Blogs on Financial Literacy

Blogs on Financial LiteracyRSS
Brian PageMarch 31, 2014

Most high school students are making financial choices now. Many shop, have jobs, pay bills, are eligible for tax refunds if they file, have accounts at financial institutions, make car payments, pay car insurance -- and most importantly, college-bound students are preparing to make a student debt choice. Financial literacy lessons help these kids grapple with the adult choices they already face as teenagers. Following are three lesson principles I apply when preparing my financial literacy lessons.

Read More
Brian PageMarch 28, 2014

My oldest son is in middle school. He earns an allowance and is always trying out his entrepreneurial skills. What my son and his friends seem to have in common is that they want . . . everything! He's eager to learn about money management because he views it as a means to an end. So my suggestion to you is focusing on teaching middle school kids the concepts that will naturally engage them, because they're meaningful right now.

Read More
Brian PageMarch 27, 2014

My daughter is in elementary school. She hates math, but she loves to count her own money! I have used her allowance to help bring basic mathematics alive, including some of the lessons created by the U.S. President's Advisory Council on Financial Capability exhibited on the website Money As You Grow. These are 20 essential, age-appropriate financial lessons -- with corresponding activities -- written explicitly for parents. At a time when parents are most involved with their children's lives, this is an ideal resource to engage them about teaching money management skills at home.

Read More
Brian PageOctober 17, 2013

The goal of this lesson is teaching students how to use their mobile phones for financial management and financial decision-making. The best moment to provide dedicated financial literacy coursework is in the latter grades of high school. A "just in time" financial education is student- and behavior-centered, and incorporates tools that our students use every day -- such as their mobile phones.

Read More
Andrew MillerMarch 12, 2013

Financial Literacy Month is April -- just around the corner -- and it's never too early to prepare. Personally, I believe this is a great opportunity to use games in an intentional way to teach students financial literacy skills. Games can be used as a "hook" or anchor activity, as well an instructional activity that is revisited throughout a unit of instruction. A game can help scaffold the learning of important content as well as providing context for application of content. If you really trust the design of the game, it can also be an excellent assessment tool!

Read More
Tanya KnightOctober 18, 2012

There are many international students who desire to study in U.S. colleges, and therefore, many are exploring the different avenues to fund their college expenses. Fortunately, there are plenty of resources for funding. This blog presents a guide to finding these resources that will hopefully make those students' transitions easier.

Read More
Tanya KnightOctober 3, 2012

The one major factor that prevents millions of deserving students from going to college is absence of financial resources. Tragically this is often due to lack of awareness about how and where to get them. Fortunately the financial aid process is not hard if you have the information you need.

Read More
Jeff LivingstonMay 7, 2012

As May begins, high school seniors are enjoying their final weeks in school before graduation. In just a few months, they will be stepping onto college campuses for the first time and entering a new chapter.

Read More

No matter what your political leanings are, most people get a little stressed during tax season, and teachers are no exception. Since April 15th is tax day in the U.S., I've put together a collection of fun short videos -- a few to learn about income tax, but mostly to indulge in some much-needed tax-time humor.

Read More
Brian PageNovember 29, 2011

If you have followed the news lately, you have likely read about the looming college debt crisis. In October, the Economist published The Next Big Credit Bubble, and soon thereafter TIME Magazine published College Graduates Face Record-High Debt In the Age of Record-High Unemployment which is essentially saying the same thing. Some high school students are getting the message, and we need to make sure they react appropriately. College is an investment in yourself, and like any investment, you should spend the appropriate amount of money for the anticipated return on your investment. In other words, do not go $200,000 into debt majoring in French poetry.

Read More