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Preservice Teacher

This was an awesome list.

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This was an awesome list. When you call out a student that you know doesn't know the answer, you are kind of embarrassing the child in front of their classmates. Also relating this towards Christmas is an amazing idea. Loved it overall.

George: On the first day of

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George: On the first day of each school year I would tell all of my students that I was going to respect them first, and then I expected it back from them. When my students wanted to try to answer but hesitated because they were unsure of themselves, my standard line delivered in a laid back manor was "oh., just spit it out and we'll fix it." I was a high school social studies teacher in Connecticut for 15 years before being bullied so badly by my principal that I resigned two years ago and have not taught since. I was diagnosed with ADHD about 10 years ago but had no issues once my neurologist and I settled on the correct medication and dosage. When the harassment started it totally negated the affect of the medication and by the time I left I had most major symptoms of PTSD. I hold a Masters in Teaching and a Sixth Year in Administration and am certified to teach and hold a principal's position. Sadly, the trauma I experienced was so great that I will never teach again. Fortunately, my education and personal drive allowed me to amass an impressive array of skill sets upon which to fall back on.
Thanks for posting your nuggets of wisdom.

ESL/English teacher from Manteo, North Carolina

This is the best list that I

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This is the best list that I have seen for some period of time. I use this list in my own classroom; however, I have never shared it with anyone. Thank you for sharing this list with others within education.

Education Specialist

If you truly "respect the

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If you truly "respect the dignity of each student" should you be judging their answers? Should you be giving "credit"? We can all facilitate education w/o the trappings of power which we sometimes fall into the habit of imposing.

Instructional Coach, Leadership Coach, Math Specialist

Saying you're sorry

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Awesome list, Nick! In fact, I've written a few posts on Ed Week that support some of your points. I especially encourage you and your readers to check out Great Teachers: Perfectly Imperfect for two true stories that speak to the power of educators apologizing--or, in one case, NOT apologizing--when we hurt kids.

Kindergarten Teacher and Owner & Founder of HeidiSongs.com

I agree with George

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I agree with George Peternel's comment above.
In addition, I have issues with Rule Number 2. The problem with the rule number 2, "Moving to the Next Lesson Whether or Not All Students Understood the Previous One," is that often teachers are not actually given the choices about when and if they can begin and end a unit of study. (First, let me make it clear that I am not referring to my own Kindergarten classroom or even my own district!) But having spoken with many teachers nationwide, I know that many are told to follow certain programs and must cover a certain amount of material in a certain amount of time, no matter what. Some are told to "keep their expectations high," and it doesn't matter that they can see that their students are not ready for certain tasks. Yet they must ask their students to do them anyway.
These days, it is often the administrators that are calling the shots on what teachers teach and when they teach it. The teachers are left accountable for the results, but are often making very few of the instructional decisions that produce the test scores. For example, some teachers are told to teach by following a script, but the script doesn't meet the needs of their students they know it. However, they are powerless to change the lesson because deviating from the research based, scripted program is not allowed. This is the policy set in place by the administrators. (Again, I am not referring to anything happening in my own school or district, but to conversations that I have had with teachers nationwide.)
The ELFS need to put those administrators on the Naughty list, not the teachers. It's not their decision, and it's not their fault.

Education Specialist

3 rules to insure inclusion

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3 rules to insure inclusion on the nice list:
1. No grades.
2. No tests.
3. No compulsory courses.

Retired Principal

A guiding principle for all

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A guiding principle for all of these nuggets of wisdom is that a "nice" teacher overtly respects the dignity of each of his/her students. And when a student doesn't know the correct answer, give some "partial" credit. Like "close, very close." Or, "No, but that would be the correct answer to ______ (and pose a related question) but not to the question. Do you want to try again?"

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