Blogs on Education Reform

Blogs on Education ReformRSS
Mark PhillipsDecember 20, 2012

I hope that many of you took a peek at my blog about my favorite 2012 movies for educators and parents. Well here's phase two, my favorite 2012 books for teachers and parents.

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Jay McTigheDecember 7, 2012

Editor's note: This is the fifth post in a five-part series which takes a look at five big ideas for implementation of the Common Core State Standards, authored by Jay McTighe and Grant Wiggins.

A prevalent misconception about standards in general is that they simply specify learning goals to be achieved. A more complete and accurate conception, in line with the colloquial meaning of the term, recognizes that standards also refer to the desired qualities of student work and the degree of rigor that must be assessed and achieved.

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Jay McTigheDecember 6, 2012

Editor's note: This is the fourth post in a five-part series which takes a look at five big ideas for implementation of the Common Core State Standards, authored by Jay McTighe and Grant Wiggins

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Jay McTigheDecember 5, 2012

Editor's note: This is the third post in a five-part series which takes a look at five big ideas for implementation of the Common Core State Standards, authored by Jay McTighe and Grant Wiggins

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Jay McTigheDecember 4, 2012

Editor's note: This is the second post in a five-part series which takes a look at five big ideas for implementation of the Common Core State Standards, authored by Jay McTighe and Grant Wiggins

The Introduction to the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) for Mathematics makes a noteworthy point: “These Standards do not dictate curriculum or teaching methods.” (p 5). A similar point is offered by the ELA Standards:

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Jay McTigheDecember 4, 2012

Editor's note: This is the first post in a five-part series which takes a look at five big ideas for implementation of the Common Core State Standards, authored by Jay McTighe and Grant Wiggins

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The end of the year is certainly a time for reflection, but it's also ripe for predictions for the year to come, and the chatter on social media about what's next for education is deafening. Blended learning! 1:1 devices! Flipped classrooms! Gamification! Design thinking! And each new idea that comes along generates a cadre of proselytizers and naysayers. While experienced educators know there's no silver bullet, one must admit it feels like a sea change is in the air.

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John MaedaOctober 2, 2012

As the nation embarks on a new school year, education leaders from President Obama on down are facing a renewed commitment to the STEM subjects -- Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics -- as a driver of innovation. And what better advertisement of the power of STEM education than the recent landing of the Mars Rover? Like the original Apollo missions to the Moon, they powerfully reveal the magic of science and engineering. Just this summer, the Obama administration announced a laudable new "teacher corps" dedicated to excellence in the STEM subjects, and as far and wide as Estonia, a new policy is spurring debate about the value of teaching programming to elementary school students.

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Mark PhillipsSeptember 26, 2012

The film Won't Back Down is scheduled to open in wide release on September 28. Yet, weeks in advance of this date, there has been a veritable deluge of extremely strong emotional and critical responses. Both the film and the responses deserve our attention, because they are each symptomatic of the polarization that is plaguing both public education and national politics in this country. Every teacher and parent should see the film, but should also be fully prepared to view it critically.

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Matt DavisSeptember 24, 2012

Last week, several thought-provoking studies made the news. Here's a look at a few studies and other interesting stories -- including a school district that pays for college, a case for why Wikipedia should be used in the classroom, and a look at how high-stakes testing can encourage cheating.

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