Blogs on Media Literacy

Blogs on Media LiteracyRSS
Ainissa RamirezSeptember 18, 2013

The New York Times dubbed 2012 as the Year of the MOOC. In case you are Rip van Winkle waking from a long, deep slumber, a MOOC is a massive open online course, which can have enrollments in the thousands. It's easy to calculate that one MOOC can reach more students in one semester than in an entire teaching career. (And I'll be the first to admit there are pluses and minuses to this format. But that is another discussion, another blog.)

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Matt LevinsonAugust 28, 2013

The old saying "Do as I say, not as I do" could not apply more to adults when dealing with kids and technology. Modeling is so important, and when it comes to digital life, adults set the bar pretty low for their kids.

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Mary Beth HertzAugust 28, 2013

Many schools will be receiving new technology in a few weeks, and they'll need a plan for supporting and coaching teachers through the process of using this new technology effectively in their classrooms. This week I received an email from a friend and fellow educator who was seeking ideas for a new technology coach position at her school this fall. Here are three pieces of advice I gave her.

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Beth HollandAugust 15, 2013

Think about 2008 for a minute. Wikipedia was only two years old, and Facebook had only existed for four. I was supporting a research project with a group of sixth graders studying ancient history. Throughout the process, I asked student after student, "Where did you get this information?"

The stock response: "On Google."

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Kendra Cameron JarvisAugust 14, 2013

Teachers have a new obsession: Pinterest. With over 500,000 education pins pinned daily and 48.7 million users each month, Pinterest is fast becoming a go-to site for busy educators in search of lesson plans, book recommendations, classroom organization ideas and more.

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Ashley NahornickAugust 5, 2013

"For students, the best classroom experience is a space of possibility." - Anne Stevens1

Design thinking can transform your classroom into a space of creativity, excitement and possibility. The design thinking process involves rethinking and reframing problems to make things easier, more streamlined or different. Jackie Gerstein attests that design thinking is an important skill for students to learn as part of their education.2

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Todd FinleyJuly 26, 2013

"There is not a writer in our classrooms today who will not be producing something with a digital writing tool in her or his lifetime." -- Troy Hicks

Troy Hicks frequently uses the words "intentional" and "deliberate" to highlight the need for writers to conscientiously think through composing digital texts. Those two words could just as easily describe the author's thoughtful affect on Paul Allison's Teachers Teaching Teachers or the degree to which his new book, Crafting Digital Writing: Composing Texts Across Media and Genres, methodically articulates how 4th-12th grade instructors can introduce technology tools, mentor texts, composing practices, and heuristics for helping students write.

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Matthew FarberJuly 24, 2013

Over the years, many video games with social themes have been developed. In 2005, the United Nations World Food Programme released Food Force. Food Force was a downloadable game, developed by game publisher Konami, in which players delivered food to people in need. Another game for social change was MTV's Darfur Is Dying. Released in 2006, this online game put players in the role of a refugee in civil war-torn Darfur.

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Diane DarrowJuly 24, 2013

"The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." - Albert Einstein

We do not need to teach creativity, but rather inspire its daily practice. Somewhere along the way, we simply forgot to honor this innate gift and how to access its power. Our role as educators is to encourage learning experiences that increase the ability to recognize and listen to our inner voice.

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Suzie BossJuly 11, 2013

After seven years of leading an innovative high school near Oslo, Norway, Ann Michaelsen had acquired some keen insights about what it means to be a global learner with ready access to technology. So she decided to write a book. Not just any book, mind you. Connected Learners: A Step-by-Step Guide to Creating a Global Classroom, a 219-page digital book, features a cover picture of a group of teens (and one adult) standing in the snow. The byline tells the rest of the story: by 27 students and their teacher Ann Michaelsen, Sandvika High School, Norway.

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