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WHAT WORKS IN EDUCATION The George Lucas Educational Foundation
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Science Inquiry Carnival: Inquiry-Based Projects for the Classroom

Eric Brunsell

Asst Professor of Science Education @ UW-Oshkosh

I have written a few posts here about science inquiry and providing students with authentic science experience. This week, I thought I would showcase a few other bloggers that are writing about science inquiry.

Frank Noschese presents Kobe, Karplus, and Inquiry posted at Action-Reaction. Noschese challenges his students to determine if a video of Kobe Bryant leaping over snakes is real or fake. In the process, he shows us how to implement a 3-stage Karplus learning cycle.

GT Laden presents Is Blood Ever Blue? Science Teachers Want to Know! : Greg Laden's Blog posted at Greg Laden's Blog. Greg Laden is a science blogger, but occasionally writes posts specifically for science teachers. This one is about the confusion between the color of blood.

Kimberly Lightle presents What's Happening to Polar Bears? Real Data, Claims, and Evidence posted at Connecting News with National Science Education Standards. This blog, part of the National Science Digital Library, provides examples of how to connect science news to the classroom.

John Burk presents Measuring the earth with skype and a stick « Quantum Progress posted at Quantum Progress. John adds a bit of technology to move this classic inquiry activity beyond his classroom's walls.

Patricia Oaklief presents Why Students in Slovenia and Russia Do Better Than Ours in Math and Science posted at Amigram (Free Online Announcements) Blog. Oaklief summarizes the evidence that shows that U.S. students are falling behind the rest of the world, and asks us to think beyond "how much content?" and focus on "what is important?"

Gemma Young presents Could London Rock? posted at Snapshot Science. Young asks her students if London could be hit by a major earthquake.

WCYDWT-Science (http://wcydwt.posterous.com/) is a multi-authored blog aimed at collecting rich media that can be used as starting points for classroom inquiry.

Interested in standards-based grading in science and math? Check out these three SBG blog carnivals:

SBG 1: MeTA musings

SBG 2: Always Formative

SBG 3: TEACHING|chemistry

Comments (1)Sign in or register to postSubscribe to comments via RSS

John Smith's picture

I enjoyed reading some of the topics posted in this blog, especially the one on is blood ever blue. Students are always coming up with random myths and asking the science teacher about them. I think it is important to use the inquiry method whenever possible in the science classroom to ensure the students are using problem solving skills.

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