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Computer Fundamentals,Computer Science and IT Integrator from Camilla, GA

Well said Timothy. WOW!! We

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Well said Timothy. WOW!! We do make the ripples and should be lead learners. We can't expect kids to learn when we're close minded about learning something new - the hypocrisy of such an attitude makes me furious. But you are so right. WISE words from a teacher who is pushing to be more. Thank you for sharing them, I actually needed to hear those today.

[quote]We must all be reflective practitioners in order to ensure our students are making the most out of their education. I feel when teachers model "true grit" in classroom behavior a ripple effect will occur with the students. As teachers we all face many challenges daily that can be seen as unsurpassable obstacles. Without displaying some characteristics of grit we can never achieve a learning environment deserving of all children in the classroom. I enjoyed reading this article and the post to this article. The collaboration among all in defining the term grit is an excellent example of an effective collaboration in the learning environment. I end with what I feel is a perfect quote that is a resulting of teachers with grit,"Education is not the filling of a pail but the lighting of a fire." --William Butler Yeats[/quote]

Computer Fundamentals,Computer Science and IT Integrator from Camilla, GA

Alexandra - Mike has some

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Alexandra - Mike has some great suggestions, but I have been pulling information from a new book called "The Winners Brain" and sharing examples from research that show that you can impact your ability. When students know that their decisions can impact their ability to learn, it helps. These things are often very subtle. I would say to first educator yourself by reading books like Duhigg's "The Power of Habit" and Tough's "Why Children Succeed" so you have stories to tell and then, as you have opportunities, share those stories with your students. If you're afraid you'll get off track have a "2 Minute Tip" and time yourself. Make it fun and challenge them to bring in stories of people who overcome or achieve great things.

The focus, though, is to get off this notion of "luck" and move to the facts behind what makes success - persistence striving towards a laser focused goal. Thank you for jumping in and asking this question and thank you to the other teachers who have replied as well! What a great community!

Computer Fundamentals,Computer Science and IT Integrator from Camilla, GA

Mike, I'd love if everyone

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Mike, I'd love if everyone would reread what you said and that they WILL watch the Dan Pink video about motivation. (I watch this with students.) I think that resilience and understanding that the brain can change and grow like a muscle is important. Ultimately students decide what they are going to do and instrinsic motivation is unstoppable. Extrensic is always easier but as Pink demonstrates, when you apply it the wrong way, it can kill creativity.

GREAT POINTS and I hope readers will take time to watch the video you mentioned. This is just one more example of how the Edutopia community really adds to the conversation. Now, we have a blog post but we also have a wealth of ideas of how this is being done in the classroom. Great words here.
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I don't pretend to have all of the answers, but it helps if students are invested in the topic ... if they feel it is relevant to their lives ... if there is a problem to solve ... if there is some discrepant event to grab their attention. Not very long ago I saw a TED talk by Daniel Pink about motivation (http://new.ted.com/talks/dan_pink_on_motivation... there is also a GREAT animated version: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u6XAPnuFjJc) where he spells out some surprising ideas about how motivations such as money, grades, or similar extrinsic rewards become DISincentives when the task involves thinking or creativity. Very worth watching..[/quote]

High School Science Teacher

[quote]How could you

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[quote]How could you encourage grit as a student teacher? Currently, I am working in a classroom that I do not have content control over. I would love to administer the grit scale test and show the grit video. However, I do not have that type of authority within my classroom. I am struggling greatly with students that lack persistence no matter how encouraging I try to be. Any suggestions?[/quote]

This seems to be a more and more common issue. Things are happening so fast in kids' lives now. They are inundated with tremendous amounts of information every day. It is harder to encourage students to focus on thinking deeply about any one subject for a length of time.

I don't pretend to have all of the answers, but it helps if students are invested in the topic ... if they feel it is relevant to their lives ... if there is a problem to solve ... if there is some discrepant event to grab their attention. Not very long ago I saw a TED talk by Daniel Pink about motivation (http://new.ted.com/talks/dan_pink_on_motivation ... there is also a GREAT animated version: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u6XAPnuFjJc ) where he spells out some surprising ideas about how motivations such as money, grades, or similar extrinsic rewards become DISincentives when the task involves thinking or creativity. Very worth watching.

