years on the job.

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Mark PhillipsJanuary 13, 2014

I think that one of the greatest challenges for teachers, including many of the best, is being frequently frustrated and self-critical because of personal expectations that they can never fully meet.

In his book Compassion and Self-Hate, the psychologist Theodore Rubin presents what he describes as indirect forms of self-hate. These are illusions we have about who we are supposed to be and unrealistic expectations of what we can accomplish. He includes, as one example, the illusion that if you have enough money, you'll be happy. Another is the illusion that physical beauty insures relational happiness. Each illusion he describes results in unrealistic expectations that make us self-critical and unhappy.

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Rachel LynetteJanuary 7, 2014

As a teacher, you probably create resources for students all the time. Perhaps you need a differentiated activity, an interactive game or CCSS-aligned lesson that isn't available commercially. Most likely, your stunning creations are only used in your classroom and shared with a few teammates.

What if teachers around the world could benefit from them, too? And how amazing would it be to get paid beyond your regular salary for what you create? This is the idea behind Teachers pay Teachers (TpT), an open marketplace for teacher resources.

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