Blogs on Lesson Plans

Blogs on Lesson PlansRSS
Matt DavisJanuary 29, 2013

This week, there might be a bit of Super Bowl energy and excitement running through your classroom, and there are a number of great ways to wrangle those murmurs into teachable moments.

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Matt DavisJanuary 28, 2013

Editor's Note: In addition to 6 great resources from last year, we've updated this post to include new tools for the 2014 Black History Month theme, "Civil Rights in America." Here are some of the best virtual museum tours, lesson plans and digital multimedia packages from a variety of sources. (Updated 01/2014)

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Ashley ProphetJanuary 18, 2013

Organized debates are an engaging way to help students discover, explore and organize ideas during the writing process. However, neither my teacher colleagues nor students share my enthusiasm. To find out why, I asked how they felt about using debate in the classroom. Here were their responses:

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Andrew MillerJanuary 7, 2013

Worksheets matter! I know we hear a lot of talking points that tell us to get rid of them, but I think it's much more complicated than that. That call for "no more worksheets" comes from a place where that is all there is. By that I mean classrooms where students do nothing but worksheets. Often these worksheets are de-contextualized from relevant work, and this is where there's an opportunity to reframe and refine the traditional worksheet. There is a time and place for drill and practice or individual practice -- even in a PBL project. The key is to make it appropriate and relevant.

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Susan RileyNovember 30, 2012

These days, integration in any area, be it STEM or the arts, seems to be the buzzword to curriculum designers everywhere. There are so many resources floating around out there with the claim of integrating content areas. Yet, true integration is often difficult to find. Indeed, integration is a rare yet seemingly "magical" approach that has the capacity to turn learning into meaningful practice.

Which of course, as any teacher will tell you, is anything but magic.

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Suzie BossNovember 29, 2012

Although most students will be watching Inauguration Day festivities from afar on January 21, they can get into the spirit of the day by putting pen to paper, or voice to video, and offering some second-term advice for their newly reelected president.

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Matt DavisOctober 30, 2012

The power of nature was felt throughout the Northeast last night, as devastating Hurricane Sandy hammered the East Coast. For students and teachers looking to help out, the Huffington Post published this list of ways you can lend a hand.

Now, as students ask about the cause and effect of the storm -- here are a couple of resources to help guide the classroom discussion. We'll start with a special hurricane episode of Sesame Street for younger students.

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It's late October, and kids' minds are turning to costuming and candy, marauding and merriment -- yes, this is Halloween time! While parents get mired in guilt over fair-trade candy and childhood obesity issues and some schools ban Halloween celebrations altogether, many teachers take advantage of the excitement in the crisp autumn air and brew up some activities related to All Hallow's Eve.

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Matt DavisOctober 25, 2012

The World Series kicked off last night in San Francisco, and during the next week, it might be on the your mind or the mind of some of your students. We know here at Edutopia, the series between the San Francisco Giants and the Detroit Tigers has certainly made its way into some of our watercooler conversations.

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Paul GigliottiOctober 17, 2012

The election year is a great time for social studies education; presidential and congressional campaigns are such a large part of the news and daily conversations that they have sparked the curiosity of even the youngest students. A student response system combined with an interactive whiteboard can bring lessons to life by giving students a hands-on "voter" experience.

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