In addition, I'd say to you just watch and learn what you can. Decide how you want to do things. Write things down. Plan. But most likely you will be best suited to wait until you get your own classroom to implement these things. Many teachers are notoriously habit driven, for better or worse. It would likely cause friction in your situation.

Have lunch with the teacher and discuss it. If they are open, then try a few small things, but remember that even if they agree with you, it is unlikely that any sweeping changes will happen before the start of the next school year. It's just bad practice to change the classroom management system in the middle of the year unless there is an extreme need.

Teachers are creatures of habit for a reason. It works. Students need routine. I have a habit of reflection and research. I keep an open mind. But even I do not change how I do things in my classroom unless there is an extreme circumstance.

We have to setup routines for students during the first week of school and have high expectations that they will follow along throughout the year. And it doesn't work if we change things midstream. So plan for next year and at the start of each semester have 2 or 3 major things you want to try, explain them and model them for the kids, and then stick to it. Routine and habit are our friends.

Biology Teacher in the Making!!

How could you encourage grit

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How could you encourage grit as a student teacher? Currently, I am working in a classroom that I do not have content control over. I would love to administer the grit scale test and show the grit video. However, I do not have that type of authority within my classroom. I am struggling greatly with students that lack persistence no matter how encouraging I try to be. Any suggestions?

8th grade S.C. history teacher from Charleston, South Carolina

We must all be reflective

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We must all be reflective practitioners in order to ensure our students are making the most out of their education. I feel when teachers model "true grit" in classroom behavior a ripple effect will occur with the students. As teachers we all face many challenges daily that can be seen as unsurpassable obstacles. Without displaying some characteristics of grit we can never achieve a learning environment deserving of all children in the classroom. I enjoyed reading this article and the post to this article. The collaboration among all in defining the term grit is an excellent example of an effective collaboration in the learning environment. I end with what I feel is a perfect quote that is a resulting of teachers with grit,"Education is not the filling of a pail but the lighting of a fire." --William Butler Yeats

Founder of The Center for Resilient Leadership

I think that grit is a

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I think that grit is a cognitive skill requiring higher level thinking. In particular, grit requires impulse control--choosing to forgo immediate gratification in exchange for long-term gains. It is an investment mindset, thinking that is squarely within the prefrontal cortex.

In the case of the Millenials, I think we are seeing an interesting split. We have a group that fits into the "teacup generation," that relies heavily on immediate feedback and gratification (after being so overprotected, one they finally face a challenge they shatter like teacups) and we see an amazing group emerging that defies these stereotypes with phenomenal grit and tenacity.

What is Grit? I like the

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What is Grit?

I like the definition for Grit that I found in Wikipedia, "Grit in psychology is a positive, non-cognitive trait based on an individual’s passion for a particular long-term goal or endstate coupled with a powerful motivation to achieve their respective objective.”

I think that phrase “Non-cognitive” is an important consideration because it doesn’t link to high or lower order thinking. It has to do with the disposition of the learner. It is an affective trait.

They also noted that "Duckworth et al (2007) defines Grit as a stable trait that does not require immediate positive feedback. Individuals high in Grit are able to maintain their determination and motivation over long periods despite experiences with failure and adversity. Their passion and commitment towards the long-term objective is the overriding factor that provides the stamina required to “stay the course” amid challenges and set-backs. Essentially, the Grittier person is focused on winning the marathon, not the sprint."

An interesting aspect of this realization is that millennials are known for their need for immediate feedback. Does that mean that they don't have grit? If so, then how can they have achieved all that they have done?

Author of YA novel, special educator

I think it is quite

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I think it is quite challenging to develop grit in a 9th grader who has been coddled at home. Parents must be included in the quest to develop grit.

Founder of The Center for Resilient Leadership

Kimball, I love your use of

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Kimball, I love your use of the word "deliberate." We are all building grit (or not) all of the time. The key is for educators, parents, & other leaders (corporate, military, etc) to be more deliberate about using challenges as opportunities to teach it. So many "teachable moments" are lost!

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