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I will be visiting your links

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I will be visiting your links shortly! I agree with every point you make and I strongly believe in Multiple Intelligences. I have seen how this theory works/applies in myself, students I have taught and worked with, my own children, and many others similar to those Howard Gardner observed. We know children develop in different areas at various times and degrees. Approaching learning through multiple intelligences is, in my opinion, the best experience through which we can help children/students progress to higher forms of thought in ALL areas. This is, as you, and others, have stated, what makes the difference in authentic understanding and learning. Thank you for your input!

Freelance online content writer for latest upgoing niches

Thanks for sharing

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Thanks for sharing informative article on abstract thinking. I would love to share an idea to develop abstract thinking into teenagers " Provide the teens with a list of items. Ask the teens to think about each item in an abstract way and give them five to 10 minutes to write down their abstract thoughts"

Executive Director, Founder of Arts & Learning Conservatory

A great article on

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A great article on abstraction, teenagers are prone to lot of problems they are actually in a well of problems where they cannot understand what to do, parental guidance is very important as these issues can lead to complete depression , thanks for sharing the content that is so helpful.

Critically thinking about abstract concepts is cross-curricular

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I enjoyed your article about abstraction. It made me uncomfortable at first because your focus was on math and physics for teenagers; however, as I continued reading, I saw how much it applied to me situation as an English inclusion teacher. It is often difficult for me to translate the abstract questions to more simpler, concrete ones in order to accurately assess my students comprehension and analytical abilities. Thank you for sharing your research.

Director of the Virginia Beach School of the Arts

Music, Learning and the Brain Lecturer

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Environment has more affect on abstract reasoning than genetics. Did you know the executive function areas of the brain develop a lot between 5-10 and then basically regress in the adolescent years. Then at 18, they "turn on" again. Teachers need to know the dramatic chemical and physical changes in the brain that occur in high schoolers. And emotional development has a great influence on these skills as well. Comments welcome. Faculty development and continuing education workshop information available at virginia@acadamiacs.com.

Host and Co-Creator of Virtual Science University

Enhance The Development of a Teenager's Abstract Reasoning

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Hi Shawn,

(The importance of abstraction measurement cannot be overstated. We're educating generations of people who disavow math as arcane and perhaps even occult. Why? Because we didn't honor their need for concreteness as a transition into doing real math).
I am using your paragraph above to make a couple of points!

Over thirty years of teaching the biological sciences and the physical sciences, I believe the ability to develop abstract reasoning can be enhanced by using the intellects of the students using the "Multiple Intelligence Model" of Howard Gardner Ph. D. Let me give you an example. I am going to use the example of TJ who is actually a fictitious name but a real person who was in one of my Pre-AP Chemistry Classes about six years ago when I was using the Seven Multiple Intellects of Howard Gardner Ph. D. Since then, I've learned there are actually nine intellects. TJ was a student whose intelligence and giftedness are very high but lazy when applying his intellect capability in class and in the lab. When it came to doing Mole problems, he went bananas, telling me and the class, "I am not doing this! This is too hard! This is worst than Algebra II!" At the beginning of the school year, I had given the class a checklist similar to the one found on this link:
http://www.bsapp.com/multipleintelligences/AdobeDocsforWeb/SevenIntellig...
TJ on his Checklist Scores had the following numbers for the Seven Intellects listed at the end of the above link. Those numbers were 7-8-3-9-9-8-3 His intellectual weakness was with Spatial-Visual Intelligence (capacity to think in images and pictures, to visualize accurately and abstractly) and Intrapersonal (capacity to be self-aware and in tune with inner feelings, values, beliefs and thinking processes). In both of these intellects, he had a 3. In his Lab Group of three other students besides TJ, I paired TJ up with two students one of which had a 9 in the Spatial Visual Intellect and the other which had also a 9 in the Intrapersonal Intellect. The 4th student in the Lab group had a 9 in Verbal Linguistic and a 9 in Musical Intelligence. With this student, TJ could identify since both were strong with the Musical Intelligence and TJ was also fairly strong with Verbal Linguistic. To make my points, using the Intelligence Checklist mention on the link above, I was able to set up my lab groups where all members of any given Lab Group complimented each other. The last point is that TJ knocked the concept of the Mole on his Exit Science Exam administered by the Texas Education Agency. TJ not only proved on my Semester Exam that TJ had mastered the concept TJ most feared but also mastered it on the Texas Science Aptitude Test known as the Exit Science TAKS Test! TAKS stands for Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills. For more stories like TJ and testimonials about the efficiency of Briones MILC (Multiple Inputs Learning Concept), visit my online teaching site, Virtual Science University at www.virtualscienceuniversity.com
In conclusion I communicated last summer with Howard Gardner Ph. D. at Harvard University. To learn more about what he said visit the following VSU Newsletter link: http://www.virtualscienceuniversity.com/news.aspx?id=4d98c74f-fa26-4130-...

determining level of abstract thinking

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Shawn, you might find answers to the two questions that you ask at the end of your essay by looking at the new approach to assessment developed by Lectica (lectica.org). This approach is entirely consistent with the ideas and issues that you explore.

Learning Specialist: Technology for Stratford Hall

Hi Shawn, I wonder how much

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Hi Shawn,

I wonder how much of our ability to reason abstractly is based on genetic factors, and how much of it is based on experience. We know that other animals have some limited ability to reason abstractly, and so it seems likely that genetics plays a role, but I wonder how strongly the role of culture and experience plays in our ability to develop abstract reasoning, and at what age that typically happens.

I wonder how many students would never develop abstract reasoning if we didn't drag them into experiences where they need it to cope?

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