Blogs on Middle (6-8)

Blogs on Middle (6-8)RSS
Suzie BossNovember 29, 2012

Although most students will be watching Inauguration Day festivities from afar on January 21, they can get into the spirit of the day by putting pen to paper, or voice to video, and offering some second-term advice for their newly reelected president.

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Bob LenzNovember 15, 2012

In my post, How an Ocean's Journey Inspires One School, I highlighted the worldwide voyage of the Hokule'a, a replica of an ancient double-hulled voyaging canoe and encouraged teachers and students to follow the journey. I also promised periodic updates and resources. Here is the first update and link to resources for students and teachers across the world:

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Douglas RushkoffNovember 13, 2012

Ask kids what Facebook is for, and they'll tell you it's there to help them make friends. And, on the surface anyway, that's what it looks like. Of course, anyone who has poked a bit deeper or thought a bit longer about it understands that people programming Facebook aren't sitting around wondering how to foster more enduring relationships for little Johnny, Janey and their friends, but rather how to monetize their social graphs -- the trail of data the site is busy accumulating about Johnny and Janey every second of the day and night.

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Ben JohnsonNovember 12, 2012

For the first two months of school, "When are the iPads going to be handed out?" was a continual mantra from students and teachers. But finally, when we were able to tell them a day, frustration turned into anticipation. Southside High School's goal was to efficiently assign an iPad to each ninth- and tenth-grader, without seriously impacting the regular instructional day. Boy, was that off target!

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Matt DavisOctober 25, 2012

The World Series kicked off last night in San Francisco, and during the next week, it might be on the your mind or the mind of some of your students. We know here at Edutopia, the series between the San Francisco Giants and the Detroit Tigers has certainly made its way into some of our watercooler conversations.

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Suzie BossOctober 25, 2012

With election season entering the final stretch, political discussions are at a fever pitch. Attack ads and debate "zingers" may be dominating the news, but they don't tell the whole story when it comes to how voters -- and future voters -- think and talk about important issues. In classrooms across the country, election-year projects are encouraging students to think more critically about topics ranging from immigration to the economy.

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Heather Wolpert-GawronOctober 22, 2012

It feels like we're on the precipice of a more common, universal implementation for blended learning, but for a while still, blended learning is still dependent on teachers knowing what to teach and how to teach it. It still feels still like a grassroots movement from key teachers who are looking ahead to the future. We know that being able to function online is a 21st-century skill, but for some teachers, it's still as futuristic as Logan's Run.

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Steve J. MooreOctober 20, 2012

Writing Alongside Students

The term “workshop model” is one used in my school district at the moment to denote a classroom where something innovative is being piloted. My neighbor’s classroom is a place where new ideas are being shaped and tinkered with each day; I like the idea that there are little pedagogical laboratories being run all around me.

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Paul GigliottiOctober 17, 2012

The election year is a great time for social studies education; presidential and congressional campaigns are such a large part of the news and daily conversations that they have sparked the curiosity of even the youngest students. A student response system combined with an interactive whiteboard can bring lessons to life by giving students a hands-on "voter" experience.

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Kiera ChaseOctober 16, 2012

Not every teacher gets to hear these words: the process of making "this video gave me a better understanding of how teachers teacher, so when I am faced with a math problem that I don't understand I can break it down and teach it to myself." This quote came from a ninth-grade student at the culmination of the Upside Down Academy project.

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