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I love *creating* writing prompts -- it's one of the most challenging parts of being an English teacher. My students don't do much writing like the five assignments at the beginning of your post, but I think a sprinkling of "superficial" ones is a good idea. They are playful and fun -- and having that experience of writing can be very significant for students who dread and loathe essays and other more-complex projects.

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Thanks, Monica. Hope you'll

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Thanks, Monica. Hope you'll write and say how they went. -Todd

Agreed!

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Todd,
I always love your articles but rarely respond. This one hits a resounding chord with me. I work with teachers all over Florida and workshop this same idea. I suggest there is a difference between a prompt and a topic. We so often call the writing topic we provide "prompts" but really we are giving our student topics.
This happens most often when teachers only assign test "prompts" or reading-based "prompts." I see a prompt as a way of giving students something to work with in order to generate their own topic.
I provide one word prompts often: blue, 38, hunger....
Each of these require students to generate their own topics. To help direct the writing into a form, each prompt does not become a complete piece, but a brainstorm. This is another missed step in the process...
We also foucs on one genre a week--so using blue, 38, hunger... the students will be writing a personal essay. This means the prompts should generate something personally relating to them.
I also use images a lot, too. Thanks, Todd, for another honest article.
Tamara Doehring
The English Teacher's Friend

Teacher of the Handicapped, Hamilton Township, New Jersey

Hello Todd, Thank you so much

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Hello Todd,
Thank you so much for all of the creative writing prompt ideas! I am looking forward to using them with my students.
Monica Bruder

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