Blogs on Technology Integration

Technology Integration

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Discover fresh ideas for using technology in the classroom and at home to improve learning, encourage collaboration, and increase student engagement.

Bryan KitchSeptember 26, 2013

The morning of Saturday, June 15 marked the beginning of the 24-hour Activate-Ed educational hackathon. "HACKtivate ED" was the brainchild of four Analyst Fellows with Education Pioneers, seeking to connect educational luminaries from San Francisco Bay Area school districts with tech sector developers to tackle key issues affecting K-12 students. The event, organized by Chian Gong, Han Hong, Thu Cung and Roxanne Phen, invited developers, designers, educators and analysts to begin a much-needed conversation.

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Mark GuraSeptember 26, 2013

Having been involved with student robotics programs for many years, I feel that robotics just may be the most perfect instructional approach currently available. It offers classroom activities that teach high-value STEM content as well as opportunities to powerfully address ELA Common Core Standards. In fact, there are connections to robotics across the full spectrum of the curriculum. Robotics is also a highly effective way to foster essential work skills like collaboration, problem solving and project management. It does all this while keeping kids so motivated and engaged that getting them to stop working and move on to the rest of the school day can be a challenge -- a good problem to have!

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Monica BurnsSeptember 25, 2013

An expectation of the Common Core Learning Standards is that teachers differentiate their instruction to meet the needs of all children. This includes special education and general education students, as well as English-Language Learners. One of my favorite technology tools, the QR code, can be used to meet the needs of a variety of students in one classroom. Teachers can create QR codes for differentiated instruction activities.

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Beth HollandSeptember 23, 2013

"Television rots your brain." In a similar vein, video games turn your mind to mush, and staring at a screen for too long potentially makes you a zombie. In 1999, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) published a report suggesting that children under two should not have any screen time. Since the release of that report, numerous studies have emerged to address this issue of screen time, from the 2012 report Facing the Screen Dilemma: Young Children, Technology and Early Education to Lisa Guernsey's Screen Time: How Electronic Media - From Baby Videos to Educational Software - Affects Your Young Child.

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Nicholas ProvenzanoSeptember 23, 2013

The school year has started, and teachers across the country are excited to try out all the cool new tools they learned about during their "summer off." It's great to know there are so many educators out there ready to introduce something new and exciting in their classroom, but I have three tips to help you make sure that you get the most out of them.

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Ainissa RamirezSeptember 18, 2013

The New York Times dubbed 2012 as the Year of the MOOC. In case you are Rip van Winkle waking from a long, deep slumber, a MOOC is a massive open online course, which can have enrollments in the thousands. It's easy to calculate that one MOOC can reach more students in one semester than in an entire teaching career. (And I'll be the first to admit there are pluses and minuses to this format. But that is another discussion, another blog.)

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Monica BurnsSeptember 17, 2013

Finding ways to integrate technology and align instruction to the Common Core Learning Standards can be a challenge. Part of making sure that students are college and career ready goes beyond rigorous class work and should include interaction with 21st century technology.

Let's take a look at two Common Core Anchor Standards in Reading. These anchor standards are written generally for grades K-12, and each has grade-specific standards that address the particular skill sets necessary for each level of students.

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José VilsonSeptember 13, 2013

This summer, I got the opportunity to visit NASA Kennedy Space Center through a generous grant from the General Electric Fund and the National Science Teachers Association. The partnership sponsored around a hundred of us to go to Cocoa Beach, Florida, and partake in a series of intense professional development sessions on campus. As a math teacher, I wasn't exactly sure what my purpose was there, but I knew two things: I wanted a rocket shuttle to take home, and I wanted to pretend to be an astronaut when I went back home.

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Monica BurnsSeptember 6, 2013

The Common Core Learning Standards describe the importance of teaching students how to comprehend informational text. They are asked to read closely, make inferences, cite evidence, analyze arguments and interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text. Primary source documents are artifacts created by individuals during a particular period in history. This could be a letter, speech, photograph or journal entry. If you're looking to integrate social studies into your literacy block, try out one of these resources for primary source documents.

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Beth HollandSeptember 5, 2013

Introducing new technology into the classroom, especially iPads, can be overwhelming -- even daunting. When first getting started, the technology may seem like more of a distraction than a learning opportunity. So how do you begin?

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